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An Tir IL dated 2009-09-05 (Jump to Submissions)

Unto Gwenlian Black Lion, Elizabeth Lions Blood, and the esteemed members of the An Tir College of Heralds to whom this missive comes, Lí Ban ingen Echtigeirn, Boar, sends greetings and felicitations.

COMMENTARY ON THIS LETTER IS DUE ON THE 10TH OF OCTOBER, 2009.

The following Lions Blood meetings will be held on at 1:00pm at Caitrina Lions Blood's new home (address TBA).

August meeting - Summits Fall Coronet - Gold Beach, OR (September 18-20, 2009; Lazy J Moore Ranch, 96029 Euchre Creek Rd, Gold Beach, OR)

September meeting - TBA

October meeting - TBA

November meeting - Summits 11th Night - Medford, OR (December 12, 2009; Medford Masonic Lodge, 975 N Pheonix Rd, Medford, OR)

Directions: For the July meeting, follow the directions given for the Lions Gate Sergeantry Trials event. For all others, see appropriate event copy and/or keep watch here for further instructions.

FROM LIONS BLOOD

Unto the An Tir College of Heralds, greetings and salutations, and fond wishes for a glorious end to our tournament season;

This is my very first missive to the College officially as Lions Blood, and I would like to thank Gwenlian Black Lion for placing her trust in me to take care of the submissions office as Caitrina and other have capably before me. Caitrina, your support and your teaching has been invaluable, and your willingness to let me train over the course of a few months has done wonders for my confidence to do the job properly.

To my teacher, Master Finngall, to Dames Juliana and Ursula and Her Ladyship Richenda, your advice and words of encouragement will not be forgotten. There is an element of nervousness that comes with taking any new office, but you have greatly reduced my fears.

To Ciaran, wherever he is watching, and to Christopher Queue Forchee, you were right - I did like the books a lot more than I originally thought I might.

I encourage all of you, no matter how much you think you know or don't know about heraldry or the submissions process, to try and make it to the monthly Lions Blood meetings. I intend for these meetings to start with the internal letter and end in some sort of social activity, so it will be a good time to learn about heraldry and your fellow heralds. The very first one will take place in the Shire of Tymberhavene, at Summits Fall Coronet, so bring your chairs and find us around the List Field - the time will be listed in the site copy. Similarly, if you would like to host a meeting in your local area, please contact me! I am willing to move it as far south as Ashland and Klamath Falls, and as far north as Seattle, and there are quite a lot of branches in between.

I am excited to serve the College and hope to open up the mystery of submissions to as much of An Tir as I can. Please do not hesitate to approach me if you have any questions or concerns, as I am hoping to speak with and meet as many of you as possible.

For Crown, Coronet and College,

Elizabeth Turner de Carlisle

LAUREL ACTIONS

The following is an excerpt from the cover letter of the May 2009 LoAR:

From Pelican: No More SCA-Compatibility

On the May 2008 Cover Letter, we ruled:

Therefore, as of the May 2009 decisions meetings, we declare that no new name elements or name patterns will be ruled SCA-compatible, that all names previously ruled SCA-compatible are no longer SCA-compatible and that in order for them to be registered, documentation meeting the same standards as for non-SCA-compatible names will be required.

This ruling went into effect with this, the May 2009 Pelican meeting.

From Pelican: Color Terms in Order Names

On the November 2008 LoAR, two submissions were pended, the Order of the Azure Glove and the Order of the Sable Sleeve. Both of these concerned the issue of color terms in order names. The original LoI demonstrated that both sable and azure (or asure) can be found in English contexts which are not purely heraldic, and cited the following precedents in support of the registerability of these order names:

Hidden Mountain, Barony of. Award name Award of the Azure Cloud (see RETURNS for badge). In general, names of heraldic tinctures are not registerable as part of order names where the language is English, because we have no examples of such usage and because the names of most heraldic tinctures were not used as ordinary adjectives in English until the very end of the 16th C. Azure appears to be the exception. According to the OED, the noun azure, meaning "A bright blue pigment or dye; ellipt. a fabric dyed of this colour", dates to at least the late 14th C. Chaucer mentions a figure "Cloothed in Asure". This and the citations provided by the submitter are sufficient to give them the benefit of the doubt that azure (like crimson) is used as an ordinary color name and hence is registerable as part of an order name. [LoAR 06/2006, Atlantia-A]

However, the August 2005 Cover Letter discussing patterns of period order names gives a stricter criterion for the use of color terms in order names:

Argent Snail, in arguing for more generous interpretations of patterns notes, "since we know that there were period order names of the form color (including Gold/golden) object, any color object should be considered acceptable, and not one step from period practice, even if the submitted color was not used in a period order name." While we are unwilling to extend the interpretation of period order names to include any color (images of "Order of Dead Spaniard Lion" leap to mind--"dead spaniard" being a fabric color found in Elizabethan England), we are often far stricter in our interpretations concerning colors than we are of other patterns. Therefore, since heraldic objects may be found in any heraldic tincture, the ordinary color name for any heraldic tincture may be used as part of an order name when combined with a heraldic charge (which, if applied to the example above, gives us the "Order of the Green Lion," a perfectly ordinary name.) Following this pattern comes with no penalty; even if a particular color found in heraldry is not found in any order name, its use in an order name still follows the established pattern. This does not overturn the precedent disallowing the registration of Orders of the form heraldic tincture name + object in English, since we have no examples of English order names that use heraldic tincture names. So, for example, while the Order of the Green Lion would be held to follow demonstrated patterns, Order of the Lion Vert or Order of the Vert Lion would not...[Order names for heraldic charges] may contain the ordinary color names of any heraldic tincture.

As noted in the pend of this order name, the June 2006 precedent demonstrates that azure or asure was used as a color term in English, but it does not show that this term was the ordinary color term for blue, as required by the August 2005 precedent.

When faced with contradictory precedents, the best way to arbitrate between them is to look to period practice. Since both the 2005 and 2006 precedents were set, our knowledge of medieval names of orders has increased dramatically, due largely to Juliana de Luna's article "Medieval Secular Order Names". In the introduction of the article, Juliana notes nine order names (making up 6% of the data) which follow the pattern <color> + <charge>. These nine orders are from Germany, France, Italy, and Navarre, so while they are few they come from a broad area and so can be taken as representative. So, what color names are used in these order names?

Black: noir (French)

Blue: blauwen (German), blaen (German)

Gold(en): or (French), goldin (English), golden (English), aureus (Latin)

Green: vert (French)

Red: roden (German)

White: blanche (French), blanco (Spanish)

These examples show that it was not any color term that was used in medieval order names, but just the single, ordinary color term. On the basis of period usage, we are upholding the stricter reading of the August 2005 Cover Letter, which is in keeping with the examples of period order names that we currently have. Order names which follow the <color> + <charge> pattern must use the ordinary color term for a heraldic tincture appropriate for the language of the order name.

From Wreath: Crosses and Substantial Difference

Given the widespread support for the proposal, we are implementing Batonvert's proposal on crosses that appeared on the Cover Letter for the August 2008 LoAR. Substantial difference under X.2 will henceforth be granted between crosses appearing below that do not belong to the same family. The families are:

- Plain crosses couped, including Latinate and humetty.

- Crosses flory, floretty, patonce, clechy, Calatrava, and Santiago.

- Crosses crosslet and bottony.

- Crosses moline, sarcelly, recercelly, anchory, fourchy, and miller.

- Crosses formy/paty. (see the note, below)

- Crosses doubled, patriarchal, and Lorraine.

- The cross potent/billety.

- The Tau cross.

- The cross of Calvary.

- The cross of Toulouse.

- The cross gringoly.

- The cross pomelly/bourdonny.

- The Maltese cross.

We note that, in period, the term paty could refer to crosses in the flory family. The formy/paty family is not intended to overlap these two groups, we are using the SCA blazon term.

Standard period variants of a particular style of cross will not be considered separate; no difference is granted for fitching, changing between equal-armed and Latinate, etc.

Substantial difference between crosses is not limited to the above list. It is, instead, intended to provide a set of guidelines on the most frequently seen crosses in heraldry. All rulings of substantial difference which are not addressed by the above list remain in force, as do all rulings on significant difference.

From Wreath: Sustained Charges

Da'ud ibn Auda, in September 1994, re-stated a precedent from Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme in the following manner:

Regarding the "significance" of the halberd, as Green Crown noted, a charge consisting mostly of a long skinny handle will always have difficulty matching the visual weight of other charges, but here the sizes of the charges are about the same as would be expected if they were in fess a bear and a halberd. That seems to be a reasonable rule of thumb for determining sustained (and qualifying for a CD), as opposed to maintained (and not qualifying for a CD), charges.

In the intervening years, this definition has been expanded to the point where any sustained charge is a co-primary charge. The College of Arms was asked to consider whether or not this policy made sense, or whether it made sense to introduce the idea that charges could be sustained secondaries.

Based on commentary, it does not appear that there is any easy way to solve this problem that improves the current situation without introducing new undesirable effects and complexity to our rules. We therefore decline to change the current state of the rules on this matter. Held items must be either sustained co-primaries, which count for difference, or maintained charges, which do not count for difference.

We remind the College that there are very few examples of held charges in period armory and that most examples are maintained. The use of sustained charges leads to an increase in complexity of processing submissions that is not desirable, especially since it does not follow a common period practice.

Anyone who feels that they have a proposal which is simple to understand, simple to apply, and which solves all the issues (or at least substantially improves the status quo) is invited to submit said proposal to the College for consideration.

Entwined charges are currently defined as having one charge primary and one charge maintained, unless it is explicitly stated in the registration or a comment. There are an increasing number of these secondary entwined charges, leading to a large increase of time as the person checking must research each potential conflict to see if it is a maintained or secondary entwined charge. This must be simplified. Therefore, in the case of entwined charges, we will adopt the proposal in this fashion:

- 'An X and a Y entwined' are co-primary charges.

- 'An X entwined of a Y' is a primary X and a secondary Y.

- 'An X maintaining an entwined Y' is a primary X and a maintained Y.

Transfixed charges follow a similar pattern as entwined charges.

- 'An X and a Y transfixed' are coprimary charges.

- 'An X transfixing a Y' or 'An X transfixed by a Y' is a primary X and a secondary Y.

- 'An X maintaining and transfixing a Y' or 'An X maintaining a transfixed Y' is a primary X and a maintained Y.

Existing armory using entwined and transfixed charges will be reblazoned on future LoARs as required and as time permits.

From Wreath: Charges for Laurels

On the Cover Letter for the November 2008 LoAR, we asked the College of Arms and the populace of the SCA to suggest a reserved charge for the Order of the Laurel, to parallel the pelican in its piety for the Order of the Pelican and the closed loop of chain and white belt for the Order of the Chivalry. Responses from the general populace varied, but responses from members of the Order of the Laurel were nearly unanimous: since the practice of using a charge as a symbol of their rank on the shield is not generally a period practice, they do not desire a charge reserved for them. Therefore, we will not reserve a charge for members of the Order of the Laurel. Period practice would be to display order badges around the shield as part of the achievement.

From Wreath: Unrestricting Chains and Pelicans

Also on the Cover Letter for the November 2008 LoAR, we asked the College of Arms and the populace to discuss removing the restrictions on closed loops of chain and pelicans as symbols for the Orders of Chivalry and of the Pelican, respectively.

Commentary from members of the College of Arms was mostly in favor of removing the restriction were it possible, but also cautioed that many members of the Chivalry, especially in certain geographical areas, viewed this practice as a perk of their rank.

Commentary from members of the general SCA populace was strongly in favor of retaining this ahistoric practice, mostly citing SCA tradition.

At this time, we decline to overturn the restriction and will continue to limit the use of these charges. The closed loop of chain, in any tincture, remains reserved to the members of the Order of the Chivalry, and the pelican, in any tincture, remains reserved to the members of the Order of the Pelican. We would again note that period practice would be to display the order badges around the shield as part of the achievement.

From Pelican: Pennsic Thanks

This year I made my first pilgrimage to Pennsic, something which I attempted with a bit of trepidation seeing as I was doing it from Drachenwald. I needn't have been worried at all: many people pitched in to help with my travel plans and I was wonderfully taken care of. I would like to specifically thank the following people for their help and care: Gisela vom Kreuzbach, who supplied me with tent-space, bedding, food, and tea; Margaret FitzWilliam of Kent and Edwin atte Bridge, whose combined efforts results in an air mattress and four sheep skins; Thomas Ouswood, who picked me up from and delivered me to the airport; Ailis Linne, for helping organize everything; Robin Gallowglass, who was instrumental in my meeting up with my new laptop; and Cecilia Abfalder, the best mom in the world, who took pity on a daughter who hates sewing and made me eight new underdresses just for War. Thank you, all, and I look forward to going back next year!

From Laurel, Pelican, and Wreath: Heraldic Display at Pennsic

This year at Pennsic, since Laurel, Pelican, and Wreath were all in attendance, we started what we hope will become a new tradition. The three of us took a long tour of Pennsic, looking at all the heraldic display that we could find. There was, to our joy, a great deal to see. We each chose two camps to honor with the first tokens from the heraldic sovereigns to thank those camps for exceptional use of heraldry. The following camps were so honored:

- Kingdom of the West

- Kingdom of Atenveldt

- Strawberry Fields (multi-kingdom camp)

- Lusty Wench Tavern (multi-kingdom camp)

- Vair and Ermine (multi-kingdom camp)

- Singing Stone and Lion's Tower (Æthelmearc)

We would like to thank them for the inspiration that they give not only to us, but to all who see their displays.

Society Pages

Congratulations to Gwenlliana Clutterbooke, Dragon's Mists Pursuivant and Sinister Gauntlet Pursuivant of An Tir, and Asbi{o,}rn inn eyverski, Thamesreach Pursuivant of Drachenwald, who were both award arms recently, in July and August, respectively.

As we previously announced, Julianna da Luna was elevated to the Order of the Laurel on July 18, 2009, at An Tir Coronation. She was invested with the Breakstone medallion, mentioned on the Cover Letter to the June 2003 LoAR.

The following items have been registered by Laurel

Aron Sinister. Name.

Listed on the LoI as Aron Wyth, the name was originally submitted as Aron the Sinister, and changed in kingdom because no documentation could be found for the Sinister. Commenters were able to find a version of the byname which is closer to the originally submitted form. Noir Licorne notes:

Senestre is closer to his originally submitted name:

"Submitted as Edward the Sinister, the submitter requested authenticity for 12th to 14th C and allowed minor changes. The LoI provided documentation for this byname from Weekley, Ernest, M.A., Surnames, (p. 304, footnote 3) which states: "Cf. Sinister, O.F. senestre, left-handed, awkward [Simon Senestre, of Dieppe, Close R.]. Lefthand is a ME. name." The LoI also noted that the Close Rolls dated to 1205. We have changed the byname in this submission to use the documented form Senestre in order to meet the submitter's request for authenticity." [Edward Senestre, 02/2003, A-Caid]

Siren adds to this:

I found a 1457 citation of a French <Colin Senestre>. It's from the Comptes du domaine de la ville de Paris, publiés par les soins du Service des travaux historiques de la ville de Paris, edited by Alexandre Vidier (Paris, Impr. nationale, 1948-). This is from the 1457-8 Comptes.

I'd say that this together with the English citation Jeanne Marie mentions should be enough to allow <Senestre>. The MED (s.n. senestre) gives this as a header form, but also dates <sinister> to 1474 (in the deceitful sense) and dates <sinistre> and <senester> to a. 1500 in the "left" sense. This should be enough to allow the spelling <sinister>, which is also the Latin spelling, as the MED notes.

On the basis of this information, Sinister is a plausible variant of the documented byname Senestre. We have changed the name to Aron_Sinister to make the byname closer to the originally submitted form.

Christopher Hawkwood. Name.

Heinrich Wilhelm. Device. Per bend argent and azure, five lozenges in bend bendwise sinister between two eagles counterchanged.

Please instruct the submitter to draw the charges larger so as to better fill the available space.

Sina di Andrea Valori. Name change from holding name Sina of Lions Gate.

The following items have been returned for further work

Aleyn Wykington. Device. Azure, on a plate between three mullets argent a hawk rising sable.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Steven of the Winged Hills, Sable, on a plate between three mullets argent an eagle displayed and sinister facing sable. There is one CD for changes to the field. Under the standards set on the Cover Letter to the November 2003 LoAR, "The two types of bird must have been drawn in fashions that were consistently very different from each other throughout period heraldry" if they are to have substantial difference. The primary difference between eagles and hawks in period heraldry is that eagles were nearly invariably drawn in the displayed posture and hawks were nearly always drawn as close, but there does not appear to have been much else that was different. According to Parker, "There are no conventional ways of representing the difference of the species of birds of prey in heraldic design." He also says that falcons and hawks are usually "represented with the appurtenances which belong to the art of falconry, that is, it is blazoned frequently as belled and jessed." Given that appurtenances are required to tell the difference, we conclude that the birds were not drawn differently. Since the bird types were not drawn differently in period, there is not significant difference between the two. Since only the posture is changed, there is not a CD under X.4.j.

It is also in conflict with Collette Ange de Helleville, Purpure, on a plate between three mullets argent a bird volant bendwise sinister sable, reblazoned elsewhere in this letter. There is one CD for the field. Since the bird in Collette's armory is drawn as a generic bird, there is no difference granted for just the change in posture.

It is not a conflict with the device of Thomas von Wörth, Azure, on a plate between four mullets, two and two, argent an owl sable. There is a CD for the change in number of mullets and a second CD for the change of type and posture of the bird.

Wealdsmere, Barony of. Order name Order of the Azure Glove.

This order name was pended on the November 2008 LoAR to obtain the College's commentary on the use of color terms in order names, and to discuss which of two contradictory precedents should be upheld. On the basis of period evidence, as found in Juliana de Luna's new article, "Medieval Secular Order Names", we are upholding the precedent set on the August 2005 Cover Letter which requires that the ordinary color name for a tincture be used. For a full discussion of the issue, please see this month's Cover Letter.

While the term azure is found in English contexts as a color term, and not just as a heraldic tincture name, azure is not the ordinary English name for the color denoted azure in heraldic contexts. The ordinary English name for that color is blue. In accordance with the precedent set on this month's Cover Letter, this order name would be registerable as Order of the Blue Glove. However, changing Azure to Blue is a major change, which the submitters do not allow.

Wealdsmere, Barony of. Order name Order of the Sable Sleeve.

This order name was pended on the November 2008 LoAR to obtain the College's commentary on the use of color terms in order names, and to discuss which of two contradictory precedents should be upheld. On the basis of period evidence, as found in Juliana de Luna's new article, "Medieval Secular Order Names", we are upholding the precedent set on the August 2005 Cover Letter which requires that the ordinary color name for a tincture be used. For a full discussion of the issue, please see this month's Cover Letter.

While the term sable is found in English contexts as a color term, and not just as a heraldic tincture name, sable is not the ordinary English name for the color denoted sable in heraldic contexts. The ordinary English name for that color is black. In accordance with the precedent set on this month's Cover Letter, this order name would be registerable as Order of the Black Sleeve. However, changing Sable to Black is a major change, which the submitters do not allow.

LIONS BLOOD ACTIONS

These items will be forwarded to Laurel, and are tentatively scheduled to be decided on in December of 2009.

Aneka of Seagirt. Name & Device, New. Azure, two chevronels ermine.

The given name is Finnish, dated to 1571. The locative is a branch of An Tir. Seagirt, Shire of was registered January 1990 (via An Tir) and updated to Seagirt, Barony of in May 2003 (via An Tir).

Avelyn de Mowbray. Name & Device, New. Quarterly purpure and vert, on a cross nowy argent a triquetra azure.

Avelyn is dated to 1379 in Withycombe s.n. Evelina, Evelyn.

Ursula Loyall notes the following: Reaney & Wilson s.n. <Mowbray> date <de Mumbray> to 1242, and the MED s.v. <erl marshal> dates the spelling <Mowbray> to 1460.

Basil Dragonstrike. Release of Armory, New. (Fieldless) A cutlass and overall a skull argent

This badge was registered January 2008 (via An Tir).

Basil Dragonstrike. Release of Armory, New. (Fieldless) A Norwegian lemming sejant erect per bend doubly arched sable and argent, mullety of four points counterchanged. [Lemus lemus]..

This badge was registered in June 1982 (via An Tir).

Caitilín inghean Chormaic. Name & Device, New. Vert, three bendlets enhanced and a bird migrant bendwise argent.

The patronymic was submitted as <Cormaic>; this was changed at Kingdom to reflect the correct lenited form.

The submitter's documentation is from OCM, s.n. Caiterína and s.n. Cormacc. OCM dates neither of these names to our period.

However, Ursula Loyall gives better documentation from Mari's Annals Article http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/. In this article, s.nn. Caitilín, the given name appears 10 times between the 15th and 16th centuries and under s.nn. Cormacc/Cormac, the father's name appears 28 times between the 8th and 16th centuries.

Chiara Fiamma. Name, New.

<Chiara> is found in De Felice, Emidio, dizonario del nomi italiano. According to De Felice, Claire of Assissi was known in Italy as <Chiara del Assissi> and the name became popularized by the saint's cult. Another saint, <Sancta Chiara di Montefalco>, who bore this given name died in 1308.

The given name can also be found dated to 1427 in the Florence Catasto, according to Arval's article "Feminine Given Names in the Online Catasto of Florence 1427" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto).

The byname is found once in the Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532 (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/TLSURNAM1.html).

Dagrún stjarna. Name, New.

The given name is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 9.

The byname is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 28.

Dietrich Eckhart von Katzenburg. Badge, New. (Fieldless) On a grenade sable flamed azure and Or a saltire couped Or.

The submitter's name was registered in January 2007.

His previous badge submission of (Fieldless) On an oak leaf vert an edelweiss argent seeded Or was returned for conflict as well as the style problem of a barely overall charge.

There was a great deal of commentary regarding this badge. The flames do not seem to be a period depiction, and the outline greatly resembles the grenade used by the US Army Ordinance Corps. We are unsure if this emblazon falls afoul of RfS VIII.4.b - Modern Insignia or RfS VII.7.b - Reconstruction Requirement. We leave this decision to Wreath.

Eamonn Leithghlinn. Name & Device, New. Azure, a chevron between in canton a fret and a dove regardant argent.

The given name is found in Mari's Annals Index 14 times dated between 1444 and 1559.

The locative byname was submitted as Leithglinn; we have changed it in Kingdom to Leithghlinn to match the submitter's documentation (also Mari's Annals Index).

Commenting heralds were of a consensus that the fret was not a period depiction, and the chevron could stand to be more pointed. The chevron appears to be drawn as it is to allow more space for the bird in base. We leave the decision to Wreath as to whether or not this device needs redrawn.

Godfrey of Wessex. Name, New.

The given name is dated to 1273 in Withycombe s.n. <Godfrey>.

The byname is a lingua anglica rendering of an Old English locative. The submitter requested authenticity for a 12th century Norman in England, however, Wessex did not exist as a territorial holding at that time as it ceased to exist after 1066.

Hauksgarðr, Canton of. Branch Name, New. (See RETURNS for device.)

The placename is constructed Old Icelandic/Old Norse meaning "stronghold/castle belonging to Haukr" or "stronghold/castle near a hill populated by hawks".

Haukr is a masculine given name in Geirr Bassi, p. 11. It is also an Old Icelandic word meaning "hawk" according to Zöega s.n. haukr (-s, -ar).

Garðr is a word meaning "stronghold, castle" according to Zöega s.n. garðr (-s, -ar). In the entry, there are two placename constructions cited using this element (Ás-garðr, Út-garðar).

Jódís in glaða. Name & Device, New. Purpure, a horse courant contourny within an orle argent.

The given name appears in Geirr Bassi, p. 12.

The byname appears in Geirr Bassi, p. 21.

The byname has been appropriately corrected for the feminine form.

Randolph of Sussex. Name & Device, New. Per bend bevilled azure and vert, in pale a bezant and a plate.

The given name is dated to 1201 in Withycombe s.n. <Randal>.

The locative byname is dated to 1296 in Reaney and Wilson, s.n. <Sussex>, as <de Sussex>.

The MED s.n. <of> (prep.) dates the use of this preposition in locatives to 1258 (Walt. of Cantelow).

Rose Atherton. Device, New. Azure, three decrescents in pale and on a chief argent a rose proper.

The submitter's name was forwarded to Laurel in April 2009.

There was concern over the sizes of the decrescents and the rose. We hope this only warrants an artist's note.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Order Name, New. Order of the Silver Sparkes.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Order Name, New. Order of the Silver Estoile.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Heraldic Title, New. Hafoc Herald.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

The name Order of the Hafoc was registered to the Principality in January 2005.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Heraldic Title, New. Red Flame Herald.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

The name Order of the Red Flame was registered to the Principality in July 2006.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Heraldic Title, New. Silver Pillar Herald.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

The name Order of the Silver Pillar was registered to the Principality in January 2006.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Heraldic Title, New. Silver Sparkes Herald.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

The name Order of the Silver Sparkes appears elsewhere on this letter.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Badge, New. (Fieldless) A flame gules.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

This badge is to be associated with Order of the Red Flame, registered to the Principality in July 2006.

The Principality has permission to conflict with Alanus of Bunghea (February 2000 via An Tir), Per chevron azure and Or, in base a flame gules. There is one CD for RfS X.4.a.iii. There is not a CD for placement of the flame per the following precedent: There is [no CD] for location on the field against a fieldless badge. [Aveline l'oisele, LoAR 11/2004, East-R].

This is not a conflict with William of Sark (January 1973) - Sable, a flame proper. The flame in William's device is Or with a tertiary gules flame. There is one CD for RfS X.4.a.iii, one CD for RfS X.4.i and one CD for RfS X.4.d.

Tir Rígh, Principality of. Badge, New. (Fieldless) A mullet of eight points azure fimbriated semy of sparks argent.

The Principality's name was registered in November 2002.

This badge is to be associated with Order of the Silver Sparkes, which appears elsewhere on this letter.

Two relevant style precedents:

1) A fieldless badge may be fimbriated:

[(Fieldless) On a cross moline argent fimbriated gules, a lion's head contourny sable] A cross moline is too complex to fimbriate. Note that being fieldless is not itself a reason to return a fimbriated charge; while the fimbriation is not needed to avoid a contrast problem, it is nevertheless a valid design feature. [Andrew Talbot, 07/99, R-Ansteorra]

2) A mullet of eight points can be voided/fimbriated:

[Argent, in pale a mullet of eight points voided and a ship within a bordure wavy azure.] A mullet of eight points is simple enough to void, though mullets with more points are not. [Uilliam mac Ailéne mhic Seamuis, 10/05, A-An Tir]

Úlfr Styrkársson. Name, Resubmission to Laurel & Device, Resubmission to Kingdom. Per bend sinister argent and gules, a winged wolf rampant contourny sable.

The given name is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 15.

The father's name, Styrkárr, is found in Geirr Bassi, p. 15.

The patronymic byname is formed correctly per the guidelines in Geirr Bassi, p. 17.

These items are being returned for further work

• Fionnghuala inghean Lochlainn. Device, New. Gules, on a pale sable fimbriated three equal-armed Celtic crosses Or.

This device is returned for conflict with the following: William of Grey Niche (August 1989 via Meridies) - Gules, on a pale sable fimbriated Or, in pale a decrescent argent and a dragon segreant Or and Amsterdam, City of (June 1995 via Caid) - Gules, on a pale sable three saltorels couped argent.

In each case there is a single CD by RfS X.4.j for the collective changes to the tertiary charges.

Hauksgarðr, Canton of. Device, New. Per fess indented argent and vert, a hawk striking contourny sable and a laurel wreath Or, on a chief sable a tower argent.

The device is returned for redrawing. The per fess indented line needs to be less severe with more indentations to give space for the hawk with the presence of the chief. The chief needs to be wider with more space for the tower. The hawk is also pixillated as if printed out on a color printer. Any one of these issues would probably warrant an artist's note, but together they should be redrawn so that the emblazon can be properly reconstructed.

Melisenda d'Argent. Badge, New. (Fieldless) On an estoile argent a fleur-de-lys purpure.

The submitter's name was registered in March 1995.

This badge is returned for violation of RfS VIII.3 - Armorial Identifiability. Consensus in commentary was that this no longer retained identifiability of an estoile with the wide arms, and that the arms were drawn in such a way so that the fleur did not overlap the edge of the estoile. The drawing of the primary charge blurs the line between estoile and sexfoil.

The following submissions received for the September Internal Letter are being returned for administrative reasons.

Harleigh Dhai. Device, New.

This device is being returned for lack of a name with which to go forward..

Seamus Blackwater. Name & Device, New.

This name name and device are administratively returned for lack of payment.

NEW SUBMISSIONS

1: Acacia Griffin - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Sound (as close to "ah-kay-shee-ah grif-ihn" as possible) most important.

The submitter's branch is Terra Pmaria.

The submitter will accept any changes, desires a feminine name and cares most about the sound of her name (as close to "ah-kay-shee-ah grif-ihn" as possible). She expresses no interest in having her name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"The Laurel Sovereign of Arms has previously ruled <Acacia> to be unregisterable barring evidence that it was used in period. The applicable precedent states:

""Acacia was documented as an undated feminine given name found in Francisca Arana de Love, Nombres Propios Españoles. Unfortunately, this book is a "baby name book". Undated names in this source are likely modern. While eveidence was found of the masculine names Acacius in Latin and Acacio in 16th C. Spanish, no evidence was found that a feminine form of this name, such as Acacia, was used in period. Further, Metron Ariston found that acacia was a type of tree in period, specifically that "acacia is primarily in Latin and thence in English a botanical term. The acacia tree or Egyptian pod-thorn was described by Pliny in antiquity and many medieval and modern platns drew their name from their similarity to that plant. Not all Latin masculine names had feminine equivalents that were used in period. In this case, given that we were unable to find evidence of Acacia used as a feminine name in period, combined with the use of acacia as a botanical term in period, it is unlikely that Acacia came into use in period. Therefore, lacking evidence supporting the use of Acacia as a feminine name in period, this name is not registerable." [Acacia D'Navarre - R, Lochac - July 2003]

"However, there is clear evidence that this given name was used as by the Greeks. The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (LGPN) shows both masculine <Aka/kios> and feminine <Akaki/a> used by real people in our period (http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/database/lgpn.php + search "Name starts with" <akaki>, display results in Unicode). According to the OED, Greek <Akaki/a> is the origin of Latinized <Acacia>. Since the masculine form of the Greek, <Aka/kios>, made it into the naming pool as <Acacius>, it stands to reason as possibly plausible that the feminine version, <Acacia>, also entered the naming pool. The MED dates the spelling of <Acacia> to 1398 in the medicinal sense.

"If it is still deemed that <Acacia> is unregisterable, I will accept the substitution of the given name <Agacia>. This given name is dated to 1273 in Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames by Talan Gwynek, Fause Lozenge Herald Extraordinary, under the header <Agatha>. (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyAG.html)

"The byname <Griffin> is dated to 1219 in Reaney & Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, s.n. Griffith."

Photocopies of the pages from the LGPN and the MED entry are included with this submission.

1: Acacia Griffin - New Device

Per saltire argent and sable, four dragonflies counterchanged

2: Basil Dragonstrike - New Badge

Per bend Or masoned sable and sable.

The submitter's branch is Porte de L'Eau.

The submitter's name was registered in November of 1980.

3: Basilius Fuchs - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Sound (unspecified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Madrone.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a masculine name and cares most about the sound of his name (unspecified). He expresses no interest in having his name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Basilius ~ http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/germmasc/plauen16.html

"Fuchs ~ http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottweilsur.html"

No photocopies of the articles were included with this submission.

[The Academy of Saint Gabriel article is "Late Period German Masculine Given Names" by Talan Gwynek. <Basilius> is found in the list of Christian names dated between 1551-1600. The other article is "German Names from Rottwiel, Baden-Würtemberg, 1441" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael. <Fuchs> is listed in this spelling with a frequency of 2. - Lí Ban]

3: Basilius Fuchs - New Device

Per Pale gules and vert. a phoenix proper or rising from flames on a pile inverted sable and a rapier proper sable

4: Bernadette Árd - Resub Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No major changes.

The submitter's branch is Lions Gate.

The submitter's previous name submission of Bernadette Eibhilin `Ard was returned by Kingdom in November of 2005 for faulty construction of a Gaelic name. The submitter's device of the same blazon was returned at the same time for lack of payment.

The submitter will not accept major changes and desires a feminine name. She expresses no preference should her name have to be changed, nor does she express any interest in having her name changed to be authentic. She will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"1. Academy of saint Gabriel Report 1911 (attached)

"2. The Illustrated Gaelic-English Dictionary page 44 (copy attached)"

Report 1911 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/1911 states the following: "<Bernadette> is a variant of <Bernardette>, a feminine form of <Bernard>. [1] It is found in Foix in the 14th century. [2] While we have no specific later examples of it, there was a modern saint <Bernadette> in the 19th century, so it is reasonable to believe that the name continued in use in your period. [1]…"

Reference [1] is Dauzat, Albert, Dictionnarie Etymologique des Noms de Famille et Prenoms de France (Paris: Libraire Larousse, 1987). s.n. Bernard, Mare/chal.

Reference [2] is Cateline de la Mor, "Names from Fourteenth Century Foix" (SCA: Trimarian Known World Heraldic Symposium, AS XXIX; WWW: J. Mittleman, 1997) [URL: http://www.panix.com/~mittle/names/cateline/foix.html].

The dictionary entry reads as follows: "†Ard, ** Aird, see Art.

"àrd, àird, n.pl. -a a. High, lofty, 2 Mighty, great, noble, eminent, excellent, supreme. 3 Proud. 4** Loud. Is esan a's àirde, he is the tallest; beinn àrd, a lofty hill; fuíl ard nan saoi, the noble blood of heroes; sealladh àrd, a proud look; fear a b'àirde guth, the man of loudest voice. Ard- answers to arch- as a prefix in English. Before an adj. as a prefix it supplies the place of an adv., as àrd-shona, supremely happy; àrd-éibhneach, ecstatic.

"àrd, àird, n.pl. of àird [& àrda] dat. pl. -aibh, s.m. see aired. 2. Chief, eminent person. Uaigh an àird, the chief's grave."

Photocopies of the Academy of Saint Gabriel report and the Gaelic-English dictionary were provided with this submission.

4: Bernadette Árd - Resub Device

Argent a semi of shamrocks, on a roundel vert four hearts in saltire conjoined at base Or

5: Ella atte Okenrode - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Meaning (Ella who dwells at the clearing in the oaks) most important.

The submitter's branch is Tymberhavene.

The submitter will accept any changes, desires a feminine name and cares most about the meaning of her name (Ella who dwells at the clearing in the oaks), and wishes her name changed to be authentic for 13th-14th century England. She will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Withycombe, E.G.; The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988) s.n. Ella

"Reaney, P.H. & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames, rev. ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995) s.n. Oakenroyd

"Talan Gwynek & Arval Benicoeur, "A Brief Introduction to Medieval Bynames" (www: Academy of St. Gabriel, 1999) http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/bynames

"Karen Larsdatter, "An Index to the 1296 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Rutland, England" (www: SCA Inc., 1998) http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Rutland"

The submitter also includes the following:

"Supporting Documentation: Ella atte Okenrode

"Withycombe has this to say about "Ella" in The Oxford Dictionary in English Christian Names, 3rd ed, s.n. Ella:

""The Norman-French christian name Ela, Ella or Ala, which was fairly common in England from the Conquest until about the middle of the 14th Century, was probably derived from the Old German Alia, a female name from the root alja `ali'. It was one of the medieval names revived in the 19th century by the Pre-Raphaelite writers, and has come into general use again. It is used in Ireland as = Ellie, a pet-form of Ellen." Then she cites the spelling "Ella" in 1196 and 1200 from the Curia Regis Rolls.

"Reaney & Wilson's A Dictionary of English Surnames, revised edition, s.n. Oakenroyd, Ockenroyd:

""Hugh del Okenrode 1323 LaCt. From Oaken Royd in Norland (WRY), or `dweller at the clearning in the oaks'. OE {a-}c, rod."

"Talan Gwynek and Arval Benicoeur, in "A Brief Introduction to Medieval Bynames", say the following about "atte":

""By far the most common preposition in medieval English usage was at, generally combined with the definite article as atte `at the' (or some minor variant). Typical examples are Attewode 1243 `at the wood' and Attemille 1242 `at the mill'. Many other prepositions also occur: Vnderegge 1194 `under edge', for someone who lived at the foot of an escarpment, Overthebek c. 1270 `over the beck (i.e., stream)', Bithewaye 1243 `by the way', for someone who lived by the road, and intheffelde 1333 `in the field' are good examples. Just about the least common preposition is of, though it does occur once in a while, e.g., othe felde 1327 `of the field' [3]. In most cases the preposition (and article, if present) were eventually lost; the full forms are rare after c. 1400. In a few cases they were fused with the noun, as in the modern names Atwood, Attwater, and Underhill."

"In addition, Jaren Larsdatter lists in her analysis of the 1296 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Rutland, England, 5 examples of the usage "atte + topographical feature"; three of these have a space between "atte" and the descriptor. These are "atte grene", "atte Wodegate" and "atte S[ou]thmilne|Sothmilne|Suthmilne". The topographical bynames can be found at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/Rutland/locatives.htm, beginning about midway down the page."

Photocopies of the Academy of Saint Gabriel aricle were included with this submission.

5: Ella atte Okenrode - New Device

Azure, two oak trees fructed and eradicated and in base three bars engrailed Or

6: Gabriella Margaurite Simonetti di Ruccellai - Resub Badge

(Fieldless) A horse's haed erased argent collared gules

The submitter's branch is Madrone.

The submitter's name was registered in June of 1992 as Gabriella Marguerite Simonetti Ruccelai.

Her previous badge submission of the same blazon was returned by Kingdom in July of 2009 for redrawing.

7: Gustav Man Lorn - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No holding name.
• No major changes.

The submitter's branch is Krakafjord.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a masculine name and cares most about the spelling of his name. He expresses no interest in having his name changed to be authentic. He will not allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Gustav is a modern Swedish spelling of the name headed in the SMP as Gustaf - Gøstaui is dated to 1302.

"Man - William Man is dated to 1141 in Reaney & Wilson s.n. Man

"Lorn - of Lorn is a surname in Symon Freser's "13th & 14th Century Scottish Names" URL to follow AEstel."

No photocopies or URLs were included with this submission.

7: Gustav Man Lorn - New Device

Argent, a bend vert overall a catamount's head couped contourny sable

8: Laric - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Sound (unspecified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Lions Gate.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a masculine name and cares most about the sound of his name. He expresses no interest in having his name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Misspelling of Alaric"

Included with this submission is a Wikipedia entry for Alaric I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaric_I) which has the following: "Alaric I (Alareiks in the original Gothic; Alarik or Alarich in modern Germanic languages; Alaricus in Latin; and Alarico in Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish), was likely born about 370 on an island named Peuce (the Fir) at the mouth of the Danube. He was king of the Visigoths fro 395-410 and the first Germanic leader to take the city of Rome. Having originally desired to settle his people in the Roman Empore, he finally sacked the city, marking the decline of imperial power in the west."

No further documentation was provided.

The device was colored with pencil crayons. The vert is indeed green, though a very dark one.

8: Laric - New Device

per pale, vert and azure with a sun or in chief

9: Macha the Determined - Resub Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No major changes.
• Language (8th-11th century Irish/Scottish) most important.
• Culture (8th-11th century Irish/Scottish) most important.

The submitter's branch is Mountain Edge.

The submitter's previous submissions of the same name and device were returned administratively by Kingdom in July of 2009 for being on the old forms.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a feminine name and cares most about the language/culture of her name (8th-11th century Irish/Scottish). She expresses no interest in having her name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Macha: URL for reference is http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/irish-obrien.html" [URL leads me to the SCA Heraldry welcome page. I am unable to determine what article is intended as none of the articles under `Ireland' or `Scotland' contain <Macha>. - Lí Ban]

No further documentation is provided.

9: Macha the Determined - Resub Device

Argent, within a dolmen gules a roundel azure

10: Macha the Determined - Resub Alternate Name

Macha ban Cyneweard

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No major changes.
• Language (8th-11th century Irish/Scottish) most important.
• Culture (8th-11th century Irish/Scottish) most important.

The submitter's branch is Mountain Edge.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a feminine name and cares most about the language/culture of her name (8th-11th century Irish/Scottish). She expresses no interest in having her name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"For Kennard, an old English equivalent is:

"Cyneweard ("royal guardian")

"source: The Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd Ed., P.H. Reaney and R.M. Wilson

"For Macha: http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/irish-obrian.html" [URL leads me to the SCA Heraldry welcome page. I am unable to determine what article is intended as none of the articles under `Ireland' or `Scotland' contain <Macha> that I could find. - Lí Ban]

11: Macha the Determined - Resub Badge

(fieldless) on a mountain couped a pine tree or

The submitter's branch is Mountain Edge.

The submitter's name may be found above on this letter.

The submitter's previous badge submission was returned administratively by Kingdom in July of 2009 for being on the old forms.

12: Marcus Andronicus - Resub Device

Lozengy Gules and Or two Griffins addorsed Tails Entwined, Sable.

The submitter's branch is Dragon's Mist.

The submitter's name was registered in May of 1992.

His previous device submission of Argent, on a flame gules an acorn argent charged with a goutte, all within a bordure purpure was returned by Laurel in May of 1992 for violating the layer limit.

This is a complete redesign.

13: Marcus Andronicus - New Badge

Sable on a lozenge Per Pale Or and Gules an Eagles head Sable

The submitter's branch is Dragon's Mist.

The submitter's name was registered in May of 1992.

14: Reme the Burgundian - Resub Device

Per Pal, Argent and Gules, a Fleur-de-lys counterchanged within a bordure sable semy of fleyr-de-lys Argent

The submitter's branch is Borealis.

The submitter's name was forwarded to Laurel in June of 2009.

His previous device submission was administratively returned by Kingdom in April of 2009 due to lack of funds.

15: Steinbjörn seiðrmund - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Language (Old Norse) most important.
• Culture (Old Norse) most important.
• Meaning (spell/magic hand) most important.

The submitter's branch is Coeur du Val.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a masculine name and cares most about the meaning ("spell/magic hand") and language/culture (Old Norse) of his name. He expresses no interest having his name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Steinbjörn - from Geirr Bassi s.n. Steinbjorn (p. 15 in 1977 ed)

"seiðmund - constructed name meaning "spell (magic) hand"

"Similar constructions (descriptor + body part) are found in Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók, by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman) (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html) e.g.

"* blákinn (swarthy-cheek)

"* dúfunef (dove-nose, dove-beak)

"*hǫggvinkinna (cut-cheek)

""seiðr" - from English - Old Norse Dictionary compiled by Ross. G. Arthur (http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/language/English-Old_Norse.pdf), p. 136 [This link spits out a bunch of garbage for me. When trimmed to http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/ I reached the main page for the "In Parentheses" section, from which I could navigate to the "Old Norse series", and from there to the "Old Norse Flashcards", which contains both elements: <mund> on page 7 and <seiðr> on page 131. - Lí Ban]

""mund" - from English - Old Norse Dictionary compiled by Ross. G. Arthur (http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/language/English-Old_Norse.pdf), p. 68" [This link spits out a bunch of garbage for me. When trimmed to http://www.yorku.ca/inpar/ I reached the main page for the "In Parentheses" section, from which I could navigate to the "Old Norse series", and from there to the "Old Norse Flashcards", which contains both elements: <mund> on page 7 and <seiðr> on page 131. - Lí Ban]

Photocopies of the article and the dictionary pages are included with this submission.

15: Steinbjörn seiðrmund - New Device

Bendy vert + argent, on a pile Sable a bear's paw print argent

16: Summits, Principality of the - Resub Order Name

Ordo Aeire

• No major changes.
• Sound most important.
• Language (Latin for "Order of the place called Aeria") most important.
• Meaning ("Order of the place called Aeria") most important.

The submitter's name was registered in November of 1992.

The submitter's previous submission of this name name was returned by Laurel on the October 2008 LoAR for conflict with Gleann Abhann, Kingdom of: Order of the Aries.

The submitter will not accept major changes to the name and cares most about the meaning, spelling and language/culture of the name (Latin for "Order of the place called Aeria")

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"The Principality's branch name was registered in November of 1992.

"This Order name was returned by Laurel in October of 2008 for conflict with "Order of the Aries" which is registered to the Kingdom of Gleann Aghann. A letter dated July 13th, 2009, signed by Loric and Diana, King and Queen of Gleann Abhann, granting the Principality permission to conflict is enclosed.

"<Ordo> is a Latin word which was used to mean "an order, a rank, class or degree of citizens", according to "A Latin Dictionary" by Charlton L. Lewis and Charles Short (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%3D%2332948)

<Aeria> is the Latin form of the French and English town name <Aire>. The town name probably derives from the medieval French and Anglo-Norman <aire> (http://www.anglo-norman.net/dict/AND-201-81B98305-44307E6E-D3747CCE-7CC17961?session=S3294881199285370). Examples of towns named <Aire> which existed in our period include <Aire-la-Ville> in Switzerland. This town was recorded as <Aeria Villa> in 1429 (http://www.hls-dhs-dss.ch/textes/f/F2883.php).

"In addition, Strabo mentioned a place called <Aeria> in his geography writings (http://maryjones.us/ctexts/classical_strabo1.html), as does Pliny the Elder in "A Natural History" (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=Plin.+Nat.+3.5). The place <Aeria> is also mentioned again in a writing called "The Great Eoiae" by Hesiod (http://omacl.org/Hesiod/frag2.html - Aeria is mentioned in fragment #10).

"In classical Latin, <Aeriae> is the genitive form meaning "of Aeria". In medieval Latin, the feminine first-declension genitive was often spelled with just <-e> rather than <-ae>, so <Ordo Aerie> is a reasonable medieval Latin form. The summary of medieval Latin grammar was provided by Dame Ursula Georges."

The letter of permission to conflict reads as follows:

"We, [mundane names redacted], known in the SCA as Loric Silvestris and Diana of the Isles, being King and Queen of the Kingom of Gleann Abhann, do hereby grant the Principality of the Summits permission for their Order name Ordo Aerie to sound similar but not identical to Our registered Order name Order of the Aries. We understand that this permission may not be withdrawn once the Principality's Order name has been registered.

"In witness whereof We set Our hands this 13th day of July, AS 44, known as 2009 in the Common Era."

It is signed by Loric and Diana.

Also included is the following letter:

"We, [mundane names redacted], known in the SCA as Brogan O'Bryant the Bull and Johanna Kjoppmanndtr, being Prince and Princess of the Summits, do hereby declare Our intent to register the Order names "Ordo Aerie", "Order of the Wings" and "Order of the Gryphon's Talon" to Our Principality.

"In witness whereof We set Our hands this 8th day of August, AS 44, being known as 2009 in the Common Era."

It is signed by Brogan and Johanna.

Photocopies of all the above webpages were included with this submission.

17: Summits, Principality of the - New Order Name

Order of the Gryphon's Talon

• No major changes.

The submitter's name was registered in November of 1992.

The submitter will not accept major changes and cares most about the spelling of the name (Gryphon as opposed to Griffin). No interest is expressed in having the name changed to be authentic.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"The Principality's branch name was registered in November 1992.

"The gryphon is a heraldic charge dating to 1244. <Gryphon> is a constructed spelling, based on the following argument (courtesy of Dame Ursula Georges): The OED s.v. <griffin>, I (http://www.oed/com, subscription required [URL should be http://www.oed.com/ -- Lí Ban) says that <gryphon> is found from the 1500s onward in the Spellings section. Dated spellings of the word from before 1650 in this entry are: `griffon', c. 1386; `grifphon, girffon, grefoun', c. 1400; `griffoune'c c. 1425; `gryffons', 1481; `griphin'. 1567; `griffon', 1601; `gryphin', 1620; `gryffoune', ?a 1400; `greffons' 1439; `gryffoun', 1460; `griffens', 1552; `griffin', 1640. This data shows that <y> and < i > could be used interchangeably for the first vowel, that <fph>, <ff>, <f>, and <ph> were all possible spellings of the /f/ sound, and that the final vowel could be spelled <o>, <ou>, < I >, or <e>. Thus, <gryphon> is also plausible as a constructed spelling.

"The MED s.v. taloun (n.) shows the plural form <talons> with the following dates under heading 2a and 2b: 1450, 1475, and 1486. We believe that the singular form <talon> would be remarkable for this time period. (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED44463).

"The front two legs of a gryphon are those of an eagle, and clearly possess talons. Therefore, we submit that a gryphon's talon is a reasonable heraldic charge, and thus falls within the acceptable meta-patterns as defined by the August 2005 Cover Letter. <Talon> has been used in Order and Award names as recently as October of 2005 (Award of the Sable Talon of Ansteorra)."

Included with the form is the following letter:

"We, [mundane names redacted], known in the SCA as Brogan O'Bryant the Bull and Johanna Kjoppmanndtr, being Prince and Princess of the Summits, do hereby declare Our intent to register the Order names "Ordo Aerie", "Order of the Wings" and "Order of the Gryphon's Talon" to Our Principality.

"In witness whereof We set Our hands this 8th day of August, AS 44, being known as 2009 in the Common Era."

It is signed by Brogan and Johanna.

Photocopies of all the above webpages were included with this submission.

18: Summits, Principality of the - New Order Name

Order of the Wings

• No major changes.

The submitter's name was registered in November of 1992.

The submitter will not accept major changes and cares most about the spelling of the name (Modern `wings' not Middle English `wyngs'). No desire is expressed to have the name changed to be authentic.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"The Principalitiy's branch name was registered in November of 1992.

"Meta-pattern: Orders named for Heraldic Charges (CL, August 2005)

"As a heraldic charge, Parker dates it twice to the grey period:

"1. Argent, on a pale azure three pairs of wings conjoined in lure of the first - B. POTTER, Bp. of Carlisle, 1629-1643.

"2. Gules, five marlion's wings in saltire argent - Sir Arthur PORTER of Newark(Guillim, 1612, p. 225).

"The OED s.v. wing dates the spelling <wings> to 1557 - in Dugdale Orig. Jurid. 1xx. (1666) 310 That none of the Companions except Knights or Benchers.. wear.. Wings in their Gowns

"This Order name is clear of "Order of the Raven's Wings" by removal of the descriptor `raven' and clear of "Award of the Silver Wings of Hawkwood" by removal of the descriptor (the locative does not count for difference)."

Included with the form is the following letter:

"We, [mundane names redacted], known in the SCA as Brogan O'Bryant the Bull and Johanna Kjoppmanndtr, being Prince and Princess of the Summits, do hereby declare Our intent to register the Order names "Ordo Aerie", "Order of the Wings" and "Order of the Gryphon's Talon" to Our Principality.

"In witness whereof We set Our hands this 8th day of August, AS 44, being known as 2009 in the Common Era."

It is signed by Brogan and Johanna.

Photocopies of all the above webpages were included with this submission.

19: Tomas Boniface - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Culture (England, 13th century) most important.

The submitter's branch is Montengarde.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a masculine name and cares most about the spelling and language/culture of his name (England, 13th century). He expresses no interest in having his name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"A Dictionary of English Surnames by P.H. Reaney & R.M. Wilson - page 53 lists - Tomas Boniface - 1190 - Alis Boniface - 1200

"(This is one of the books for which Laurel does not require a photocopy)

"(This book documents both the first and surname)"

An Tir OSCAR counts: 7 New Names, 2 New Order Names, 6 New Devices, 2 New Badges. This gives 17 new items. Resub counts: 2 Resub Names, 1 Resub Alternate Name, 1 Resub Order Name, 4 Resub Devices, 2 Resub Badges. This is a total of 10 resubmissions on this letter, for a total of 27 actions.

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