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An Tir IL dated 2011-05-04 (Jump to Submissions)

Unto Anthony Black Lion, Elizabeth Lions Blood, and the esteemed heralds from An Tir and elsewhere to whom this missive comes, Rhieinwylydd Boar sends May flowers!

Commentary on this letter is due June 10, 2011.

LIONS BLOOD MEETINGS

April letter - Sunday, May 22 at Crown in Wastekeep

May letter - TBD, watch the e-list

FROM LIONS BLOOD

Greetings unto the An Tir College of Heralds!

This past weekend at Bar Gemels in Terra Pomaria, we were blessed to witness the baptism of a new herald. Geoffrey Fitzhenrie, who has served capably as Hazel Leaf Pursuivant, stepped down at the end of his term. We welcome Maccus of Elgin into the An Tir College of Heralds with open arms as the new Hazel Leaf Pursuivant, baronial herald of Terra Pomaria, and wish him well in his endeavors in his new office. For Geoffrey and Maccus, a joyous noise!

A reminder: we like to congratulate people on their awards and welcome new heralds, so if your branch gets a new herald or a herald receives an award at a local event, please let me know! It has been a pleasure to announce these things in my monthly letter to the College.

My position is open! I have posted it three times but have yet to get a lot of interest. This is not a job you can decide to do in August. It's not complicated, but it does take time to explain. Please, please, please - I will not be staying in the office past September Crown 2011. I think it is important that a new person learn how to do submissions so that the office continues to grow and expand and so that our College continues to grow and invite new blood in. The submissions process is not a secret! The more of us in the College know how to do it, the better equipped we are as a group to share our information with others, to teach and inspire them to become greater than we are. This is how we keep the SCA growing and how we maintain our dream. I encourage you all to think about taking my position, if you are able (please don't abandon another job to take mine!).

To my commentary heralds: you are the best group in the entire known world, and I strongly believe that. Teaching others through commentary is the best reason to be using the OSCAR system as a Kingdom. Your commentary makes my decision making process a non-issue, and my meetings now serve completely as educational opportunities. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart.

This has been a wild ride, and I'm thrilled to keep it going for another four months.

In service to the An Tir College of Heralds,

Lady Elizabeth Turner de Carlisle, GdS

Lions Blood Herald

LAUREL ACTIONS

The following is excerpted from the February 2011 cover letter.

From Laurel: Applications for Laurel

The Board has extended the deadline for applications for the Position of Laurel Sovereign of Arms. Interested parties should see the August 2010 Cover Letter for details on how to apply.

From Olwyn, the retiring Laurel

Since the Board wanted to take more time in making the decision of who they wanted for the next Laurel, and my life has exploded, Countess Elisabeth de Rossignol has graciously volunteered to step in until the transfer can be made and allow me to deal with (another) move. I am eternally grateful to her! I am planning on being at Known World to hand over the crown and regalia to her gentle care. Please treat her once again with all the graciousness and generosity that you have shown to me.

First of all I want to thank all the people who have made the last three years such a pleasure. Istvan Wreath, Juliana Pelican, Aryanhwy Pelican, Shauna Ragged Staff, Juliana Palimpsest, Marie Palimpsest... I could have never done this job without such an outstanding staff. You, and my proofreaders, made it all possible. We have accomplished a lot in the last three years including the approval of the new Administration Handbook, and getting the new rules through to the (almost) final draft. Bravo to all of you for your hard work and dedication.

Over the last three years, Istvan Wreath has gone above and beyond the call of duty. In addition to his duties as Wreath, he has continued work on OSCAR, worked with various kingdoms on setting up OSCAR style systems for internal use, traveled extensively attending Heralds symposiums around the Known World that I could not make due to the Army and a small child, done the work of post-meeting clerk, and generally been not only my right hand, but often my brain. Because of his dedication I would like to take this opportunity to grant him the title of Herald Extraordinaire with all the honors inherent in that title.

Once again, thank you all for a fantastic experience. I have met wonderful people while doing this job, and have made friends that I will cherish for the rest of my life.

From Elisabeth, the incoming Laurel

As my highly esteemed predecessor says, the decision has not yet been made regarding a new Laurel so I will be filling in on an interim basis for six months. With such an outstanding staff to work with I trust I can get up to speed again very quickly.

Mistress Olwyn has a lot to be proud of in the achievements of her tenure as Laurel. I am very pleased to follow in her footsteps and grateful for the good order the office is in. Because of her hard work this transitional phase will be relatively simple and we all benefit. Thank you, Olwyn. Very, very much.

Rather to my own surprise, I am looking forward to the next few months. Although it was tiring and had its moments, my previous tenure was also wonderfully rewarding and the people I met and worked with are some of the most intelligent and interesting I have ever known. I appreciate the opportunity to work with you all again for a while, after which I will cheerfully, nay gleefully, resume my retirement.

From Laurel: The Wreath Transition (and Continuing Pelican)

We are pleased to announce that Emma de Fetherstan will be the next Wreath Queen of Arms. She will step up at the Known World Heralds and Scribes Symposium in June as scheduled. We are also pleased to announce that Juliana de Luna will continue to serve as Pelican Queen of Arms.

From Pelican: Some Name Resources (A Series)

In Irish Gaelic, there is often confusion between literal bynames and inherited family names. While literal bynames dominate in the early part of our period, family names begin to appear by the 10th century. The first kind of family names were clan affiliation bynames, which for men take the form Ó followed by the name of clan founder in the genitive (possessive) case, like Ó Conchobhair or Ó hAodha.

The most typical kind of literal byname describes a man as his father's son (again using the father's given name in the genitive case): mac Conchobhair or mac Aodha. As time went on, family names that use Mac begin to appear; this are sometimes indistinguishable in form from literal bynames. The difference from our point of view is whether the name after mac is the father of the person in question or some ancestor further back in time.

By the time we get to the 16th century, an awful lot of the names that are recorded are inherited family names rather than literal bynames. Therefore, we have to be careful in looking at the names in Woulfe and other sources for late period names; only some of them allow the construction of literal bynames, while others are only registerable as family names. One tip in recognizing the difference: family names are often written, especially by modern scholars, with the relationship terms (like Mac) in capital letters, while literal byname are almost always in lowercase. So if you're looking at a source that has both Mac and mac, that's probably why.

This distinction matters a great deal when we get to women's names, because the constructions for women's literal bynames and women's family names are different. The literal byname form for a woman, used when the name in question is her father's given name, is inghean followed by the father's given name in the genitive case, like inghean Chonchobhair or inghean Aodha. Additionally, the first letter of the father's name often has to be lenited, a softening of the sound often written by adding an h after the letter in question. But a literal byname can only exist when the name is constructed from a given name still in use or a handful of special bynames that were used to create literal bynames. Other kinds of constructions can only be used to create family names.

Women's names take different forms; a woman can never be known in Gaelic as mac X or Ó X. Instead, family names for women generally take the form inghean followed by the masculine form of the family name in the possessive form, meaning "daugher of the X family." The forms are inghean Uí or inghean Mhic; the second words are the possessive forms of the masculine Ó and mac. Examples include inghean Uí Chonchobhairinghean Uí hAodha,inghean Mhic Conchobhair, or inghean Mhic Aodha. Don't forget that the rules for lenition are based on context, so that C is not lenited after a word that ends with -c like mhic. A woman's name in Gaelic always must have theinghean.

So, when you're constructing women's names in Gaelic, you need to be careful. If you're using a source for given names, like Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals," you can construct either literal bynames (using inghean) or family names (using inghean Uí or inghean Mhic). If you're using a source with family names, like Woulfe, you need to figure out if the family name can be used to construct a literal byname, or else stick to the appropriate family name form (using inghean Uí when the masculine Ó is documented and inghean Mhic when the masculine Mac is documented).

No An Tir items were included on the February 2011 LoAR.

The following is excerpted from the March 2011 cover letter.

From Pelican: Some Name Resources (A Series)

This month, the issue of undated header forms has come up a couple of times. It's often true that header forms in important resources for naming are undated. One reason is that those books tend to focus on early citations of the name. Therefore, all is not lost if a header form is not dated. But at the same time, you have to demonstrate that the header form is compatible with period spellings (and at a time when the name was in use).

There are several ways to go about doing this. If it's a language that has dictionaries that deal with period forms, especially with the kinds of collections we see in English (the Middle English Dictionary and the Oxford English Dictionary) or in Spanish (CORDE), then you're in luck. Searching on the preferred spelling is likely to get you somewhere.

Google Books is probably your next best option. You must be careful here, because many books replace period forms with standard modern ones. What you're looking for is a source that includes your desired spelling as well as other spellings for the same name element, or at least a variety of spellings for very similar elements. You have to be careful, because some sources standardize only given names or only placenames. A strategy that I often use is to search on both the form I'm looking for (usually the standard modern form) and a spelling I know dates to period. Once you have found it, be sure that it's a dated form, and not one used only in comments about the document.

Finally, don't be afraid to ask the experts. It's often better to ask before a submission gets to Laurel, as it's easier to engage in a back and forth discussion with the submitter about spellings. But, if all else fails, send it up! There's no guarantee that we'll be able to find the header spelling, but if you don't ask, we won't know. Please, if you do this, be clear about what the submitter wants and what the submitter will accept in the Letter of Intent item. But don't forget: in some languages, commenters have been working miracles.

From Wreath: Tertiary Charges and Difference

For several months we have seen a large number of submissions which attempt to use minuscule tertiary charges and depend on those charges to generate difference. We remind submitters and submissions heralds, that section VIII.3 of the Rules for Submissions says that all charges must remain identifiable and can be rendered unidentifiable by significant reduction in size. The standard for identifiability is whether or not a majority of viewers can identify the charge drawn on a standard-sized submission form at ten feet (about three meters for our metric-enabled folk). If the type of the charge is not recognizable and identifiable at that distance, the submission will be returned for lack of identifiability.

From Wreath: OSCAR and Unintended Consequences

This past month, it was again brought to our attention that a number of heralds are using OSCAR in ways for which it was not originally designed, but which may be highly useful for other heralds.

The first way that it's being used is for documentation. Many heralds, especially newer heralds, do not have the extensive resources of others in the College of Arms. However, a trend is that the same name is frequently popular among multiple submitters. Looking for documentation from sources that appear in Appendix H can be as simple as searching OSCAR for the desired name. This feature should be used with care: check the LoAR to ensure that the documentation was actually acceptable and the name was registered using that documentation. Those with commenting privileges should also check the comments for submissions which have not yet been decided.

Another feature which is enabled by the search function is conflict checking armory which does not yet appear in the Ordinary and Armorial. While this must be done with care, due to misspellings and blazonable variants of the same charge (think: sword, dagger, poinard, rapier, falchion, scimitar, seax, broadsword, greatsword, katana, claymore, etc...), it can be a powerful tool to catch conflicts with recently registered items.

LAUREL REGISTERED THE FOLLOWING ITEMS IN MARCH 2011

Adeliza a Donyng. Device. Or, a tree couped vert within a double tressure purpure.

Adeliza has permission to conflict with the device of Orlando dei Medici, Or, a crequier vert.

Amalric Blackhart. Badge. (Fieldless) Four gouttes de sang conjoined in cross points outward, between and conjoined to four crescents in saltire horns outward argent.

Amalric Blackhart. Badge. (Fieldless) Four gouttes de sang conjoined in cross at the points, between and conjoined to four crescents in saltire horns inward argent.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Heraldic title Sable Chime Pursuivant.

Normally we do not allow heraldic terms for color in heraldic titles or order names, but only the normal color words, like black. However, the descriptive word sable is grandfathered to the submitter for use in heraldic titles, and can thus be registered.

Commenters questioned whether chime could be used as a word for a heraldic charge. Green Staff observed that chime appears to be the period word for cymbal, and Batonvert observes that "It would seem, then, that a cymbala or chimebells would be a set of bells mounted together; like the rank of organ pipes, a composite charge made up of several of another charge. It would make a decent heraldic charge, methinks."

Given this backing, Chime is registerable as a possible name for a heraldic charge (noting that many everyday names for such items were used in order names, so that this does not guarantee its suitability for use in blazons).

An Tir, Kingdom of. Badge. Checky Or and argent, a tai-ch'i fesswise sable and gules and a bordure sable.

Tai-ch'i are registered in the SCA as roundels, which means that the small dots are artistic details. That being the case, tai-ch'i are evenly divided into two parts, and may be of any two tinctures.

The use of tai-ch'i, as non-European artistic motifs, are a step from period practice.

The use of a field checky Or and argent is grandfathered to the kingdom.

Aquaterra, Barony of. Order name Order of the Red Boar and badge (see PENDS for other order name). Argent, a boar statant to sinister and a bordure nebuly gules.

Although the submitters did not date the spelling Boar to before 1600, this name is registerable as the lingua Anglica form of a French or German order name of that meaning. Period spellings of the word in English include bore, bor and boare.

While we appreciate the submitter's desire to be contacted if changes are required, we remind all that the Laurel office processes hundreds of items a month. The only way the Laurel office can contact a submitter if changes are required is by returning the item on a Letter such as this.

Aquaterra, Barony of. Order name Order of the Green Bear and badge. Or, a bear sejant erect affronty and a bordure nebuly vert.

Aquaterra, Barony of. Badge. Or, a kraken and a bordure nebuly azure.

This item was to be associated with the order name Order of the Blue Kraken. That name has been pended, so we are unable to make the association at this time.

Aquaterra, Barony of. Order name Order of the Falcons Talon and badge. (Fieldless) In pale a falcon's foot couped argent sustaining in its talons a sun Or eclipsed azure.

Submitted as Order of the Falcon's Talon, apostrophes were not used until well after 1600. We have removed the apostrophe in order to register the name.

Both Falcon and Talon are found in Middle English. We remind commenters and submissions heralds that grey-period dates for elements such as these are problematic and should be replaced with period dates whenever possible.

Please inform the submitters that the talon should be sustaining the sun at the tip of the rays, not at the center roundel, and the leg should be centered above the roundel, not slightly off to one side.

Brian of Blatha an Oir. Name (see RETURNS for device).

The submitter requested authenticity for 1250. The name is registerable. However, barring evidence that Blatha an Oir is a plausible period placename in use around 1250 (and compatible with the given name), we cannot meet that request for authenticity.

Blatha an Oir is the registered name of an SCA branch.

Carlos Luis Lancero. Badge. Per pale azure and argent, a chevron sable cotised Or.

Chiara Stella. Name.

The submitter did not check the box, but filled in the line requesting authenticity for "12-14th C Italian." We ask submissions heralds to include this information, even if it is ambiguous. The name is registerable, as Stella can be understood as an unmarked matronymic (di Stella, the marked form, is found in Yehoshua ben Haim haYerushalmi's "Names of Jews in Rome In the 1550's"). But we cannot confirm that this element of the name was in use before the 15th century.

Constantine Trewpeny. Name and device. Per chevron sable and gules, three cranes in their vigilance argent.

While the submitter wanted the birds blazoned as herons, they are unmistakably cranes: herons have a tuft of feathers on their head. They are also in a posture, in their vigilance, that is only used for cranes.

Cristopher de Cambio. Name.

This name was changed by kingdom from Kristopher the Cambium, to match the documentation they could find for the elements. The submitter may want to know that he can document Kristopher as his mundane name using legal identification such as a driver's license. Kingdom assumed that he intended the Cambium to refer to a mint and changed it to the grammatically correct Latin form de cambio. He may also want to know that the sound-alike le Campiun 'the champion' is also registerable (dated to 1273 in Bardsley, s.n. Campion).

Dezzrianne Draganova doch'. Device. Sable, in cross a sun Or eclipsed sable between four crescents points outward argent, a bordure Or.

The ban on eclipsing a sun in the same tincture as the field was overturned:

Last month, we registered a single-tinctured eclipsing that matched the field, explicitly overturning the November 1991 precedent only in that case. The November 1991 precedent is hereby entirely overturned. We rule that if the eclipsing is blazonable and not omni-tinctured, it is registerable, though we will not use the post-period term of the field to refer to it in our blazon. [Mevanou verch Reys Yriskynit, November, 2009, A-An Tir]

So this device is registerable.

Eadric Æthelwulf. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Precedent says:

On the basis of these examples, we can conclude that unmarked patronyms based on Old English names were rare but not non-existent in the middle of the 11th century. We rule that an Old English masculine name can be used as an unmarked patronymic byname when there is evidence that the name was in use when this pattern is found, i.e., we allow it for names which were in use in the middle of the 11th century or later.

The name Æthelwulf meets that standard and can be registered as an unmarked patronymic.

Eoin Mac an tSaoir. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Submitted as Eoin Mac an t-saoir, the hyphen is a modern editorial convention. The documentary form is Mac an tSaoir. With that change, the name is authentic for 13th century Gaelic, meeting the submitter's authenticity request (for Gaelic language/culture).

Galeran Chanterel. Badge. (Fieldless) A fleur-de-lys per pale azure and argent.

Nice badge!

Godfrey von Ravensburg. Device. Per pale argent and vert, a vol and in chief a crescent counterchanged.

Isabel of Oxeneford. Device. Sable, a horse passant regardant argent and a chief argent ermined gules.

Karin Georgsdotter. Name.

Leiðólfr Kvígsson. Device. Vert, a bull rampant Or.

This device is not a conflict with the device of Fenwick of Gloster, Vert, a brown water buffalo passant proper, reblazoned elsewhere in this letter.

Leo le Firse. Name and device. Per bend gules and Or, a lion rampant counterchanged.

Nice device!

Lucius von Bamberg. Name and device. Argent, a chevron and in chief a griffin statant to sinister azure.

Lucius is found as a saint's name in German; it is also found as a man's name in 1621 (Seibicke s.n. Lucius). Therefore, this is a wholly German name.

Madrun Gwehyddes. Device. Argent, a chevron couped couched from dexter and a chevron couped couched from sinister interlaced and between four mascles gules, a bordure counter-compony argent and sable.

Please draw the chevrons thicker so they are more prominent as befits primary charges.

Even though the design uses gules mascles on an argent field, this does not fall afoul of our restriction on the newest symbol of the International Red Cross, which is a red mascle displayed on an argent field. In this context, the mascles are not alone on the field and they are not arranged in a line as would be expected of trim or armband style decorations.

Mark of the White Hand. Name and device. Gules, a saltire between four hands, a bordure argent.

Matilda Stoyle. Name.

Nice 13th century English name!

Nerienda Sylvester. Device. Per bend sinister vert and sable, on a bend sinister cotised argent three fir trees couped palewise vert.

Oddr mj{o,}ksiglandi. Name change from Aodh Deoradhán (see RETURNS for badge).

Submitted as Odd_ mj{o,}ksiglandi, the submitter requested authenticity for 10th c. Icelandic. While Odd can be found in Old East Norse dialects, the Icelandic form is Oddr. We have made that change in order to meet his authenticity request.

His previous name, Aodh Deoradhán, is retained as an alternate name.

Oddr mj{o,}ksiglandi. Badge. (Fieldless) A trumpet inverted Or.

Oddr mj{o,}ksiglandi. Exchange of device and badge.

His armory, Per bend sinister dovetailed sable and vert, is now his device. His previous device, Per bend sinister dovetailed sable and vert, a comet bendwise sinister and a trumpet bendwise sinister inverted Or, is now a badge.

Rhieinwylydd verch Einion Llanaelhaearn. Badge. Purpure semy-de-lys, a greyhound couchant Or.

Sadhbh Dhubh. Name and device. Per chevron argent and purpure, three oak leaves vert and a stag's head caboshed argent.

The submitter requested authenticity for 14th century Irish. The given name was in use at that time. We know that the byname was in use by 1421 to describe a woman; it was used by men in the 14th century (as well as much earlier and later). Therefore, it is almost certainly true that this name is authentic for 14th century Irish.

Please instruct the submitter that the point of the per chevron line should rise higher on the field, rising at least to the bottom of where the centermost leaf's stem currently ends.

Sebastian von Aterdorff. Device. Gules, a compass rose argent and a bordure compony argent and sable.

The compony bordure along the bottom edges of the field in this submission is drawn as if it were radiating from the center of the field. While compony frequently has diagonals in the chief corners, compony lines should otherwise be drawn perpendicular to the edge of the field.

While the use of the compass star is a step from period practice, the use of a compass rose is not.

Sébastien de Caen. Badge. Purpure, four fleurs-de-lys in cross, that in base inverted, argent.

Summits, Principality of the. Order name Order of the Heart of the Summits.

The submitters have permission to conflict with the Barony of Highland Foorde's registered Order of the Hart and with the Barony of Windmaster's Hill's registered Order of the Hurt.

Tomyris di Cavallino. Name change from Tamiras Nomadikos.

Submitted as Tomyris di Cavallino, the name was changed at kingdom to Tamaris di Cavallino to meet the current precedent, which says "Tomyris appears to be a unique name - used only for a legendary queen" [Tomyris of the Sauromatae, 01/2004, R-East]." However, this precedent is flawed (not surprisingly, given that the precedent itself says clearly that no evidence about the name was presented).

Tomyris was a Scythian queen who is best known for her defeat of Cyrus the Great of Persia. She was well known in the Middle Ages, as she came to be identified as one of the nine Female Worthies in the 14th century (though the list of female worthies was far more varied than the male list). Though previous precedent says otherwise, she was seen as a positive figure: this can be seen, for example, in Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 1, in which the Countess of Auvergne says "I shall as famous be by this exploit, As Scythian Tomyris by Cyrus death" (First Folio text). The name was used at least once in 15th century Italy in some spelling, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica (s.n. Ramusio). It appears in literary sources across Europe as TomyrisThamaris and in Dante as Thamari.

This is enough to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt and allow the registration of Tomyris as a literary name in Italian context. This spelling is also unquestionably registerable in English language context as a literary name. Other documented spellings are also allowed.

Her previous name, Tamiras Nomadikos, is released.

Tomyris di Cavallino. Release of alternate name Bébhinn Morgan.

 

LAUREL RETURNED THE FOLLOWING ITEMS FOR FURTHER WORK IN MARCH 2011

Amalric Blackhart. Badge. (Fieldless) Within and conjoined to the horns of an increscent argent a goutte de sang.

This badge is returned for conflict with the badge of Laelia Caoilinn nic Bhréanainn, Per chevron rayonny sable and gules, in base an increscent argent. There is a single CD for a fieldless design. The goutte is a maintained charge, which does not count for difference. Relative position on the field cannot grant difference when one of the designs is a fieldless badge.

Similarly, the badge is in conflict with the badge of Isabella de Luna, (Fieldless) A compass star Or within and conjoined to the horns of an increscent argent, and the badge of Sorcha inghean Dhara mhic Seachnasaigh,(Fieldless) A lozenge ployé within and conjoined to the horns of an increscent argent. The compass star and lozenge are also maintained charges.

Amalric Blackhart. Badge. (Fieldless) Within and conjoined to the horns of a decrescent argent a goutte de sang.

This badge is returned for conflict with the badge of Safiya bint Ahmad ibn Abdullah, (Fieldless) Within and conjoined to the horns of a decrescent argent a rose Or barbed vert, and the badge of Eirikr Tryggvasson,(Fieldless) Within and conjoined to a decrescent argent a mullet of seven points sable. The goutte in Amalric's badge, the rose in Safiya's, and the mullet in Eirikr's are each maintained charges. There is a CD for fieldlessness between each of the designs, but maintained charges do not count for difference, so that is the only CD.

The badge is also returned for conflict with the badge of Patrick of the Quietwood, (Fieldless) A tower azure within and conjoined at base to a decrescent argent. Patrick's tower is also a maintained charge, so there is only the CD for fieldlessness.

Azizah bint Rustam. Device. Per bend sinister sable and paly wavy gules and argent, a calygreyhound rampant guardant argent charged on the shoulder with a crescent gules.

Commenters were unable to identify the crescent as a crescent. This violates section VIII.3 of the Rules for Submissions, Armorial Identifiability, which says that "Elements must be used in a design so as to preserve their individual identifiability" and specifically mentions that "significant reduction in size" is one of the ways that identifiable elements may be rendered unidentifiable.

Since it is not identifiable, it does not count for difference. Without the crescent, this device conflicts with the device of Tristram O'Shee, Per saltire sable and gules, a calygreyhound rampant argent, with a single CD for the field. The position of Azizah's calygreyhound is forced by the field, so there is no difference granted for this move.

On resubmission, please instruct the submitter to draw the wavy portion of the field with deeper, more identifiable waves.

Brian of Blatha an Oir. Device. Argent, a tower azure, on a base wavy sable three needles in pile Or.

This device is returned because the line of division blurs the distinction between a per fess line of division and a base.

Brian has permission to conflict with the badge of Leiðólfr Kvígsson, Argent, a tower azure and a base wavy sable. While the letter of permission to conflict only says "my badge", and would not normally be valid, Leiðólfr has exactly one piece of armory registered: his badge. Therefore, there is no confusion as to which armory is meant.

Corvaria, Shire of. Badge. (Fieldless) On a crow azure, three triangles bendwise sinister conjoined Or.

This device is returned for violating section VII.7.b of the Rules for Submissions, which requires that "Elements must be reconstructible in a recognizable form from a competent blazon." Commenters were unable to derive a blazon with the three triangles conjoined at the tips and the whole unit placed bendwise sinister. Various solutions were suggested, but none of the blazons properly describes the relative positions of the three triangles such that they would be in the same place when redrawn.

Eadric Æthelwulf. Device. Sable, a unicorn statant and in chief two acorns slipped and leaved Or.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Lithari of the Lin, Sable, a Chi-ling (Chinese unicorn) statant Or. While the horns of the two creatures are different, that is fundamentally the only non-artistic difference between the two. There is, therefore, not a CD between a Chi-ling and a normal unicorn. There is, therefore, only a single CD between the devices, for the addition of the acorns.

Please instruct the submitter that unicorns in medieval heraldry are based on goats, not horses; it should have cloven hooves and tufts of hair on the legs, in addition to the beard, horn, and lion's tail.

Eoin Mac an tSaoir. Device. Per fess vert and argent, an open book argent and a Latin cross gules.

The submitter argued, and kingdom supported, the idea that we should limit the protection of the Red Cross motif to equal-armed couped crosses. While we sympathize with this perspective, and admit that the American Red Cross supports it, the International Committee of the Red Cross does not.

Commentary on the Second 1949 Geneva Convention (found at http://www.icrc.org/ihl.nsf/COM/370-580048?OpenDocument), says in part:

The records of the Diplomatic Conference of 1906 are, moreover, explicit: the Conference deliberately refrained from defining the form of the cross [p.230] since definition might have led to dangerous abuses. The reasons are clear. If the form of the cross had been rigidly defined, attempts might have been made to justify attacks on objects protected by the Convention on the pretext that the emblems displayed were not of the prescribed proportions. Similarly, unscrupulous persons could have taken advantage of a rigid definition to use a slightly larger or slightly smaller red cross for commercial purposes.

As this is the official policy of the International Committee of the Red Cross regarding representations of a treaty-protected motif, we have no choice but to confirm this. We will continue to prohibit "the use of a red straight armed cross with flat, couped ends to the arms on any white background, or in any way that could be displayed on a white background, including as a tertiary charge, even if some of the arms are elongated so that it is not blazonable exactly as a cross couped gules."

Kallik Lyceas. Name.

This submission is based on a misreading of the data in the LGPN. The form Kallik- is a truncated version of multiple longer names, like Kallikles and Kallikrates; we know that the first was used in the later Byzantine empire. The shortened version is not registerable, as there is no evidence it was used as a name (it's literally just the first six letters of a name). We would change the given name to one of the documented forms, but this would be a major change, which the submitter did not allow.

Lycias, or as it is more commonly transcribed Lysias, is a Greek given name. In a Greek context, it would need to be placed in the genitive case; it could be found in a Latinized context in the unmodified form. We know that it continued in use into the first century, as a Claudius Lysias appears in the Bible (Acts 21-24). Such a Latinized name can be combined with the Greek given name, but the combination is a step from period practice. A completely Latinized form would be Callicles Lysias.

Oddr mj{o,}ksiglandi. Badge. (Fieldless) A comet bendwise sinister inverted Or.

This badge is returned for conflict with the device of Esmirelda Dancingstar, Purpure, a shooting star bendwise sinister Or. Shooting stars, by definition, are comets inverted, so there is a single CD for comparing a fieldless and a fielded design.

 

LIONS BLOOD ACTIONS

The following items have been forwarded to Laurel and are tentatively scheduled to be decided on in July 2011

Adelaida de Honfleu. Name and device. Per fess sable and gules, a hind at gaze argent and three roses argent barbed and seeded proper.

This name was submitted as Adelaide de Honfleur. The sources the submitter used appear to both normalize the names they are dealing with, and so neither element was documented to period. We changed the name to match available documentation based on her desired culture and also changing the fewest things.

Antonio Morosini. Name and device. Sable, a bend purpure fimbriated and in sinister chief a Maltese cross argent.

Bryson McLachlan. Name and device. Per bend azure and sable all estencely, a tyger rampant argent.

This name was submitted with the byname as McLachlan, but precedent says we do not register the scribal abbreviation Mc. Therefore, we have expanded it to the expected Mac.

Cassia Machiavelli. Name (see RETURNS for device).

This given name was submitted as Kassia, but the documentation did not support the spelling beginning with /K/. We could not find the given name with this spelling in any other Italian sources. We have changed it to match the available documentation.

Daniel Broc. Name and device. Per chevron vert and azure, a chevron argent between a badger proper and a water bouget argent.

This name was submitted as Daniel the Broc. The byname was justified as lingua anglica of a similar Norse construction, but we could not find any documentation to back up this claim. The submitter's consulting herald indicated that the sound /broc/ was more important than having a Norse name, so we have dropped the to match available documentation.

Francesca Morosini. Name (see RETURNS for device).

István Györi. Name.

Jennet MacLachlan of Loch Fyne. Name.

Mairghread of Wastekeep. Name and device. Azure, a seahorse Or maintaining a pearl and on a chief argent three Thor's hammers sable.

Mergret Dyer. Device. Azure, a garb Or and on a chief raguly argent three bees sable

We advise the submitter to draw the chief with fewer and larger traits.

Octavia Laodice. Name and device. Vert, a crab Or sustaining to chief a county coronet argent.

Octavia Laodice. Badge. (Fieldless) On a county coronet vert a bezant.

Peregrine Falconer the Navigator. Name and device. Per pale Or and argent, a falcon close proper between three compass stars sable.

Peregrine Falconer the Navigator. Badge. (Fieldless) A falcon's leg couped a la quise belled and jessed argent charged with a compass star elongated to base sable.

Siobhán Gharbh inghean Mháel Dúin. Name and device. Azure semy of estoiles, a chevron and in base a wolf ululant argent.

This name was submitted as Siobhán garbh ingen el-dúin. The name required grammatical changes based on information in various articles by Mari and Effrick regarding Gaelic names, so we changed the name to the fully EMIr form based on conversation with the submitter.

Susan de Wynter. Name and device. Azure, a horse passant and on a chief argent three escarbuncles azure.

Suvia filia Heriberti. Badge. (Fieldless) A griffin statant to sinister drinking from a goblet azure.

Lions Blood returned the following items for further work in April 2011.

Cynewulf Torunnsskald. Name and device. Azure, an owl displayed between three mullets of seven points one and two, all within an orle argent.

This name was returned due to issues with the byame, a constructed name intended to mean 'the skald belonging to/associated with the person named Torunn.' First, we have no documentation that the suffix <-skald> was attached to personal names, but only to titles <e.g. jarlsskald>. Second, even if this were an acceptable pattern, the constructed personal name <Torunn> combines a masculine protheme <Tor-> with a feminine deuterotheme <-unn>. Precedent requires that all elements in a constructed name match in gender.

Lacking a name with which to associate it, this device must also be returned.

Dante Machiavelli. Badge. Per bend sinister azure and sable, a bend sinister bewteen two lacy knots argent.

This badge conflicts with Wilhelm Finger (device, May 1985, Ansteorra), Per bend sinister azure and sable, a bend sinister between a vested sinister cubit arm palewise, the hand in benediction, and an armored and gauntleted dexter arm palewise embowed argent, with a single CD for changing the type of secondary charges.

Daveri della Cava. Name and device. Argent, three dragonflies bendwise sinister in pale sable between flaunches azure.

The element <Daveri> is documented as a placename, not as a personal name. Lacking documentation for toponyms being used in place of given names, this must be returned. The device is returned for lack of a name with which to associate it. On resubmission, we advise the submitter to use a 'true blue' marker (e.g. Crayola classic), as several commenters felt this submission used a color somewhere between blue and purple.

Francesca Morosini. Device. Argent, vetu ploye gules, a serpent nowed sable.

Conflict is valid under any blazon. This device can also be blazoned Gules, on a lozenge ployé throughout argent a serpent nowed sable and so it conflicts with Cecilie die Ärtztin (February 1998 via Ansteorra) Gules, on a lozenge throughout argent, a bat-winged dolphin haurient contourny sable, with a CD for the change in type of the tertiary but nothing for lozenge vs. lozenge ployé:

"[Argent vêtu ployé quarterly sable and gules, a cat passant guardant sable] This .... conflicts with Amber Lang, Vert, on a lozenge argent, a cat sejant guardant sable. When comparing armory using a vêtu field with armory using a lozenge, the comparison must be made in two ways: as if both pieces of armory used a vêtu field, and as if both pieces of armory used a lozenge. If we consider Isabel's armory as the equivalent blazon Quarterly sable and gules, on a lozenge ployé througout argent a cat passant guardant sable, there is one CD from Amber's armory for changing the field, but no difference by RfS X.4.j for changing only the posture of the tertiary charge. There is no difference between a lozenge and a lozenge ployé, nor is there difference between a lozenge and a lozenge throughout. [Isabel Margarita de Sotomayor y Pérez de Gerena, 11/2002, R-Trimaris]"

Cassia Machiavelli. Device. Argent, a raven displayed sable maintaining a lute vert and on a chief embattled sable a crescent argent.

This device is returned for lack of identifiability of the maintained lute:

"Third, the maintained charge is so small that it is not visible against the ermined background. While maintained charges do not count for difference, they must still be recognizable. [Ysabel Verdelet, 02/2009, R-Middle]"

On resubmission, we advise to the submitter to draw the lute larger to increase identifiability. Adding the detail of the bent-back pegbox which is characteristic of lutes would also aid in identifiability.

1: Azizah bint Rustam - Resub Device

Per bend sinister sable and paly wavy gules and argent, in bend a calygreyhound rampant guardant argent and a crescent sable.

The submitter's branch is Terra Pomaria. Her first submission, Per bend sinister sable and paly wavy argent and gules, a calygreyhound rampant guardant argent, was returned by Lions Blood for conflict with Tristram O'Shee: Per saltire gules and sable, a calygreyhound rampant argent, with a single CD for the change to the field but nothing for the head position or the forced move of the primary charge.

Her previous resubmission, Per bend sinister sable and paly wavy gules and argent, a calygreyhound rampant guardant argent charged on the shoulder with a crescent gules, was returned by Laurel in March 2011:

Commenters were unable to identify the crescent as a crescent. This violates section VIII.3 of the Rules for Submissions, Armorial Identifiability, which says that "Elements must be used in a design so as to preserve their individual identifiability" and specifically mentions that "significant reduction in size" is one of the ways that identifiable elements may be rendered unidentifiable.

Since it is not identifiable, it does not count for difference. Without the crescent, this device conflicts with the device of Tristram O'Shee, Per saltire sable and gules, a calygreyhound rampant argent, with a single CD for the field. The position of Azizah's calygreyhound is forced by the field, so there is no difference granted for this move.

On resubmission, please instruct the submitter to draw the wavy portion of the field with deeper, more identifiable waves.

2: Barony of Aquaterra - New Badge

(Fieldless) An arming buckle vert

This submission is to be associated with Baronial Sergeantry

This badge is to be associated with the Baronial Sergeantry. The branch name was registered in August of 2002 via An Tir. The submission is accompanied by a letter from the Baron and Baroness of Aquaterra expressing their intent to submit the badge.

3: Barony of Aquaterra - New Badge

(Fieldless) A bear rampant sable scaly Or

This submission is to be associated with Baronial War Unit

This badge is to be associated with the Baronial War Unit. The branch name was registered in August of 2002 via An Tir. The submission is accompanied by a letter from the Baron and Baroness of Aquaterra expressing their intent to submit the badge.

4: Berte le Webbere - Resub Device

Argent, a wingless dragon haurient embowed to sinister nowed vert, a bordure embattled sable

The submitter's branch is Terra Pomaria. Her name was registered via An Tir in October 2010. Her previous device submission,

Argent, a wingless dragon embowed to sinister nowed vert, a bordure embattled sable, was returned by Lions Blood in July 2009:

The device is returned for redrawing. The wingless dragon is not in a standard posture. The term embowed modifies another heraldic posture, such as statant embowed or naiant embowed. Commenting heralds could not discern which heraldic posture this use of embowed was modifying. In addition, the bordure needs some beefing up. The merlons on the bordure should be as wide as they are tall. 

5: Gryffyth ap Madyn - Resub Device

Azure, a dolphin urinant maintaining in its mouth an arrow fesswise and in chief three harps Or

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra. His name was registered via An Tir in December 2010. His previous device submission, Azure, a dolphin naiant maintaining in its mouth an arrow bendwise inverted and in chief three harps Or, was returned by Laurel in December 2010:

Blazoned on the LoI as urinant, that position would have the body predominantly palewise, with the head pointing down. The position of the tail generally doesn't count and the body of this monster is mostly fesswise. Therefore, this device is returned for conflict with the device of Jehanne de Kael, Azure, a whale naiant Or. There is a single CD for the addition of the secondary charge group. No difference is granted for the maintained arrow. Since a whale does not appear to have been used in period arms, the difference between a heraldic whale and a heraldic dolphin is determined visually. The differences between the two are minor enough that we are not willing to grant a CD.

6: Isabeau la Petit - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Meaning (Isabeau the small - in french) most important.

The submitter's branch is Kaldor Ness. She will accept all changes, cares most about meaning ("Isabeau the small - in french"), and desires a female name. The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form.

Isabeau is found in Dauzat (p.337, s.n. Isabelle) with "Isabeau de Baviere femme de Charles VI") (Isabeau de Baviere, wife of Charles VI).

Petit - the source for the name is Documents pour servir a l'histoir du commerc des Pays-Bas avec la France jusqu'a 1585: Tome II Actes notaries Bordeaux 1470-1520

6: Isabeau la Petit - New Device

Per fess azure and vert, a Unicorn passant argent charged on the shoulder with a mullet gules

7: Mericke de Ross - New Name

• No major changes.

The submitter's branch is Midhaven. She will not accept major changes, cares most about spelling, and has no preference regarding the gender of her name.

The following is summarized from the included documentation.

<Mericke> is found in the IGI Parish Records extracts with three instances as a male personal name dated 1641, 1628 and 1600. Other IGI citations (also male personal names) are dated 1619, 1625, and 1558.

http://isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/famhist/fnames/wwgillpn.htm also finds <Mericke>, this time as a female name:

Mericke, f. " John Steene and Mericke his wyfe," Braddan, 1647 (Bps. Bk.). Possibly a MS. error for Avericke, a fairly common name, q.v. But surnames were occasionally given to girl babies at the font; vice Salisbury, Savag, and Sage. Charlotte Yonge says that " Merica " occurs in old Yorks. pedigrees as a Christian name. This would have the same source as the surname Merick.

For <de Ross>, the submitter cites Black (The Surnames of Scotland) s.n. <Ross>: <de Ross> (1205, 1413). Submitter also cites R&W (Dictionary of English Surnames) s.n. <Ross>; however, R&W does not include <de Ross> in this exact spelling. Similar dated forms in R&W include <de Ros> (1086), <de Rosse> (1177) and <de Roos> (1246).

7: Mericke de Ross - New Device

Per bend wavy argent and azure, a roundel and a wolf sejant ululant counterchanged.

Submitter says, "I realize that this is one step from period practice, but I want my wolf howling. Thank you."

8: Radmund of Midloe Grange - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No holding name.

The submitter's branch is Dragon's Laire. He will accept all changes, expresses no preference regarding what is most important to him about the name, and desires a male name. He will not allow the creation of a holding name; however, as he has submitted no armory, this request is irrelevant.

The following is summarized from the included documentation.

<Radmund> is the name of one of the submitter's ancestors and is documented from The Family of Leete by Joseph Leete, published in London in 1906 and available here: http://www.archive.org/stream/familyofleete00leet#page/n9/mode/2up . <Radmund> is found dated to 1278; however, if Boar is interpreting correctly, the name is abbreviated as <Rads> in the period text and extrapolated by the author.

The submitter says that <Midloe Grange> (also spelled Midlow) was once the family home; he includes no documentation

9: Tokharik{a-} Jñ{a-}ti - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No major changes.

The submitter's branch is Dragon's Mist. She will not accept major changes, cares most about language/culture (4th c. Tocharian), and desires a female name.

Boar notes: the character which I input as an 'a' with a line above it is displaying for me as {a-}.

The following is summarized from the included documentation.

All extant documents in the Tocharian B language date from the 6th to 8th century CE, but rarely include anything that allows them to be more closely dated than that. The personal name I have chosen is a woman's name from an inscription in Tocharian B from that broad time period. The byname I've associated with it comes from the Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit language used in the same region and time period. Both languages were used by the Tocharians, the first primarily as a vernacular and the second in more religious contexts, as Buddhism was the commonreligion of the place and time. The name represents a Tocharian woman of approximately the 6th century who lives in Khotan.

The locative <Tokharik{a-}> is found in Baily HW, IndoScythian Studies, being Khotanese texts, vol. VI, Cambridge University Press (1967), which says,

'Bud. Skt has also the feminine ik{a-} and this seems to be intended in the bilingual fragment tokharika, which is rendered by kucaññ iscake, probably 'woman of Kuci.'

<Tokharik{a-}> is also found in Baily HW, Tokharika. The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britian and Ireland, no 2 (1970), pp. 121-122, which says

'In this Buddhist Sanskrit tokharika can be seen the equivalent of Hindu Sansrkit *taukh{a-}rik{a-}, that is, a feminine adjective from the name tukh{a-}ra, the celebrated name of the rulers of Tokharastan.

Adams DQ, A dictionary of Tocharian B. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999 identifies <Jñ{a-}ti> as the personal name of a woman. E-mail correspondence with the author (included with the submission) justifies the order of <placename> <personal name>.

10: Viktor Kladivo - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Client requests authenticity for 15th-16th c. Bohemia.
• Sound (not specified) most important.
• Meaning (not specified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Three Mountains. He will not accept major changes, cares most about meaning and sound (none specified), and desires a male name. He would like his name made authentic for 15th-16th century Bohemia.

The following is summarized from the documentation section of the form:

'Viktor' is found in St. Gabriel report 2194

(http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?2194+0), which dates <Viktor> to 1356 in Russia and 15th-16th century in Poland using the following citations:

  • Paul Wickenden of Thanet, "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names", 2nd edition (WWW: SCA, Inc., 1996). http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/
  • Unbegaun, B. O., _Russian Surnames_ (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1971), p.48.
  • Walraven van Nijmegen and Arval Benicoeur, _Polish Given names in Nazwiska Polako/w_ (WWW: J. Mittleman, 1998). http://www.panix.com/~mittle/names/walraven/polish/
  • Taszycki, Witold (ed.), _S{l/}ownik Staropolskich Nazw Osobowych_, vols. I-VII (Wroc{l/}aw: Zak{l/}ad Narodowy Imienia Ossoli{n'}skich, Polska Akademia Nauk, 1965-1987), s.n. Wiktor.

'Kladivo' is found in Monumenta Vaticana res gestas Bohemicas illustrantia: ActaUrbani VI et Bonifatti IX, 1378-1404. Opera C. Krofta. 1903-05. 2 pts (http://books.google.com/books?id=ZKTzAAAAMAAJ&amp;vq=kladimo&amp;pg=PA1018#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false). dated to the 15th century. (Boar sez: this is not in a language I can read, so I can't verify or expand on what the submitter stated.)

The submitter adds: "Though there is no specific documentation that I was able to locate in reference to the bohemian region, my desire is to make the name for a persona from that region. Both the given name as well as the surname do have documentation for areas near bohemia and I feel that it would not be out of the question for the name to have been used in that region. "

10: Viktor Kladivo - New Device

Per chevron gules and sable, an owl's head cabossed and in chief three roundels argent.

Thus ends the May 2011 Internal Letter of Intent.

I remain,

yours in service,

Rhieinwylydd verch Einion Llanaelhaearn

Boar Pursuivant

An Tir OSCAR counts: 5 New Names, 3 New Devices, 2 New Badges. This gives 10 new items. Resub counts: 3 Resub Devices. This is a total of 3 resubmissions on this letter, for a total of 13 actions.

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