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An Tir IL dated 2011-07-02 (Jump to Submissions)

Unto Anthony Black Lion, Elizabeth Lions Blood, and the esteemed heralds from An Tir and elsewhere to whom this missive comes, Rhieinwylydd Boar sends greetings! I hope you are all enjoying the summer weather now that it is finally shown up... hopefully it lasts through An Tir/West War this weekend!

Speaking of war, special thanks to Elizabeth Lions Blood for doing part of my job on this letter so I could get out the door a little faster and much more calmly. Bestest boss evar!

Commentary on this letter is due August 10, 2011.

LIONS BLOOD MEETINGS

TBD - watch the e-list!

FROM LIONS BLOOD

Greetings to the College of Heralds from Elizabeth Lions Blood!

As of this letter, I have two months left serving the College in this capacity. There are so many people I want to thank, and so this month and next month I will be taking some of my letter to do so. You cannot do this job in a bubble and you cannot do it if you think you know everything. I have made a great deal of mistakes and learned from each of them; each time folks have been there to pick me up and continue to encourage me.

First, my teacher - Finngall McKetterick - I would not even have applied for this job without your encouragement. Every time I have doubted or faltered, when I have put the job in front of other things and missed events, you've been there to support and affirm. Thank you for being there every time I needed you.

Baroness Shauna of Carrick Point - you too have encouraged me through my many missteps with paper or with summarizing information to OSCAR. My letters got progressively better the more you gave input and helped me to grow into a better submissions herald. When I started I was very green, but I would like to believe that I am less so with your teaching.

Rhieinwylydd verch Einion Llanaelhaearn, there is not enough I can say that would convey the amount of thanks and respect I have for you. You are among my best friends and I could not have done this job without you. We have different styles of work, but you have helped me learn to plan ahead and I hope I have helped you be a little more spontaneous in return. Your work as Boar has helped me focus on other parts of the job of Lions Blood, and I hope my successor is gifted with a deputy as awesome as you.

Oddr mjǫksiglandi, I have watched you grow as a consulting herald and as an administrative herald and it has made me proud. When I found myself suddenly without a notifications deputy, you and Toki stepped up to fill the void - not only catching up the backlog of letters but writing a tool to make the job much easier for all who follow you. I cannot express my thanks enough that I do not have to worry about my notifications and have been able to focus solely on the other parts of Lions Blood. I'm so pleased to have been able to call you and Toki friends at the end of my term in office.

Jeanne-Marie Lacroix, Gawain of Miskbridge, Ursula Georges and Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme - thank you for all of your out-of-kingdom commentary, either here in our version of OSCAR and in private correspondence. The input you have given me has augmented my knowledge of names and armory and enabled me to contribute better as a Society commentary herald when my job as Lions Blood is over. What you have shared with me in techniques and other knowledge cannot be repaid any other way but forward to others.

Again, there will be more of this next month, in my very last letter to the College as Lions Blood. Thank you for the amazing experience that has been given to me and I hope to be able to pay even half of it forward to my successor. Watch the list for details as to who this will be.

I remain, in service to the An Tir College of Heralds,

Lady Elizabeth Turner de Carlisle, GdS

Lions Blood Herald

LAUREL ACTIONS

The following is excerpted from the April 2011 Cover Letter.

From Pelican: Clarification on the Use of Adjectives within the Designators of Order Names

In February, I was asked to rule whether Meridian Order of the Blade could be registered with a letter of permission to conflict with the registered Brotherhood of the Blade. I ruled that it could - that the addition of the adjective Meridian in the designator of an order name could be a sufficient difference to allow the registration of the item with a letter of permission to conflict. This is the same situation as the addition of the same adjective (or other forms of a branch name) in the substantive part of the order name.

I was probably not as careful in my wording as I might have been, as apparently the decision is being read by some as a more sweeping ruling that would allow the addition of adjectival forms of SCA branch names in the designator to allow the registration of a new submission without a letter of permission to conflict. This would be different than the current treatment of the same adjectival forms in the substantive portion of the name (which are registerable only with permission to conflict). I assure all that such a reading of the decision was not my intent and will not be upheld. In point of fact, the precedent says "Therefore, we rule the use of a kingdom name (here in an adjectival form) in the designator is sufficient to allow the registration of an item with permission to conflict, just as the addition of it to the substantive element is" (emphasis editorial).

Branch names, whether used in the substantive portion of an order name or in the designator, only contribute enough to difference to allow the registration of an item with a letter of permission to conflict. Let me apologize for any confusion that may have arisen because of the phrasing.

From Pelican: Regarding Requests for Reconsideration

This month, commentary on the request for reconsideration of the names Og the Red and Dagmar Halvdan made it clear that there are misunderstandings about the process.

Requests for reconsideration give submitters the right to appeal Laurel decisions when a submission was registered with changes. Before this policy was established, submitters whose names were changed in ways they did not like were forced to pay to fix the problems, while submitters whose names were returned were given the right to appeal those decisions without charge. In January 2003, submitters whose names were changed as the result of an authenticity request were given the right to request reconsideration. Often, this entailed dropping the authenticity request, but the policy also allowed for the presentation of data showing that a change was made in error.

In the 2009 rewrite of the Administrative Handbook, the decision was made to extend this privilege to all submissions. The goal is to allow submitters whose names are registered the same right to question Laurel's decisions as those submitters whose names are returned. The hope was that it makes it easier for submitters to allow changes, knowing that if they get a result they're unhappy with, they have recourse.

The language in the Administrative Handbook regarding requests for reconsideration explicitly parallels the language for appeals, with a few minor alterations. One important aspect of this policy is that there is no time limit to requests for reconsideration; the request does not need to be timely. New evidence that a change was made in error may be presented years or decades later (though we do not encourage waiting that long). However, requests to change a name to a form suggested by Laurel or by kingdom will not be honored if the request for reconsideration is not made in a timely manner. The one major difference between appeals and requests for reconsideration is that requests for reconsideration are treated like resubmissions for money purposes. That means that kingdoms may charge for them (after a year), but Laurel does not.

As with appeals, requests for reconsideration based on evidence that a change was made in error require the submitter to supply evidence that the decision should be changed (whether it's by citing a Laurel decision that says the name is registerable, by dropping an authenticity request, or by providing new documentation). However, as with appeals, we do not allow kingdoms to return requests for reconsideration: they must be forwarded in a timely manner with or without recommendation to Laurel. So even if the evidence seems flimsy, kingdoms are required to send them up to Laurel and let the College of Arms sort them out.

From Pelican: Some Name Resources (a series)

Documenting order names and heraldic titles is one of the frustrating jobs which falls to every kingdom and many baronial heralds. The standards for these non-personal names at this time are tighter than they historically were, but we also have better resources available.

Let's start with the resources. This is going to sound a little self-absorbed, but I got annoyed with the available resources a few years ago (all right, a decade ago) and started researching herald's titles and order names. It took a while, but finally came to fruition as two articles that substantially improved our knowledge of period practice.

For order names, we have "Medieval Secular Order Names" at http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/order/new/ or at http://www.medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/ (they're identical in content, but formatted differently). Someday I'll get the religious order names done; for the moment I'll note that most were named for places. This article gives an analysis of patterns (noting that "other" isn't a pattern; it simply groups items that don't fit neatly in larger categories), standardized forms, and documentary forms.

For herald's titles, we have "Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance" at http://www.medievalscotland.org/jes/HeraldicTitlesSCA/index.shtml. It again gives an analysis of patterns (noting that "other" isn't a pattern), standardized forms, and documentary forms.

So, what do you do with them? For any submission, you have to argue that the submission follows a particular pattern for creating that kind of name. Patterns are somewhat limited in time and space: a pattern documented for 16th century England is not automatically justifiable in Russia, or for 11th century England. However, there are patterns that were used broadly over Europe from the 14th to 16th century, and those are justifiable for more times and places.

Unfortunately, that means that some times and places are just out of luck for the creation of herald's titles and order names. We have no evidence that either were in use before the 12th century, and only a few patterns were in use before 1300. That means that languages that fell out of use before that time (Old Norse, Old English, Frankish, etc.) cannot be used to create heraldic titles or order names, as there are no patterns for them to follow. Herald's titles and orders were used broadly in Europe, even eastern Europe, but they did not spread further. Therefore, the registration of either a heraldic title or an order name in Russian, Arabic and other Middle Eastern languages, and Asiatic languages is not allowed. I know that it creates a difficult situation for those whose personas are from outside the main European powers, but those European powers are the home of the heraldic/chivalric game we play.

Patterns must be closely followed: evidence of the use of a vernacular color term is not evidence of the use of a heraldic color term, and "other adjective" doesn't mean "any adjective" (it just means that there are some that are hard to classify). Similarly, just because you joke about venerating some item doesn't make it a religious object of veneration for our purposes. Instead you must demonstrate that the object was venerated in period (or that it matches a pattern of objects venerated in period).

Having demonstrated that the submission follows a pattern, you have to demonstrate that the words within it are period and spelled in a period way (or justified as the lingua Anglica version of a foreign language name). Using the lingua Anglica allowance is a way to get modern spellings if you don't like the period spellings; just construct the order name or title in another language (French often does the trick). However, you still must justify the terms as period; the lingua Anglica allowance doesn't get you out of that hard work.

Finally, don't be afraid to get outsiders to help; and please do it before you get attached to an unregisterable name. Too many times, I've seen groups heartbroken when the name they want is ruled to not follow a period pattern.

From Wreath: A Four-Pointed Problem

The following precedent appeared on the December 2010 LoAR:

Lacking evidence that a mullet of four points was used in period heraldry, we are declaring the use of a mullet of four points a step from period practice. [Nasir ibn al-Khazzaz ibn Qadir, A-Atlantia]

A discussion on the SCAHRLDS mailing list provided several pieces of documentation for the mullet of four points in period heraldry. Raneke, in Svenska medeltidsvapen, has examples:

  • Volume II, p. 739, has "per pale (no tinctures), in the sinister half seven mullets of four points 2, 2, 2, and 1". (It is not the main blazon: it is further down in that section's text)

  • Volume II, p. 809 has "a chevron and in base a mullet of four points"

Other documentation includes the arms of Richard Slacke, Windsor Herald in the 15th Century: Azure a cross formy throughout per bend sinister ermine & or charged in the center with a mullet of four points counterchanged, which is on page 233 of Joseph Foster's Two Tudor Books of Arms (available through Google Books).

Therefore, the use of a mullet of four points has been shown to be period practice. All precedents saying that it is a 'weirdness' or a 'step from period practice' are overturned.

Even were all of the citations from Raneke, this would not be a regional style exception. The last paragraph of the July 2010 Documented Exceptions ruling reads: "This does not change standards for documenting charges new to SCA heraldry: a single example of the charge used in a period heraldic jurisdiction remains sufficient." All medieval heraldic jurisdictions are treated equally; preference is not granted to any jurisdiction, Anglo-Norman or otherwise.

LAUREL REGISTERED THE FOLLOWING ITEMS IN APRIL 2011

Ætta surt. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Submitted as Ætta surtr, Old Norse adjectival bynames like this one must agree with the given name in gender. In this case, the feminine form is surt. We have made that change in order to register the name.

Alys Wolfden. Badge. (Fieldless) On a rose vert barbed Or a wolf's head couped argent.

Ase Addæottir. Name and device. Purpure, a butterfly between in cross four spears issuant from the edge of the field points to center Or.

Submitted as Ása Ásadottír, the submitter expressed interest in the name Ase Adasdottir. Something very close to that can be documented as a later Scandinavian name. The SMP (s.n. Ase) dates Ase to 1333 and (s.n. Adde)Addæson to 1358. So Ase Addædottir is a 14th century Swedish name.

While this name is registerable as submitted, the submitter indicated that she preferred the later form. We have thus made this change in order to meet the submitter's request.

Basilius Fuchs. Device. Per chevron throughout argent and sable, two cutlasses in chevron sable and a phoenix Or rising from flames proper.

Bryce of Tir Rígh. Holding name and device. Azure, an eagle and in base a crescent all within an orle Or.

Submitted under the name Kallik Lyceas, that name was returned on the March 2011 LoAR.

Charles Rose. Name and device. Sable, a chevron inverted gules fimbriated and in chief a compass rose argent.

Nice English name from the 13th to 16th century!

The Letter of Intent mentioned the journalist Charlie Rose. While he is a public figure, he is not important enough to protect.

Edmund Halliday. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Jade Redstone. Name.

Jade was documented as the submitter's legal middle name. Edelweiss was able to find evidence of its use as both a masculine and feminine name in grey period England. Similarly, Edelweiss was able to date Redstone to 16th century England.

Johanna Kopmansdotter. Name.

Nice Norwegian name for around 1500!

Karach Ryndin. Name and device. Paly bendy azure and argent, on a bend sinister gules three crosses crosslet fitchy palewise argent.

Karin Georgsdotter. Device. Or, an eagle sable between three crescents gules, a bordure azure.

Nice device!

Laurs surtr. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Submitted as Lars surtr, the name as submitted has two steps from period practice. Lars first appears in the later 15th century in Denmark and Norway as a form of Lawrence. The byname surtr is Old Norse; later forms are spelled quite differently. Thus there is a step from period practice for the lingual mix of Old Norse and Norwegian and another for the temporal disparity between the elements (as surtr can't be dated to after the 11th century).

The spelling Laurs is dated to 1391 (in Lind s.n. Lafranz). That puts in close enough to the latest date for surtr that there is only the single step from period practice for the lingual mix. We have therefore made that change in order to register the name.

Laurs surtr and Ætta surt. Badge. (Fieldless) A sun per bend sinister argent and sable eclipsed counterchanged.

Máel Brigte ingen Aimirgin. Name and device. Argent, a brazier gules.

Appearing on the Letter of Intent as Máel Brigte inghean Aimhirgin, the byname needs to be completely Middle Gaelic, to match the time in which the patronym was used. That form is ingen Aimirgin. We have made that change in order to register the name.

There is a CD between a brazier and a beacon, so this device is clear of the seal of Beacon Principal Herald, (Tinctureless) A beacon enflamed, with the second CD being for comparing tinctureless and tinctured armory.

Norman of Eoforwic. Device. Argent, a pomme within an orle vert.

Oliva Magdalena. Name and device. Purpure, on a bend gules fimbriated between two phoenixes a spoon Or.

Submitted as Oliva Magdalena de Haro, the submitter asked to drop the locative if there were evidence of unmarked matronymic bynames in Italian. There are family names that take that form, so we have dropped the locative element.

Rhieinwylydd verch Einion Llanaelhaearn and Galeran Chanterel. Release of badge. Per bend indented argent and sable, a fleur-de-lys azure and a lion's head cabossed argent.

Triduana Traherne. Name and device. Per pale gules and Or, in pale three lions couchant contourny sable, the middle one gorged of a coronet argent.

Appearing on the Letter of Intent as Triduana Treherne, the name was submitted as Duana Traherne. Commenters were able to find the byname Traherne as a late period English form. We have therefore restored the byname to the submitted form.

Triduana is a saint's name. The submitter may want to know that Duena is found as a given name in 14th century Navarre; the combination of that name with Traherne would be a step from period practice.

Please instruct the submitter that there should be more internal detailing on the lions, so they are more easily identifiable.

The submitter is a viscountess, and thus entitled to the use of a coronet.

Tryggr Tyresson. Name (see RETURNS for device and badge).

Submitted as Tryggr Tyrsson, the submission Tryggr Tyrson was returned in August 2009 because Tyr could not be documented as a human name.

While the submitter was able to demonstrate that Tyrsson is a modern surname, no one was able to find evidence that it was used in period. The data that commenters could find suggests that the period form is more likely to be Tyresson, which is given as the (possibly modernized) spelling found in 1615, for example in Svenska ättartal. However, this is sufficient to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt that Tyresson is a grey period spelling.

Commenters pointed to a "medieval" ballad about Pers Tyrsson. Unfortunately, this is a misnomer. The "medieval Swedish ballads" were actually collected in the early 19th century. While it is possible that this ballad may date to before 1600, a period text would need to be found and the appropriate spelling of the name ascertained.

While the submitter allows only minor changes, he documented the name as Swedish, and this form is Swedish as well. Thus, we have changed the byname to the dated form in order to register it.

Ysabella Morena. Name and device. Argent, a bear passant azure between three dragonflies vert.

This name mixes an Italian given name with a Spanish byname, which is a step from period practice. The completely Spanish form would be Ysabel Morena.

 

LAUREL RETURNED THE FOLLOWING ITEMS FOR FURTHER WORK IN APRIL 2011

Ætta surt. Device. Quarterly argent and sable, in sinister canton three swords inverted in fess argent within a bordure vert.

This device is returned for having the appearance of marshalling. The Rules for Submissions, section XI.3, say that "No section of the field may contain an ordinary that terminates at the edge of that section, or more than one charge unless those charges are part of a group over the whole field." The sinister chief quarter contains multiple charges. While they are all of the same type, they are not part of a group over the whole field.

Edmund Halliday. Device. Or semy of trefoil knots inverted azure, a crane close contourny sable within an orle vert.

This device is returned for a redraw. The strewn charges are not recognizable heraldic charges. Trefoil knots would be interlaced and have rounded ends, as seen at http://www.aeheralds.net/Links/AE_Traceable_Art/IndivPDFs/Knot_trefoil_2.pdf. Triquetras inverted would be interlaced, as seen at http://www.aeheralds.net/Links/AE_Traceable_Art/IndivPDFs/Triquetra.pdf. It was suggested that we could blazon these as three leaves conjoined in pall Or fimbriated azure. However, strewn charges are only considered to be "in the center of the design" when the strewn charges are the primary charge group.

Laurs surtr. Device. Quarterly argent and sable, in sinister canton three swords inverted in fess argent.

This device is returned for having the appearance of marshalling. The Rules for Submissions, section XI.3, say that "No section of the field may contain an ordinary that terminates at the edge of that section, or more than one charge unless those charges are part of a group over the whole field." The sinister chief quarter contains multiple charges. While they are all of the same type, they are not part of a group over the whole field.

Robert of Wolford. Device. Sable, a wolf rampant to sinister ermine maintaining in the sinister paw a bow bendwise and in the dexter a sheaf of arrows inverted argent.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Dorcas Dorcadas, Sable, a three-headed hound rampant contourny, one head reguardant, argent. There is no CD granted for the number of heads by precedent: "...the change from one head to three heads is not sufficient for another CD." [Rodrigo Hernandez de Toledo, December 1997, R-Atlantia] There is only a single CD for the change of tincture of the primary charge from argent to ermine.

Please instruct the submitter that, in order to avoid confusion with heraldic lions and tygers, that the wolf should be drawn with its ears more erect and with less appearance of having a lion's mane. The illustration in Parker (http://www.heraldsnet.org/saitou/parker/Jpglossw.htm#Wolf) shows a smooth neck, more typical of heraldic wolves.

Tryggr Tyresson. Device. Gyronny of eight gules, argent, sable, argent, gules, argent, sable, argent.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Wulfgar Neumann, Gyronny sable and argent, a bordure counterchanged. There is a CD for the removal of the bordure, but not a CD for changing the tincture of only 1/4 of the field.

The device is also a conflict with the device of Cerdic Weyfare, Gyronny arrondy of six gules and argent. Precedent says:

[Returning Gyronny arrondy of six azure and argent] Conflict with Cerdic Weyfare, Gyronny arrondy of six gules and argent, and Ottar Hrafnsson, Gyronny arrondy Or and azure. There is no difference between gyronny of eight and gyronny of six, and since both devices share a tincture with Hallr's, there is only one CD for changing the tincture of the field. [Dofinn-Hallr Morrisson, February 2003, R-East]

There are no differences granted between the devices. Changing the tincture of one quarter of the field is insufficient, even for field-only devices, and we do not grant a CD for the difference between gyronny and gyronny arrondi.

This device is also in conflict with the device of Campbell, the Duke of Argyll, Gyronny Or and sable. There is not a CD for swapping the tinctures of a field which is divided into more than four parts. There is only a CD for the change of tincture of three-quarters of the field.

Tryggr Tyresson. Badge. (Fieldless) In pale a double tiwaz rune conjoined to a sail-less drakkar sable.

This device is returned for visual conflict under section X.5 of the Rules for Submissions with the device of Aran of Old, Earl of Argent, a lymphad sable. Several commenters and all of those at the meeting felt that the double Tyr rune was insufficiently different from the sail in the Earl's armory.

On resubmission, the submitter should provide evidence for the use of abstract symbols conjoined to and replacing important parts of other charges in period armory. While we are not aware of any evidence for the use of such a motif, we will not rule on that question at this time.

 

LIONS BLOOD ACTIONS

The following items have been forwarded to Laurel and are tentatively scheduled to be decided on in September 2011.

* Aquaterra, Barony of - New Badge

(Fieldless) An arming buckle vert

* Aquaterra, Barony of - New Badge

(Fieldless) A bear rampant sable scaly Or

* Azizah bint Rustam - Resub Device

Per bend sinister sable and paly wavy gules and argent, in bend a calygreyhound rampant guardant argent and a crescent sable

* Gryffyn ap Madyn - Resub Device

Azure, a dolphin urinant maintaining in its mouth an arrow fesswise and in chief three harps Or

* Isabeau la petite - New Name and New Device

Per fess azure and vert, a unicorn passant argent charged on the shoulder with a mullet gules.

The byname is forwarded as "la petite" instead of "la petit" to make the byname gender-consistent throughout. The submitter preferred a feminine name and so we changed it to "la petite" instead of "le petit".

* Mericke de Ross - New Name and New Device

Per bend wavy argent and azure, a roundel and a wolf sejant ululant counterchanged.

* Radmund of Middleho - New Name

This byname was submitted as "of Midloe Grange". No documentation was provided for any element of his name, much less the byname. Commenters found "Middleho" dated to 1135 in Ekwall s.n. Midloe, so we have changed the byname to a spelling

temporally compatible with the Anglo-Saxon given name based on all the available options. We dropped the "Grange" portion because we could find no evidence of bynames like this in a time period that matched the given name.

* Tokharik{a-} Jñ{a-}ti - New Name

* Viktor Kladivo - New Name and New Device

Per chevron gules and sable, an owl's head cabossed and in chief three

roundels argent.

The following items have been returned by Lions Blood in June 2011.

* Berte le Webbere - Resub Device

Argent, a wingless dragon haurient embowed to sinister nowed vert, a bordure embattled sable

This device is returned for redrawing. The bordure should have less traits, drawn much bolder, and the dragon remains in an unblazonable posture. The posture given in the provided blazon, haurient, is reserved for sea-creatures and cannot be used for a dragon.

1: Aladar Stenson - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• Sound most important.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. He will accept all changes, cares most about sound ('Alodar Stanson'), and desires a male name. The following is quoted from the 'notes' section of the form:

From email from Ursula Georges [ursula@TUTELARIES.NET], 23 May 2011 to SCAHRLDS:

Hungarian and German combinations are registerable with one weirdness. Bahlow/Gentry s.n. <Steensen> dates the spelling  <Stensen> to 1603. That's too late for combination with a  thirteenth-century name without a second weirdness, but we can push <Aladar> a bit later: one <Perbarth filius Aladar> 'Perbarth son of Aladar' appears in a Latin document from 1335:

http://books.google.com/books?id=CUhIAAAAYAAJ &pg=PA472#v=onepage&q&f=false

[Oddr: This document is the "Codex diplomaticus domus senioris comitum  Zichy de Zich et Vásonkeő, Volume 1", p472 (p493 of the PDF), "[...] quam Prebarth filius Aladary contra Jacobum Paulum [...]", as well as "Aladár" mentioned in the paragraph preceding.]

Thus, <Aladar Stensen> should be registerable as a Hungarian/German combination.

Copies of the relevant pages from the Codex mentioned were included with the submission.

1: Aladar Stenson - New Device

Gyronny arrondy of six argent and azure, a triskelion of dragon's heads sable.

2: Aladar Stenson - New Badge

(Fieldless) A dragon's head erased sable gorged of a pearled coronet argent.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. He is in the OP as having received a court baron (under the name <Alodar Stanson> on May 21, 2011) and is thus entitled to the use of a coronet in his arms.

3: Emma Compton - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Language (English) most important.
• Culture (14th c.) most important.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. She will accept all changes, cares most about language/culture (14th c. England), and desires a female name. The following is summarized from the included documentation.

<Emma> is cited in Feminine Given Names in 'A Dictionary of English Surnames' available at http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyAG.html, with a number of citations dating between 1130 and 1458.

<Compton> is cited in St. Gabriel report 1430; that particular spelling is dated to 1212 and 1376. The report cites R&W.

4: Gervais Blakglove - New Name

• Meaning (not specified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Wyewood. He will accept all changes, cares most about meaning (not specified) and did not make any request regarding gender. The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form.

"Studies on Middle English Nicknames" by Jan Jonsjo

Lund: CWK Gleerap 1979 pages 56, 57

Black + clothing

examples: blakehood (black+hood, blakhat (black+hat), blakmantel (black+mantel)

Middle English Dictionary

s.v. glove (n)

1393: "Bot er their [lovers] gon... thei take ate leste out of hir hand or ring or glove."

4: Gervais Blakglove - New Device

Azure, on a lozenge Or a glove sable

5: Hafr-Tóki - New Badge

(Fieldless) A goat rampant pean.

The submitter notes that 'clymant' would be more correct but prefers 'rampant' as it allows a better pun.

6: Killian Flynn - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No holding name.
• No major changes.
• Sound (not specified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Lyonsmarche. He will not accept major changes, cares most about sound (none specified) and desires a male name. The following is summarized from the included documentation.

<Killian>:

  • from the Catholic Encyclopedia article on St. Kilian ( http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08639a.htm). This article also gives the spellings <Killena> and <Cillíne>.
  • Woulfe gives <O'Killiane> and <Killiane> s.n. <O'Cilleain> as forms from the time of Elizabeth I or James I.
  • Mari's Index of Names in Irish Annals includes <Cilléne> and <Cillíne> with occurrences between 713 and 817 ( http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cillene.shtml )
  • M.A. O'Brien's Corpus Genealogiarum Hibernaie (Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1976) lists "Cilleain, Cilline" 24 times (no copies included)

<Flynn>:

  • MacLysaght says: "Anglicized form of the Gaelic O'Floinn from Flann, a byname meaning Reddish, ruddy... O'Flynn's are numerous but only a few found their way into Irish history... Fiacha o'Flynn Archbishop of Tuam (1255).
  • Catholic Encyclopedia article on the Archdiocese of Tuam ( http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15079d.htm ) says that Flann O'Flynn built the "Scholar House" at the Abbey of Athenry (the Abbey was built in 1241, the article is not clear on the date of the Scholar House)
  • Woulfe gives <M'Flyn> and <Flyn> s.n. <Floinn, Mac Floinn> as forms from the time of Elizabeth I or James I

The submitter states the following: "While the byname Flynn, meaning reddish or ruddy, is referenced in many modern texts, I cannot substantiate it in period texts. Thus, Flynn is then in intended to be a second given name, which is a step from period practice, but allowed in Anglicized Irish. I prefer the form <Flynn> if possible."

7: Killian Flynn - New Household Name

The MacThoy

• Submitter has no desire as to gender.
• No holding name.
• No major changes.
• Sound (not specified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Lyonsmarche. He will not accept major changes, cares most about sound (not specified), and doesn't care about the gender of the name. The following is quoted directly from the included documentation.

Mac Thoy or Mac Thoye:

  1. I would like to maintain the sound of the name as much as possible like the Greek word MOCHTHOI (Μοχθοι). Based on the Greek term Μοχθοσ, Μοχθοι, meaning troubles or misfortune. It is a common adj found in most any Ancient Greek-English Lexicon (Liddle-scott "a intermediate Greek-English Lexicon, pp 520 or CAE Luscnig "An introduction to Ancient Greek" pp. 320) in this way it would function like any other adjective used as a byname (Alexander the Great etc).

    1. Some references to the word Μοχθοσ, Μοχθοι in Ancient texts.

      1. Opening of Euripieds Medea "Oh my troubles"
      2. Crointhians 11:27 "weariness and painfulness"
      3. 1st Thessalonians 2:9 "Travails... difficulties"
      4. 2nd Thessalonians 3: "Painfulness"

    2. From the LGPN (5th c. BCE - to the late Roman Empire) "While the natural tendency was to choose desirable attributes, it was not always the case, and it remains a matter of psychological curiosity to us why some forms were chosen, and even handed down within families: thus,

      1. αισχρος 'ugly' forming Aischros, Aischra, Aischrion;
      2. χοπρος 'dung' forming Kopria, Kopris, Koprilla etc."

        (http://www.lgnp.ox.ac.uk/index.html)

    3. Thus I think it is reasonable to have a variant based on "troubles or misfortune"

      1. Mochthos, Mochthia, Moctthrion, etc.

  2. If the Greek origins do not convince...

    1. Woulfe gives <O Toye> as a form dated to the time of Elizabeth I or James I (under header O Tuaith) and <O Thuoty> and <O Towie> (under header O Tuataigh, derived from the same root name). (Woulfe, Patrick. Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall: Irish Names and Surnames)

      1. The names are closely related - we think that Thoye is a reasonable interpolation

    2. We think that Mac might be suitable with this element, given that we found only forms with O for both it and <O Tuathail> in Woulfe, despite the fact that the latter is clearly documented as a 16th c. name in Mari's Annals index. Woulfe is unclear as to whether <Tuataigh> was used as a given name or not.
    3. Thus I think it is reasonable to have a Mac Thoye based on Anglicized Irish.

8: Meave Cunningham - Resub Badge

Vert, in pale a turtle rampant argent conjoined to a pumpkin Or.

The submitter's branch is Adiantum. Her name was registered September of 2010 via An Tir. Her previous badge submission, Vert, a pumpkin Or, was returned by Laurel in September of 2010:

Due to the extreme visual similarity between pumpkins and apples we will not grant difference between apples and pumpkins.

This badge, therefore, conflict with the badge of Adelicia Tagliaferro, (Fieldless) An apple Or, with a single CD for the difference between a fielded and a fieldless design.

The badge also conflicts with the device of Siobhan O'Riordain, Vert, an apple and a chief dovetailed Or, with a single CD for the addition of the chief.

The badge is, however, clear of the device of Briony Blåaslagen Per bend Or and sable, in bend sinister three leaves two and one stems to center slipped and conjoined in a trefoil knot vert, the whole conjoined to a pumpkin proper, reblazoned elsewhere in this letter. The pumpkin and leaves are co-primary charges joined by the stem. There is, therefore, a CD for the changes to the field and a CD for the change of number of primary charges.

9: Nigel Compton - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• Language (English) most important.
• Culture (14th c.) most important.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. He will accept all changes, cares most about language/culture (14th c. England), and desires a male name. The following is summarized from the included documentation:

<Nigel> - from Masculine Given Names in the 1296 Lay Subsidy Roll, http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/Rutland/given-masc-alpha.htm

<Compton> is cited in St. Gabriel report 1430; that particular spelling is dated to 1212 and 1376. The report cites R&W.

10: Oddr mjọksiglandi - Resub Badge

(Fieldless) a comet fesswise Or

His previous submission, (Fieldless) A comet bendwise sinister inverted Or, was returned by Laurel in March 2011:

This badge is returned for conflict with the device of Esmirelda Dancingstar, Purpure, a shooting star bendwise sinister Or. Shooting stars, by definition, are comets inverted, so there is a single CD for comparing a fieldless and a fielded design.

He has included a LOPTC with Nicolaa de Bracton of Leicester, who has the registered armory (Fieldless) A comet fesswise gules bearded Or.

11: Philip Peregrine - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Sound (not specified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. He will not accept major changes, cares most about sound (not specified) and desires a male name. The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

Philip - Masculine Given Names Found in the 1296 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Rutland (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/Rutland/given-masc-alpha.htm)

Peregrine - "Misplaced" Names in Reaney & Wilson (c. 1243) (http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/names/misplacednames.htm

11: Philip Peregrine - New Device

Per pale Or and vert, semy of gouttes and a frog counterchanged

12: Steinolf Ketilsson - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• Client requests authenticity for 9th c. Norway.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. He will accept all changes, expresses no preference should his name need to be changed, and desires a male name. He requests authenticity for 9th c. Norway. The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form.

Steinolf appears 14 times in the Landnamabok and Ketill 44 times. Both names also appear in the saga Grettir the Strong.

Photocopies from the Landnamabok (trans. Palsson & Edwards; 1972 University of Manitoba Press) were included.

12: Steinolf Ketilsson - New Device

Per saltire argent and azure, a wolf passant sable and a drakkar proper to sinister, sailed azure.

Thus ends the July 2011 Internal Letter of Intent.

I remain,

yours in service,

Rhieinwylydd verch Einion Llanaelhaearn

Boar Pursuivant

[Elizabeth Lions Blood, writing for Rhieinwylydd Boar]

An Tir OSCAR counts: 7 New Names, 1 New Household Name, 4 New Devices, 2 New Badges. This gives 14 new items. Resub counts: 2 Resub Badges. This is a total of 2 resubmissions on this letter, for a total of 16 actions.

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