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An Tir IL dated 2009-05-06 (Jump to Submissions)

Unto Gwenlian Black Lion, Caitrina Lions Blood and the esteemed members of the An Tir College of Heralds to whom this missive comes, Lí Ban ingen Echtigeirn, Boar Herald, sends greetings and felicitations.

COMMENTARY ON THIS LETTER IS DUE ON THE 10TH OF JUNE, 2009.

The following Lions Blood meetings will be held on at 1:00pm at Caitrina Lions Blood's home (3174 Sechelt Dr., Coquitlam, BC).

April meeting - Sunday, May 17, 2009

May meeting - Sunday, June 14, 2009

June meeting - Sunday, July 12, 2009

Directions: Make your best way to Vancouver, BC. Get onto the Trans Canada Hwy (Hwy 1) if you're not already on it. Take the Lougheed Hwy exit (Exit 44). You should be going NE. Follow Lougheed Hwy until it turns into Pinetree Way. Follow Pinetree Way to Guildford Way. Turn right. Follow Guildford Way to Ozada Ave (Guildford Way turns into Ozada Ave.). Follow Ozada Ave. to Inlet St (first right). Turn right. Follow Inlet St. to Sechelt Dr. (first left). Turn left. Look for #3174.

Alternatively, follow the directions provided courtesy of Google Maps:

http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=3174+Sechelt+Dr,+Coquitlam,+BC,+Canada&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=33.029007,88.769531&ie=UTF8&z=16&iwloc=addr&om=1

FROM LIONS BLOOD

Greetings unto the An Tir College of Heralds from Caitrina Lions Blood!

This has been a very difficult month for me physically and I'd like to thank everyone who assisted me by letting me forward issues to them to investigate so that the minimal time I was allowed to sit in front of a computer was used for working on the Letters of Intent, and to those who picked up where I faltered and ensured nothing got forgotten, I thank you as well. This College is an awesome group of people who not only work well as a team but as a family. I am most honoured to be in your company.

In Service to Kingdom and College,

Caitrina Lions Blood

LAUREL ACTIONS

The following is an excerpt from the cover letter of the January 2009 LoAR:

From Laurel: Consequences

It is our unhappy duty to announce that the Ealdormere Letter of Intent which was published to OSCAR on November 23, 2009, must be returned administratively in its entirety. This sad state of affairs comes about because we received neither payment nor a packet of forms from them by the third deadline.

We remind Principal and Submissions Heralds that we are unable to process what we don't receive, and we are unwilling to postpone consideration of a letter indefinitely.

All commentary, obviously, remains in OSCAR, and will be considered if any of these submissions are resubmitted unchanged.

From Pelican: What does the lingua anglica allowance cover?

The lingua anglica allowance is one which generates perennial confusion. To ameliorate this, we'd like to give a brief sketch of the history of the lingua anglica allowance and explain how it is currently being treated.

As the March 1993 Cover Letter says:

A few recent registrations have left some commenters wondering about the exact status of the College's lingua franca rules. Originally, these were simply the acknowledgement of a hard fact: that the grand majority of SCA folk speak modern English, not Russian, Saxon, Latin, Old Norse, or whatever. The principle was first expressed as a Board ruling (after they'd received correspondence written in medieval Latin!), and codified in the 1986 edition of the Rules for Submissions.

The 1986 edition of the Rules says:

The official language of the Society is and shall be correct modern English. ... Simple particles, such as 'of', may be used without necessarily increasing the counted number of languages contained in the name. The formula, whatever the original languages, is acceptable. This is the usual historian's manner, and therefore Otto of Freising is a familiar form, though he would have been Otto von Freising or some other more German or Latin version in most contemporary documents. [NR1]

This rule was retained in the current Rules, which say:

In the case of place names and other name elements frequently used in English in their original form, an English article or preposition may be used. For example, of Aachen might be used instead of the purely German von Aachen [RfS III.1.a].

The lingua anglica allowance was extended on the January 1993 Cover Letter:

The use of lingua franca translation is extended only to single, simple descriptives. Given names, for instance, may not normally be translated into their putative meaning: e.g. Bear may not be used as a given name, even though it's the lingua franca translation of the given name Björn. Placenames, hereditary surnames, and bynames from different languages (e.g. French and German) likewise don't fall under the lingua franca allowance.

It was further clarified on the June 2002 Cover Letter to allow the translation of locative bynames documented in a non-English language into English, using the English form of the place name. For purposes of determining linguistic compatibility, the translated byname is treated as if it were still in the original language:

In the case of William of Saxony, this name would be considered a mix of the English William and the German von Sachsen. As mixing English and German in a name is registerable with a weirdness, this name has one weirdness for the lingual mix. Rendering von Sachsen as of Saxony via Lingua Anglica does not carry a weirdness. Therefore, this name has one weirdness and is registerable.

In the case of Wilhelm of Saxony, the name combines the German Wilhelm with the German byname von Sachsen. Rendering von Sachsen as of Saxony via Lingua Anglica does not carry a weirdness. Therefore, the name has no weirdnesses and is registerable.

In the case of Rhys of Saxony, this name combines the Welsh Rhys with the German byname von Sachsen. As mixing Welsh and German in a name is not registerable, this name is not registerable under the Lingua Anglica Allowance.

To summarize, the following are all acceptable instances of the lingua anglica allowance:

- The use of a non-English place name or other name element frequently used in English in its original form with an English article or preposition (RfS III.1.a).

- An accurate modern English translation of a documented, non-English locative byname, using the modern English name for the location (CL 06/2002).

- An accurate modern English translation of a documented, non-English, simple, descriptive byname (CL 01/1993).

Note that in all cases, in order for the lingua anglica allowance to be invoked, the non-English name element or elements in question must be documented:

This byname could be considered a Lingua Anglica rendering of a byname formed from a tribe name. However, to appeal to the Lingua Anglica allowance, documentation must be provided to support the byname in the original language. Only then may a Lingua Anglica form be determined. [Tomyris of the Sauromatae, 01/2004, R-East]

This has long been our policy and it is not our intent to change the policy, just to clarify it.

From Wreath: Tincture and Tertiaries

A submission this month caused the re-examination of the precedent on changing tincture for tertiaries:

[Purpure, on a chevron between two Celtic crosses and a ferret rampant Or three thistles proper]. Conflict with Marina la Perdue, Purpure, on a chevron between three mullets of six points Or, three fleurs-de-lys purpure. There is one CD for adding the secondary charges around the chevron. This submission is not simple for RfS X.4.j.ii to give a CD for change in tertiary type alone, so any CD from the tertiaries must derive from X.4.j.i. RfS X.4.j.i requires two changes to the tertiary charge group for a CD. There is a change in tertiary type between these two pieces of armory, but not enough change in tertiary tincture to count towards the second necessary X.4.j.i change. The thistles in this submission have more than the usual proportion of purpure. The globular portion of the thistle, which is vert in nature and in a standard heraldic depiction, is purpure in this emblazon. The flower portion is also purpure, and therefore the thistles are almost half purpure. The text in X.4.j.i requires that any changes "generally" affect the whole group. [Catrina of Whitemoor, 10/2001, R-Meridies]

This precedent has since been interpreted to mean that, if the two tertiary groups share any tincture in common, they are not granted a CD for any changes to tincture. However, since then, other precedent was set on what change of tincture means:

[Accepting (Fieldless) A decrescent per pale azure and argent] This badge does not conflict with Rhiannon ui Neill, (Fieldless) A decrescent azure. While X.4.d is most often interpreted as requiring half the charge to change tincture in a single-charge design, the wording of the rule states that "changing the division of any group of charges placed directly on the field is one clear difference." While much more than half the charge is azure, this is a properly constructed per pale line of division. Therefore there is a CD for fieldlessness and there is a CD for the change of the line of division, from no division to per pale, and thus these two pieces of armory are clear. [May 2006, Kiena Gledston, A-Caid]

Therefore, we have decided to overturn the October 2001 precedent. Henceforth, when considering whether tincture changes count for the difference of tertiary charges using X.4.j.i, there are two guidelines: all of the charges in the group must change and the change must be the sort of change that would yield a CD when applied to primary or secondary charge groups. If both of these guidelines are met, then the tincture change will count as one of the two changes required under X.4.j.ii.

From Laurel: Society Pages

At An Tir's Kingdom Arts and Sciences Championship on Saturday, March 7, 2009, Juliana de Luna, Siren and Palimpsest Herald was placed on vigil for elevation to the Order of the Laurel. Her induction to that order will happen at An Tir's coronation July 17-19, 2009.

Elzbieta Rurikovskaia, Aten Principal Herald, will ascend the throne of Atenveldt on May 1, 2009.

On March 18, 2009 at Gulf Wars, Herrin Gisela vom Kreuzbach, Laurel Education Deputy and Kraken Herald of Atlantia, was inducted into Atlantia's Order of the Golden Dolphin. This order is a grant-level order for service.

On April 4, 2009, at Calontir's Heraldic, Scribal, and Dance Symposium, Inez Alfon was inducted into the Order of the Cross of Calontir. This order is a grant-level order for service.

The following is excerpted from the February 2009 cover letter:

From Laurel: Society Pages

On Saturday, April 18, 2009 Lady Matilda Bosvyle de Bela Acqua, Silver Buccle Principal Herald of Æthelmearc, was issued a writ for elevation to the Order of the Pelican. She will be inducted into the Order on June 27.

The following items have been registered by Laurel

January 2009

Aline Blakwode. Device. Argent, a cross of four lozenges vert.

She has permission to conflict with the device of Ealhswith of Evesham, Argent, four lozenges in cross purpure.

Althaia filia Lazari. Device. Azure, a kingfisher rising argent within a torse wreathed argent and sable.

This device is clear of Rorik Fredericsson, Azure, a grey goose volant bendwise wings addorsed proper gorged of a coronet Or. Based on the November 2003 Cover Letter ruling on birds and substantial difference, the kingfisher falls in the "regular-shaped birds" category and geese fall within the "swan-shaped birds" category. Since there is substantial difference between these bird types, these devices are clear by X.2. If we count CDs, there is one of the change of type of bird and another for the addition of the torse.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Order name Order of the Shattered Spear.

As the Order of the Shattered Shield is already registered to the kingdom, the construction Order of the Shattered X, where X is a tool of attack or defense, is grandfathered to them.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Badge for Hunt Guild of An Tir. (Fieldless) A hunting horn sable, stringed Or.

Hunt Guild of An Tir is a generic designator.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Release of heraldic title Vox Leonis Herald.

Caemgen mac Garbith. Name and device. Vert, a leonine sagittary passant Or and a chief potenty Or semy-de-lys azure.

Caemgen is the Old and Middle Irish form of a name of which the only examples in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals", are from the Oghamic Irish era. There was some question whether Caemgen was registerable, given that precedent says:

The given name was submitted in a Middle or Old Irish form, but the only example we have found of the name Cnes is of an early 6th century mother of a saint. During the 6th century, the language in use in Ireland was Oghamic Irish; Cnes is an Old Irish spelling (appropriate for c. 700 to c. 900). We have no evidence that the name continued into use into the period when an Old Irish spelling in appropriate. Current precedent does not allow registration of Irish names in orthographies that are not appropriate to the times in which they are found. [LoAR 01/2008]

In the case of Caemgen, Ó Corráin & Maguire, Irish Names, s.n. Cáemgen note that "the principal bearer of this name was St Cáemgen (Kevin), abbot and founder of Glendalough, whose feast-day is 3 June. There is another saint of the name whose feast-day is 11 May." Precedent from the September 2001 Cover Letter concerning the use of saint's names says "given names which can be documented as the given name of a saint may be registered as a given name. The use of a name documented as a saint's name carries no weirdness in and of itself. The only weirdnesses that derive from using that name come from the lingual mix of the submitted form of the saint's name with the rest of the submitted name." The idea behind this is that names of saints can be assumed to have remained familiar and known to the culture venerating the saint throughout our period, meaning that the saint's name is, potentially, available in that culture's name pool. This means that the Old or Middle Irish form Caemgen is registerable, despite the fact that we have no examples of real people using this name in the Old or Middle Irish era.

Eawyn rindill. Device. Gules, a swan argent and on a point pointed Or a triskele sable.

The LoI failed to mention the tincture of the point pointed. As a color emblazon was posted, the commenters were able to conflict check using the correct tincture and this need not be pended for further conflict checking.

Elewys Cuylter of Finchingefeld. Device. Per bend sinister vert and lozengy vert and argent, in chief a pair of shears fesswise reversed argent.

Elizabeth de Summerlege. Name and device. Purpure, on a bend between two quatrefoils argent three crescents palewise sable.

This device is clear of Caitlin Ruadh, Purpure, on a bend argent three decrescents palewise gules. There is a CD for the addition of the secondary quatrefoils and a CD under X.4.j.i for the change from decrescents gules to crescents sable.

Nice armory!

Heinrich von Arenberg. Name.

Kate the Candelmaker. Name and device. Per bend gules and azure, a lit candle in a candlestick and a standing balance Or.

There was some question of whether this design violates our ban on so-called "slot machine" designs, having three types of charge in a single group. Like a bow and arrow, the candle and candlestick have independent heraldic existence but, when placed together in their expected arrangement for use, are considered a single design element and count as a single charge for purposes of the complexity rule. This device is, therefore, registerable.

Magdelena von Freiberg. Name and device. Per chevron azure and sable, a chevron argent between two bezants and a tree blasted and eradicated Or.

Tifanie de la Mare. Name and device. Per pale azure and argent, a sea-wolf counterchanged.

Tita the Wanderer. Device. Azure, two dances argent between three daisies proper.

William Mor. Name and device. Per pale azure and argent, an eagle between three mullets all within an orle counterchanged.

Wilrich von Hessen. Household name Fraternitas domus Sancti Jacobi Germanorum Acconensis.

Submitted as Fraternitas domus Sancti Jacobi Germanorum Acconis, the submitter requested authenticity for a 12th C German crusader company. We would like to commend the submitter on his research, the result of which is that he probably knows more about 12th C German crusader company names than Pelican does. Part of the submitter's documentation included a 1227 reference describing the Teutonic Knights as religiose fraternitatis hospitalis sancte Marie Theotonicorum Ierosolimitani 'of the religious brotherhood of the Jerusalemish hospital of Saint Mary of the Teutonics'. The submitted name is patterned on this description, substituting domus 'house' for hospitale 'hospital, guest house', and changing the city, the saint, and the ethnic designator. However, the substitution of Acconis for Ierosolimitani does not follow the grammar of the 1227 reference. Ierosolimitani is not the genitive form of Jerusalem, but rather an ethnic adjective modifying hospitalis. To follow this pattern, Acconis 'of Acre' should in fact be an ethnic adjective modifying domus. Metron Ariston provides information on what the correct form of that is:

The answer, of course, is in the Historia Rerum in Partibus Transmarinis Gestarum of William of Tyre. Conveniently, in the first chapter of Book XXIII of that work, William says "ab urbe discesserant Acconensi" (http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/williamtyre/23.html). Since this adjective follows the third declension pattern, the feminine genitive singular would be Acconensis.

We have changed the name to Fraternitas domus Sancti Jacobi Germanorum Acconensis to correct the grammar. We cannot confirm that this household name is authentic for the 12th century, but given the 1227 reference quoted above, the submitted name appears to be plausible for the early 13th C.

In this submission, both Fraternitas 'brotherhood' and domus 'house' could be considered as designators, for the purposes of RfS III.2.b. Past precedent has ruled that non-personal names cannot have two designators, barring documentation for such use:

[Companionate of the Pilgrims of Compostela]. This is being returned for non-period style. Taking this at face value, "Companionate" is the designator and "Pilgrims of Compostela" is the substantive portion of the name. This pattern follows no know [sic] period exemplars. If we regard both "Companionate" and "Pilgrims" to be designators then there is the problem of using two designators (a possibility which the RfS don't seem to take into account, and which at the least requires some justification). [LoAR 10/1997, Meridies-R]

[Chateau de Normandy, Shire of] This is being returned for several reasons. First, this combines two designators, Shire and Chateau. Barring documentation of such a combination, it must be returned. [LoAR 04/1998, Meridies-R]

In the 1227 citation, both fraternitas and hospitale could be considered designators. Since the submitted name is patterned on a period description, this gives sufficient documentation for the registration of this household name with two designators.

February 2009

Ælfflæd Ælfgaresdohtor. Badge. (Fieldless) A hare sejant contourny Or.

Anabel Hastings. Name and device. Or, a maunch and on a chief urdy azure three lions passant Or.

The tincture of the chief was omitted from the LoI and not corrected. Thanks to the color emblazon on OSCAR, enough commenters noted that the chief is azure, and conflict checked it as such, that we can register the device.

Please instruct the submitter to draw fewer and larger repeats on the urdy line of division.

Aodh Deoradhán. Badge change. Per bend sinister dovetailed sable and vert.

When fields with low contrast are used, complex lines of division are accepted on a case-by-case basis. In this case there are no charges obscuring the line of division and the line of division is clearly drawn. Since the there is sufficient contrast between the sable and vert here, this badge is acceptable.

His old badge, (Fieldless) A comet palewise sable bearded vert the estoile charged with an uncial lowercase "a" Or, is released.

Aonghus Mac Aonghuis. Device. Gyronny Or and gules, a stag springing and a bordure sable.

Argento Brunelli. Name and device. Azure, an anchor fouled of its chain and on a chief embattled argent an arrow azure.

The forms indicated that if the name had to be changed, the submitter cared most about the sound "Argent Brunkell". The name is registerable as submitted, but if the submitter is interested in a byname that sounds more like "Brunkell", we can suggest an alternative. Red Hawk notes that Bahlow, A Dictionary of German Names, s.n. Brunckhorst dates W. Brunkel to 1261. The byname derives from a place in Alsace. Argento Brunkel would be registerable with one step from period practice for combining Italian and German.

Bartolomea di Antonio Rossini. Name and device. Lozengy Or and azure, a chief azure.

The submitter requested authenticity for Florence, 1468. All of the elements can be found in the Florentine Catasto of 1427, and the construction is typical for the 15th C. We can confirm that this is an excellent name for her place and period.

There were calls for an inspection of the armory of Cecilia Blythe, Or fretty, a chief azure for a possible visual conflict. The primary charge in Cecilia's armory is definitely fretty, and the two devices are definitely visually clear, as well as being technically clear by X.1, for removal of the fret.

Bj{o,}rn Styrkarsson. Name and device. Per fess sable and argent, a bear rampant between three sheaves of arrows counterchanged.

Submitted as Bjorn Styrkarsson, the documentation for the given name, Geirr Bassi Haraldsson, The Old Norse Name, spelled the name Bj{o,}rn. In Old Norse, {o,} is not an o with an accent, but a distinct character separate from o, which looks like an o with a reverse comma hook. The two letters o and {o,} are not generally interchangeable. While the submitter allowed no changes, he explicitly requested that the given name be corrected to the documented form, so we have changed the name to Bj{o,}rn Styrkarsson in order to register it.

Brighid of Garnsey. Badge. (Fieldless) On a crescent azure a pale Or.

Cormacc ua Néill. Device. Purpure, a ram's head cabossed and in chief two shamrocks argent.

Cristina Izarra. Name.

Dietrich Eckhart von Katzenburg. Badge. Or, three trees blasted and eradicated sable between two scarpes azure.

Eva van den Berg. Name.

This does not conflict with Eva van Brugge, registered October 2008. Because Brugge and Berg are significantly different in sound and appearance, the two bynames do not conflict per RfS V.1.a.ii.

Geoffrey Albryght. Device. Per bend sinister argent and sable, a bend sinister gules cotised between a dragon contourny and a tree eradicated counterchanged.

Grace Dudley of Bolton. Name change from Gráinne Gelleo.

Her previous name, Gráinne Gelleo, is retained as an alternate name.

Ketilelf Grathe. Name.

Nice 12th C Danish name!

Leiðólfr Kvígsson. Name and badge. Argent, a tower azure and a base wavy sable.

Listed on the LoI as Leiðólfr Kvigarson, both the forms and the documentation showed the accent on the byname: Kvígarson. The genitive of Kvígr is Kvígs, not Kvígar. Additionally, precedent requires that accents in Old Norse names be used or dropped uniformly throughout, we have restored the accent to the byname. We have changed the name to Leiðólfr Kvígsson in order to register it.

Lianor de Najera. Name and device. Argent, a coney courant to sinister and on a chief azure two crescents Or.

This name combines Portuguese and Spanish. This lingual combination has not yet been ruled on as to whether it is registerable, registerable with a step from period practice, or not registerable. While there are some differences in orthography between Portuguese and Spanish, in many cases, the Spanish and Portuguese forms of names are identical, and without knowing the original context of the name it is often impossible to tell whether the name is Spanish or Portuguese. When the precedent saying that English/Scots combinations were a step from period practice was overturned, Laurel said:

This name mixes an English place name with an otherwise Scots name; such a mixture was declared one step from period practice in September 2001. However, many Scots name forms are identical to English name forms. Furthermore, many of the standard sources used by the SCA College of Arms, including the Oxford English Dictionary and Reaney & Wilson, Dictionary of English Surnames, make no distinction between English and Scots forms. We are therefore overturning this precedent, and declaring that names combining Scots and English forms are no longer considered a step from period practice. [Michael Duncan of Hadley, Caid-A, LoAR 04/2004]

The situation with Spanish and Portuguese is similar. Siren comments:

The naming pools [of Spanish and Portuguese] are so similar and the spelling conventions overlap so much that it's hard to say what's parallel development and what's combination. In [Aryanhwy's] 1565 Lisbon census, nine of the top fifteen names have at least one documentary form identical to one from the Isabel data; all the rest have close cognates, which differ by a letter or two (except Simi{a~}o/Simon). You have to go down below the 25th most common name (to Belchior, which I assume is Melchior in Spanish, and is not in use by then) to find one that does not have a close cognate in the Isabel data (noting that <Bras> and <Blas> are the same).

Borrowed the other way, we have <Donis> in Isabel from Portuguese <Dinis> (Dionysius is what it's derived from) and the probably Portuguese influence <Nicolao> as a Nicolas variant.

Given the high amount of overlap between both naming pools and name patterns, the substantial contact between Spanish and Portuguese speakers throughout a large part of our period, and the similar orthographies, we rule that names combining Spanish and Portuguese are registerable without a step from period practice.

Please inform the submitter to draw internal detailing on the rabbit. Also, rabbits usually have their ears attached to the top of their head, not near the rear base of the skull.

Marguerite fitz William. Device. Or, a natural panther statant contourny sable, on a chief engrailed vert three plates.

Mary Ostler. Device. Per fess ermine and purpure, a turnip proper leaved vert.

Otto Vogt. Name and device. Per bend sinister sable and gules, a garb argent and a bordure argent semy of wolves' heads erased sable.

Please instruct the submitter to draw better internal detailing on the garb.

Ronan mac Carthaich. Name and device. Vert, a double-arched bridge throughout argent masoned sable between three mermaids in their modesty and a stag's head couped argent.

Shannan O'Duncan. Device. Purpure, two rapiers in saltire Or and in chief a mushroom argent.

Shannan O'Duncan. Badge. (Fieldless) A mushroom purpure.

Styrkarr jarlsskald. Name and device. Counter-ermine, a wyvern and in chief three mullets of eight points argent.

Submitted as Styrkarr Jarlskald, the byname Jarlskald was documented from a translation of the Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson from Icelandic into English. This translation does not retain the original spellings of the names, but rather converts them into modern form. Geirr Bassi Haraldsson, The Old Norse Name, gives two forms of this byname: jarlaskáld and jarlsskáld. Since jarlsskáld is closer to the originally submitted form, we have changed the name to Styrkarr jarlsskald in order to register it. We have dropped the accent from the byname because precedent requires that Old Norse names use or drop accents uniformly throughout.

There was some question whether the byname "earl's poet" was presumptuous, violating RfS VI.1, which says that "Names containing titles, territorial claims, or allusions to rank are considered presumptuous...In some cases, use of an otherwise inoffensive occupational surname in a territorial context may make it appear to be a title or rank, such as John the Bard of Armagh or Peter Abbot of St. Giles." So far as we have been able to tell, jarlsskald is neither a title nor a rank, but merely an ordinary occupational byname. Lacking evidence that the skald of a jarl would have been considered higher in rank or prestige than, say, an ordinary skald, the use of the byname jarlsskáld or jarlaskáld is not presumptuous.

The wyvern is statant, which is the SCA default for wyverns.

Summits, Principality of the. Order name Order of the Shield of the Summits (see RETURNS for other order name).

The principality has permission to conflict with Shield Herald, registered to the Kingdom of the Middle in August 1993.

Tymothy of Dover. Device. Azure, a ram rampant sustaining a staff of Aesculapius, tip enflamed argent.

The staff of Aesculapius is considered a single charge, and thus this device cannot suffer from the so-called slot machine problem, since there are only two charge types in this device.

The device is clear of Lucais du Belier, Azure, two rams combattant within a bordure argent, with a CD for removing the bordure and another for changing the type of half the charges.

Tymothy of Dover. Badge. (Fieldless) A ram rampant sustaining a staff of Aesculapis argent.

The staff of Aesculapius is considered a single charge, and thus this device cannot suffer from the so-called slot machine problem, since there are only two charge types in this device.

Zachary le Bigod. Device. Purpure, a phoenix facing sinister Or rising from flames proper and in chief two harps addorsed argent.

Zachary le Bigod. Badge. Purpure, four harps in cross argent.

The following items have been returned for further work

January 2009

An Tir, Kingdom of. Order name Company of the Shattered Lance.

This is returned for lack of documentation that Shattered Lance is a plausible name for a company. The kingdom already has registered to them the Order of the Shattered Shield, and therefore the pattern of Order of the Shattered X, where X is a tool of attack or defense, is grandfathered to them. However, this grandfathering does not extend to company names, which use different patterns of names than order names do. This would be registerable as Order of the Shattered Lance, but changing this from a company to an order has significant consequences on who is allowed to be a member, and we are reluctant to do so without explicit approval of the kingdom.

February 2009

Glymm Mere, Barony of. Order name Order of the Iron Wolf.

This is returned for lack of evidence that it follows period patterns of order names. The LoI provided the following documentation for the order name:

The wolf is a standard, recognizable period charge. The word "iron" is found in period with the appropriate meaning, generally as a descriptive adjective in English names. As used, it appears to refer to a quality, rather than a color. Reaney and Wilson s.n. Ironfoot lists the following bynames: Yrenfot 1251 'iron foot'; Irenherde 1379 'hard as iron'; yreneman 1327 'iron hand'; Yrento 1209 'iron toe'. In addition, s.n. Ironside there's Irenside 1057, 1297, 1333, 1350 'iron-side, warrior'. The Barony therefore believes that 'Iron Wolf' is a reasonable order name, referring to a wolf that is as hard as or as strong as iron. This name is for the Barony's martial arts award.

However, no examples were provided of period order names which were named after a heraldic charge which was modified by an adjective other than a color term. Lacking such examples, the interpretation of Iron Wolf as "wolf as hard or as strong as iron" is not justifiable. If we interpret iron in the submitted order name as a color term, then the following precedent is relevant:

[Iron Griffin Legion.] This does not follow a pattern found in period Order names. While there Project Ordenamen article presents the interpretation [color][item] as a pattern for period Order names, there are alternative interpretations. One is [color used in heraldry][heraldic charge]. We believe this better describes the Order names of this pattern.. The colors found in period order names, yellow, blue, green, white, and gold are all heraldic tinctures. The color/metal silver, which is SCA-compatible, also follows this pattern. Although iron is found as a color in the gray area, it is not found as a heraldic tincture. [Northshield, Principality of, LoAR 01/2005, Northshield-R]

This precedent was affirmed in July 2006:

Ponte Alto, Barony of. Award name Onore del Ponte di Ferro. This name does not follow patterns of period order names. While it follows the general meta-pattern of heraldic charge, it does not follow the more specific pattern [color] + [heraldic charge]. Ferro (iron) is not a heraldic tincture; it is a material. No documentation was submitted to suggest that ferroor iron was used as an ordinary color name in either Italian or English, nor were any examples of Order names of the form [material] + [heraldic charge]. Barring such documentation, ferro or iron is not registerable as part of an order name. [Atlantia-$]

No new evidence has been provided for iron as the ordinary color name of a heraldic tincture, and hence it is still not registerable in a order name following the pattern "color" + "heraldic charge".

Summits, Principality of the. Order name Order of the Berberie.

This order name is returned for conflict with the Barbary Coast, the name used by Europeans from the 16th to the 19th C to refer to the middle and western coastal regions of North Africa. The designators Order of the and Coast are transparent for purposes of conflict, and the visual and aural difference between Berberie and Barbary is not significant enough for the two to be clear.

LIONS BLOOD ACTIONS

These items will be forwarded to Laurel, and are tentatively scheduled to be decided on in September of 2009.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Household Name, New. Accademia dei Studiosi.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Order Name, New. Ordre la main de Sainte Nicholas.

An Tir, Kingdom of. Badge, New. Checky Or and argent, a hand sable charged with three bezants, one and two.

Forwarded to Laurel with a suggested note to the artist that a checky field consists of squares of equal size. On the submitted emblazon the corners are square but the middle divisions are more rectangular.

Brian Spathi. Name & Device, New. Gules, on a pale ermine a seadragon vert.

Criostal Sealgaire. Name, Name.

Elizabeth Turner de Carlisle. Badge, Resubmission to Laurel. (Fieldless) Two chevronels couped braced argent.

George Slade. Device, Resubmission to Laurel. Argent, a centaur salient helmeted and maintaining an axe bendwise sinister gules, a chief triangular azure and a demi-roundel issuant from base sable.

Gerald de Huntington. Name & Device, New. Per bend sinister gules and azure a sun or and a decrescent argent.

Grece of Huntingdonshire. Device, Resubmission to Kingdom. Per pale sable and argent, a wolf's head erased affronty and on a chief enarched three card piques, all counterchanged.

Maude Bonde. Name & Device, New. Gyronny sable and argent a heart gules winged Or within a border counterchanged.

Millicent Isabella de la Bere. Name, New. (See RETURNS for device.)

Although the submitter did not supply any documentation to support the use of two given names, and there was no commentary forthcoming to support, Lions Blood decided it was not fair for the submitter to be penalized for Lions Blood's lack of knowledge in that regard.

Myvanwy Loyt. Name, Request for Reconsideration. Myfanwy Loyt.

Rhiannon Vreith wreic Gryffyd. Device, Resubmission to Kingdom. Argent, a sheaf of arrows sable and a chief enarched sable platy.

Rose Campbell. Device Change, New. Or, 3 winged boars gules ermined or within a border azure ermined Or.

Siobhan a Burc. Name, New.

Somerled of Ballindore. Name, New.

Suvia filia Heriberti. Name, New.

Name forwarded to Laurel as Suvia filia Heriberti (using the genitive form of <Heribertus>).

Tryggr Tyrson. Name, New. (See RETURNS for device.)

There was conflicting information on the documentation for the name "Tyr". Commentary stated there was no evidence that Tyr (son of the god Oden), has been used by humans in period. It was brought forward during the Lions Blood meeting that in the Norse culture children were often named after gods. We're hoping someone at the Laurel level will have more knowledge on this culture and a more definitive ruling.

Vadas Ersebet. Name & Device, New. Sable, a horse passant and in chief two arrows inverted in saltire Or.

There are concerns about the size of the head and fletching on the arrow, though many shown the depiction on the forms (off line) recognized it instantly as an arrow. It's our hopes that Laurel will agree this can be corrected with a note to the artist.

William Godfrey of Hamilton. Name & Device, New. Azure, an arrow inverted between in chief two lightning bolts in chevron, a chief embattled Or.

These items are being returned for further work

An Tir, Kingdom of. Badge, New. Per fess engrailed argent and azure, a compass star and an open book counterchanged.

This device is being returned for further work. General consensus is that this is a mullet of eight points and as the group specifically wants a compass star, it needs to be redrawn.

Appledore, Shire of. Badge, Resubmission to Kingdom. (Fieldless) Checky argent and sable, an apple slipped gules, all inside an gules annulet.

This device is being returned. This fieldless armory appears to be a independent display of a different piece of armory. The following precedent applies; [(Fieldless) A heart per pale azure and gules.] The fact that this fieldless armory appears to be a independent display of a different piece of armory (because the heart is a shield shape), is in itself a reason for return. This has ruling has been upheld as recently as February 2004: "Per the LoAR of April 2002 (which upheld a significant number of prior precedents), "Note ... our long-standing policy about such 'shield shape' charges used in fieldless badges if the tincture is not plain (thus, divided or with a field treatment), or if the charge is itself charged. Such armory will continue to be returned for the appearance of an independent form of armorial display." [Geoffrey Scott, 02/04, R-West]". [Keran Roslin, 11/05, R-∆thelmearc]" Also this badge uses a plain line charged roundel on a fieldless badge, a practice that has been disallowed since Baldwin of Erebor's tenure as Laurel. [Aneala, Barony of, 07/99, R-Lochac]

There was much debate on whether the Shire might in fact desire Checky argent and sable, an apple slipped within a border gules, to be displayed on a round shape but as the submission forms require a square emblazon, decided to submit the design as fieldless. It should be noted that the square shape is a filing convention and does not reflect any requirement of shape of display.

Hua Meilan. Device, Resubmission to Kingdom. Ermine, fess wavy azure, 3 ducks close beaked gules Or.

This device is being returned for conflict with Robert MacFlandry of Dundee: Ermine, on a fess wavy azure a dolphin naiant argent. There is only one clear difference for the cumulative changes to the group of charges on charges by Rule for Submission X.4.j.

Millicent Isabella de la Bere. Device, New. Per pale vert and azure a tower counterchanged, the portal Or between two arrows inverted points bendwise to center and an mullet of five points in chief Or.

This badge is being returned for violation of Rule for Submission VIII.2.b.i. The field must have good contrast with every charge placed directly on it and with charges placed overall.

Ragnarr ulfheðinn. Device Change, New. Azure, six elder furthark elhaz runes in annulo, bases conjoined, argent.

This device is being returned for violation of Rule for submission VII.7.a. Identification Requirement - Elements must be recognizable solely from their appearance.

Any charge, line of partition, or field treatment used in Society armory must be identifiable, in and of itself, without labels or excessive explanation. Elements not used in period armory may be defined and accepted for Society use if they are readily distinguishable from elements that are already in use. The compass star, defined in the Society as a mullet of four greater and four lesser points, is immediately identifiable without confusion with other mullets or estoiles once its definition is known.

The design overall appears to be a variation of a snowflake and not six Norse runes. Snowflakes have been disallowed since the cover letter of the August 1994 LoAR. [Dietrich Schneewolf, 04/00, R-Artemisia]; "There was very little commentary on the issue of snowflakes, and only a small portion of that was in favor of retaining snowflakes as charges acceptable for registration in armory in the SCA. As a consequence, we will cease registering snowflakes in the future. (As always, people who already have registered snowflakes may apply the grandfather clause to future submissions.) If someone desires a snowflake, please try to steer them to an escarbuncle." (CL 8/94)

Ragnarr ulfheðinn. Badge, New. (Fieldless) An elder huthark Elhaz rune, argent.

This device is being returned for violation of the prohibition against armory consisting of only abstract symbols: Yamahara Yorimasa. Device. Gules, in pale a kanji Yama and a kanji Hara argent. This is returned for redesign. There has long been precedent against armory consisting of a single abstract charge -- symbols that represent a phoneme or meaning, such as letters, numbers, runes, and kanji -- as well as against the registration of monograms. The rationale has been to prevent one submitter from having exclusive right to a symbol which should be commonly available to all. That rationale would, we feel, also apply to phrases made up from multiple abstract charges, if those are the sole elements of the armory. Thus, as we should not accept Argent, the letter L sable or Argent, in fess the letters LO sable, we should not accept Argent, the word LOVE sable. The same argument applies here: we cannot accept a design consisting solely of kanji. We therefore extend the ban on single abstract charges to cover any armory consisting solely of abstract charges, in any language (e.g., Japanese kanji, Norse runes, Arabic script, etc.). This applies whether the armory consists of a single word or a phrase. [March 2006 LoAR].

Tryggr Tyrson. Device, New. Checky per bend gules argent and per bend sinister argent and sable.

This device is being returned for violation of Rule for Submission VII.7.b. Reconstruction Requirement - Elements must be reconstrucible in a recognizable form from a competent blazon. All commenters believe this design as being unblazonable as not only did the proposed blazon not match the emblazon, but neither did any others we tried to come up with.

The following submissions received for the April Internal Letter are being returned for administrative reasons.

• Odile Davignon. Badge, New.

This badge is being returned due to insufficient funds.

Galienna of Ravens Key. Badge, New.

This badge is being returned due to there being no previous registration or name form for `Galienna of Ravens Key' accompanying the submission.

NEW SUBMISSIONS

1: Adeliza a Donyng - Resub Device

Or, an oak tree truncated vert within a double tressure purpure

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra.

The submitter's name was forwarded to Laurel in March of 2009.

The submitter's previous device submission of Or, chaussé purpure, an oak tree couped vert. was returned by Kingdom in March of 2009 for conflict or potential conflict with the following: O'Connor Don - December of 1994 (via Laurel): Argent, a tree eradicated vert; Madrone, Barony of - August of 1979: (Fieldless) A madrone tree eradicated proper; Isadora of Orange Wode - February of 1986 (via Calontir): Ermine, chaussé-ployé sable, an orange tree eradicated proper; Jamie of the Oakenshield - August of 1993 (via the West): Argent, an oak tree eradicated proper, its trunk grasped by a sinister gauntlet fesswise aversant sable; Geoffrey de la Beche - February of 2007 (via Atlantia): Per pale azure and gules, on a pile Or a beech tree proper and Thorkell Óláfsson (via Trimaris): Purpure, on a pile Or a Danish axe gules.

2: Adiantum, Barony of - New Badge

(Fieldless) A double-headed bear's head erased Or.

The submitter's name was registered in April of 1976.

Included with this submission is a petition signed by the Baron and Baroness (Brutus Solamon and Katerine Martel), the Seneschal (Maura Cethin), the Herald (Angharad Bach), the Target Archery Marshal (Saethryth Seolferlocc), the Work Party Coordinator (Maeve Cunningham), the Chamberlain (Drake McGuffin), the Waterbearer (Iurii Levchenich), the Scribe (Elizabeth Turner de Carlisle), the A&S Minister/Librarian (Alysaundre Weldon d'Ath), the Reeve (Tadgh O'Murchadha the Wanderer), the Reevess (Morrghan O'Siodhachenn), the head of the Thingmakers Guild (Marian Staarvèld) and six members of the populace. The petition is dated April 28, 2008.

3: Ælfthryth il - New Name Change

Old Item: Gwenlian Catharne, to be retained.

• Submitter desires a female name.

The submitter's branch is An Tir.

The submitter desires her currently registered primary name of Gwenlian Catharne, registered in July of 2002, retained as an alternate name.

The submitter will accept any changes and desires a feminine name. She expresses no preference should her name have to be changed, nor does she express interest in having her name changed to be authentic. She will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

<Ælfthryth> is cited multiple times in Searle's OAS as a female name.

<il> is a descriptive byname meaning porcupine according to A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the use of students, Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by John R. Clark Hall, M.A., Ph.D. (New York: The MacMillan Company, 1916). The entry reads as follows: {i-}l (igil) m. hedgehog, porcupine, Shr, WW; CP. [`il']

The construction of this name follows the model set forth in Report #3250 from the Academy of Saint Gabriel, the pertinent portion of which is "For that single byname, we can recommend your choice of one which refers to swallows. While we did not find any examples of the Old English word <swealwe> `swallow' used as a byname, we did find examples of bird and animal words used as bynames in Old English, including <Godric finc> `Godric finch' recorded in a charter dating sometime between 1046 and 1053 [9] and <Godwig se bucca> `Godwig the he-goat'. [10] Additionally, both <sealwe> and <spearwa> `sparrow' gave rise to bynames in Middle English. [11] The word <swealwe> is a feminine word, so if the article `the' was used it would be <seo>. We believe that either <swealwe> or <seo swealwe> is a plausible byname for an Old English woman."

The sources used in the above paragraph are as follows:

[9] Miller, Sean, "Anglo-Saxon Charters" (WWW: Anglo-Saxons.net, no date), S 1406 http://www.anglo-saxons.net/hwaet/?do=show&page=Charters

[10] Clark, Cecily, "Onomastics" in Hogg, Richard M., ed., The Cambridge History of the English Language, Volume I: The Beginnings to 1066 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992), p. 470

[11] Reaney, P. H., & R. M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames (London: Routledge, 1991; Oxford University Press, 1995), s.nn. Sparrow, Swallow.

Photocopies of the necessary sources are included with this submission.

4: Alexandros Khristodoulopoulos - New Device

Quarterly, argent and Purpure, a Russian Orthodox cross and flame argent.

The submitter's branch is Rivers Bend.

The submitter's name was registered in July of 2005.

5: Avacal, Principality of - New Badge

(Fieldless) On an open book quarterly argent and or, an Arabian lamp reversed sable enflamed gules and a griffin's head erased gules.

This submission is to be associated with Their Highnesses' University of Avacal

The submitter's name was registered in September of 1993.

This badge is to be associated with Their Highnesses' University of Avacal.

This submission is accompanied by a petition signed by the Prince and Princes of Avacal (Hjalti the Wonderviking and Eirika), Baron and Baroness of Montengarde (Beothuk and Wilma the Still), the Baron and Baroness of Myrgan Wood (Grimolfr and Dezzrianne Dragnova), the Principality Seneschal (Manyra Thorinsdottir), the Principality Herald (Jean de Chauliac), the Principality Chronicler (Ogedei), the Principality Scribe (Findabhair na Noinini), the Principality Chirurgeon (Gosfrei Kempe), the Principality Chatelaine (Eira Halladottir), the Principality A&S Minister (Gabrielle of the leaf), the Principality Calendar officer (Ceara O'Ceallaigh), the Seneschal of Borealis (Aislinn of Dromore), the University Regent (Katelijne van der Ast), and 9 members of the populace. The petition is dated Novermber 1, 2008.

6: Caitilín Ffynne - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Client requests authenticity for 14th-15th century Gaelic.
• Sound (unspecified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra.

The submitter's previous device submission (listed under the name Kaitlin of Medelstede) was returned administratively by Kingdom in April of 2009 for lack of a name with which to go forward.

The submitter will accept any changes, desires a feminine name, cares most about the sound of her name (unspecified) and wishes her name changed to be authentic for 14th-15th century Gaelic. She will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

<Caitilín> is found in the Academy of Saint Gabriel article "Index of Names in Irish Annals" by Mari neyn Bryan at http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/ under the header <Caitilín> (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Caitilin.shtml) with a frequency of 10 dated to 1411, 1471, 1486, 1490, 1506, 1527, 1530, 1568, 1582 and 1592.

<Ffynne> is found in "Names and Naming Practices in the Red Book of Ormond (Ireland 14th Century)" by Heather Rose Jones at http://heatherrosejones.com/names/goedelic/fitzwilliamormond/ormondbynames.html in the list of descriptive bynames under the modern form <Fionn>. The rest of the entry is as follows: "ffynne 1; "white", DIL "find"." It has a frequency of 1.

The submitter says the following about the construction of the name: "Gaelic descriptive bynames for women suffer a practice called lenition. This basically means that they are altered to incorporate how we would use English "the". So, English "Caitilín the White" would becomes "Caitilín Ffynne" in 14th century documents. You can read more on lenition here: http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#descriptivebyname"

Photocopies of all articles are included with this submission.

6: Caitilín Ffynne - Resub Device

Per bend argent and gules, on a bend sable between a rose gules barbed and seeded proper and a swan naiant argent, an arrow inverted argent.

7: Cara de Lorraine - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No major changes.
• Sound (unspecified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Lionsgate.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a feminine name and cares most about the sound of her name (unspecified). She expresses no interest in having her name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427 by Arval Benicoeur (Josh Mittleman) (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto/)

"ACADEMY OF SAINT GABRIEL REPORT 2904

"(http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2904.txt)

""[5] Jacobsson, Harry, E/tudes d'Anthroponymie Lorraine les Bans de Tre/fonds de Metz (1267-1298) (Go:teborg: Gumperts Fo:rlag, 1955). p.206f has <Elisabeth> 1311 from Lorraine and a significant scattering of <Elisabeth> and close variants from the 12th and 13th centuries."

"16th Century Norman Names

"http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/cateline/norman16.html#surnames"

<Cara> is found in this spelling with a frequency of 2 in Arval Benicoeur's "Feminine Given Names from the Online Catasto of Florence of 1427" (URL listed above).

<Lorraine> is found in the Report #2904 only in the bibliography, not in the body of the report itself, as quoted above.

<de Lorraine> is found in the list of surnames in Cateline Mor's article "Sixteenth Century Norman Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/cateline/norman16.html)

No photocopies of the Saint Gabriel articles were included with this submission.

7: Cara de Lorraine - New Device

Per chevron gules and sable, a unicorn sinister, salient, or; chief embattled, or.

8: Doireann Dechti - New Name Change

Old Item: Muirgheal inghean Labhrain, to be released.

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Client requests authenticity for 14th century Scottish Gaelic.
• Sound most important.
• Language most important.

The submitter's branch is Cragmere.

The submitter's current primary name of Muirgheal inghean Labhrain was registered in November of 2000.

The submitter wishes her old name released upon registration of her new name.

The submitter will accept any changes, desires a feminine name and cares most about the sound and language/culture of her name. She wishes her name to be changed to be authentic for 14th century Scottish Gaelic. She includes the note "I am aware that Doireann is Irish". She will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Doireann is a late (after 1200) spelling of an Irish given name, Doirend. Though only pre-1100 Irish Gaelic names might be considered to have also been used in Highland Scotland, so I will accept the change in spelling if it is necessary. I have included a St. Gabriel's letter regarding both of these spellings of the name.

"My desired byname is a descriptive byname meaning "true." I found no information on what descriptive byname a Scottish Gaelic women [sic] might have used, just that they did use them. That statement is included in my documentation. Because of a lack of information, I turned to the lists of Irish Gaelic descriptive bynames.

"I found only a short list of descriptive bynames used by Irish Gaelic women, and a longer list used by Irish Gaelic men. As all but one of the women's bynames were included in the list used by men, I conclude (hopefully) that other names on the men's lists are also suitable for use by women. I feel that a name meaning "true" is suitable for use by a woman, as the women's name list included another name descriptive of character (an Einigh = "the Hospitable") in a positive sense.

"I hope that I am not reaching too far for this desired name, and that this is a suitable trail for documentation."

The Academy of Saint Gabriel Report referred to above is Report #1393 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/1393) and says "<Doireann> is a late-medieval spelling (post-1200) of a name that was earlier spelled <Doirend>."

The use of an Irish given name in Scotland is supported by the Academy of Saint Gabriel article "Medieval Naming Guides: Scottish" at http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/scottish.shtml with the following in the final section, Gaelic Names: "We have little data on the names used by Scottish Gaels before the 12th century, but we believe that in this early period given names common in Gaelic Ireland were likely to have been used in Gaelic Scotland as well."

The style of the name is supported by Sharon L. Krossa's "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" at http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/ with the following under the section Period: "This style of Gaelic name & descriptive adjective byname is appropriate in both Gaelic Scotland and Ireland throughout the Middle Ages and Early Modern period."

The byname <an Einigh> ("the Hospitable") is found in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Descriptive Bynames found in Feminine Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/DescriptiveBynames.html) in the names <mac Margrege in Enig ingine h. Cerbaill> and <Mairgreicce an Einigh Uí Chearbhaill>.

The byname is supported by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Masculine Descriptive Bynames" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Topic.shtml) in the list of Personality/Behavior bynames: "Pure/Genuine (Dechti)".

Photocopies of all articles are included with this submission.

9: Doireann Dechti - New Badge Change

(Fieldless) A bear rampant within and conjoined to an annulet sable.

Old Item: Argent, a bear's jambe erased, in chief three blackberries sable hulled vert, to be released.

The submitter's branch is Cragmere.

The submitter's name may be found above on this letter. Her current primary name of Muirgheal inghean Labhrain was registered in November of 2000.

The submitter desires her old badge of Argent, a bear's jambe erased, in chief three blackberries sable hulled vert released.

10: Gabriella Margaurite Simonetti di Ruccelai - New Badge

(Fieldless) A horse's head erased argent collared gules.

The submitter's branch is Madrone.

The submitter's name was registered in June of 1992 as Gabriella Marguerite Simonetti Ruccellai.

11: Madyn Vach - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No changes.

The submitter's branch is Tir Bannog.

The submitter will not accept any changes and desires a masculine name. He expresses no interest in having his name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

Both <Madyn> and <Vach> are found in Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "A Simple Guide to Constructing 13th Century Welsh Names" at http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/welsh13.html. <Madyn> is listed as the header form under Men's Names with a frequency of at least 5. <Vach> is a mutated form of <Bach>, meaning `small'. <Vach> is marked with an asterisk; the article says the following about names marked with an asterisk: "Women will always use the mutated form of a nickname, and where I have no examples of this, I have supplied what it would be (marked with an asterisk)." The construction of the name is supported by the examples under the list of Bynames Based On A Personal Nickname: <Adaf Goch>, <Ithel Bach>, <Wentliana Vachan> and <Angharad Duy>.

Photocopies of the article were included with this submission.

11: Madyn Vach - New Device

Per pale vert and argent, a boar's head caboshed counterchanged, in base two arrows in saltire counterchanged or and gules.

12: Nicolas Hardel le Noreys - Resub Device

azure, an orle argent and a lion dormant argent

The submitter's branch is Ravensley.

The submitter's name may be found on the April 2009 Internal Letter.

The submitter's previous device submission (for House Hardel) was returned administratively by Kingdom in April of 2009 for use of outdated forms.

13: Odile Davignon - Resub Device Change

Argent, a swan naiant wings elevated and addorsed and on a chief sable three mullets of four points argent.

Old Item: Azure, in pale a lotus blossom in profile and three chevronels braced argent, to be retained.

The submitter's branch is Madrone.

The submitter's name was registered in July of 2004.

The submitter's previous device submission of Argent, a swan naiant wings elevated and addorsed, a bordure sable was returned by Laurel in October of 2008 for conflict with the Principality of Cynagua: Quarterly argent and Or, a swan naiant wings elevated and addorsed within a bordure sable.

The submitter wishes her old device of Azure, in pale a lotus blossom in profile and three chevronels braced argent retained as a badge.

14: Piers the Deaf - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• Client requests authenticity for 1325-1345 English.
• Sound (unspecified) most important.

The submitter's branch is Aquaterra.

The submitter's previous device submission was returned administratively by Kingdom in April of 2009 due to a lack of a name submission to accompany it.

The submitter will accept any changes, desires a masculine name, cares most about the sound of his name (unspecified) and wishes his name to be changed to be authentic for 1325-1345 English. He will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the forms:

"I can't find a no-photocopy source for Piers. However, The National Archives (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/details-result.asp?Edoc_Id=7707099&queryType) dates this given name in a petition to 1332.

"The Middle English Dictionary, header def (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=id&id=MED10774) has the spelling `deaf' dated to 1230 as a noun referring to deaf persons.

"1.) The word `deaf' was used in period to describe people who couldn't hear

"2.) The spelling `deaf' dates to 1230

"3.) The bynames `Def' and "Defling' can be found in the 13th century.

"These three things make a byname `the Deaf' a possibility."

The submitter includes photocopies of the National Archives entry, which reads as follows:

"Description Petitioners: Piers Deyvill.

"Name(s): Deyvill, Piers

"Addressees: King and council.

"Nature of request: Piers Deyvill states that after the order of Knights Templars were dissolved, all its possessions within the king's allegiance were to revert to the lords of the fees of which they were held, and that when they were dissolved, the Templars held certain tenements in South Cave in fee, of the lordship of Piers' ancestors. However the king seized these tenements, but when he removed his hand Piers entered as other lords enter into their fees, and continued his seisin until Lord Mowbray ejected him by force. These tenements are now in the king's hand through the forfeiture of Lord Mowbray: Piers therefore requests that he might be reseised of them.

"Nature of endorsement: [None].

"Places mentioned: South Cave, [East Riding of Yorkshire].

"People mentioned: Order of Knights Templars; [John] Lord Mowbray.

"Date derivation: One of a collection of petitions published on pages 387ff of Rot. Parl., vol I., which all seem to date from around 1322. This dating is confirmed by PROME, Appendix of Unedited Petitions, 1307-1337, Rotuli Parliamentorum I, pp. 387-415, which dates these petitions to 15 or 16 Edward II (1321-1323). A note on the petition dates it to `c. 1321-2', and mentions that the petition is a duplicate of SC 8/6/261, without an endorsement.

"Date 1322…"

14: Piers the Deaf - Resub Device

Per bend gules and argent, a bend sable between a garb proper and a hop cone vert

15: Rose Campbell - New Badge

(Fieldless) On a Boot Gules a Capital Letter "R" Or

The submitter's branch is Frozen Mountain.

The submitter's name was registered in October of 2006.

16: Selewine Offeiriad Gwytherin - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.

The submitter's branch is Montengarde.

The submitter will accept any changes and desires a masculine name. He expresses no preference should his name have to be changed and no desire to have his name changed to be authentic. He will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"I have attached the report I received for The Academy of St Gabriel as well as quotes from the website of Heather Rose Jones in regards to naming conventions for Welsh names and excerpts from emailed communication with her while researching the use of a locative byname. The name I wish to use would be uncommon but not impossible and I believe it meets the naming standards for the College of Heralds as I understand them. The name Selewine is consistent with names of the period and can be supported as porting over to a Welsh persona. Selewine is a priest and received his training at Gwytherin in Denbigshire, the Abbey founded by his patron saint, St. Gwenfrewy. The locative byname is only found in conjunction with title or occupation and while clerical titles were most commonly written in Latin a Welsh equivalent is available and would be preferred."

The Academy of Saint Gabriel report #3175 (http://s-gabriel.org/3175) includes the following:

"You asked for help creating an authentic name for a 10th or early 11th century Welsh man, with a form of <Selewine> as your given name and a byname reflecting the fact that you are a priest and incorporating a reference to either the place Gwytherin or St. Gwenfrewy of Holywell.

"Here is what we found.

"As we said in our original correspondence, <Selewine> is a rare Old English masculine name; we find it recorded once in 1066 in the Latinized form <Seleuuinus> and in 1203 as <filius Selewin'> (where the <'> most likely represents an elided <'i'>; <Selewini> is the possessive form of <Selewinus>, and <filius> requires the following name to be in its possessive form). [1] While we have no evidence that this name was used in Wales, we have found other examples of Old English names being used by Welsh people in the Old Welsh period [2], and so we can recommend <Selewine> as a not impossible name for a Welsh man of your period. We have to stress, though, that if you are interested in a truly authentic name, you'll want to chose [sic] a given name which was known to be used by Welsh men during your period.

"You are right that a locative byname is not the best choice; during your period, we have found no examples of locative bynames which stand apart from a title or an occupation. However, among churchmen we find a wide variety of occupations and titular bynames, including the following Latin terms: [2]

"episcopus (bishop)

"magister (master, teacher)

"doctor (probably a teacher of some sort)

"presbiter (a religious functionary)

"scriptor (writer, scribe)

"lector (reader, lecturer)

"sacerdos (priest)

"abbas (abbot)

"archidiaconus (archdeacon)

"These titles were sometimes found in association with place names, e.g. <abbas Nant Carban>, <sacerdos Ilduit>, <lector Catoci>. [2] In the first example, <Nant Carban> is the name of a church. In the second two examples, the Latinized given name of the dedicatory saint stands in for the church. This gives us two patterns from which we could construct a byname with the references you desire.

"Saint Gwenfrewy's name was recorded as <Wenefreda> in Latin [3,5], so <sacerdos Wenefrede> `priest of Wenefreda' is a suitable byname following the pattern of the second two examples. (The change from <Wenfreda> to <Wenefrede> is again a change to the possessive form of the name.) In a "lives of the saints" from the early 12th century, <Gwytherin> is recorded in Latin as <Guytherin> [5], so based on this <sacerdos Guytherin> `priest of Guytherin' is also a plausible byname. [4]"

The references in the letter are as follows:

[1] Reaney, P.H., & R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames (London: Routeledge, 1991; Oxford University Press, 1995), s.n. Sauvain

[2] Jones, Heather Rose (aka Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn), "The First Thousand Years of British Names", (WWW: Academy of Saint Gabriel, 1998). http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangywstyl/british1000/

[3] Withycombe, E.G., The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd ed. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988), s.n. Winifred.

[4] We'd like to note that while we believe these are authentic bynames, they may not be registerable with the SCA College of Arms, because "priest of St. Gwenfrewy" or "priest of Gwytherin" may be interpreted as a presumptuous claim.

[5] Wade-Evans, A.W., Vitae Sanctorum Britanniae (Cardiff: University of Wales Press Board, 1944). The actual form in the manuscript is <Gurtherin>, but this appears to be an error.

Appended at the end of the Academy of Saint Gabriel report, the submitter has the following quotes:

From Tangwystyl's "The First Thousand Years of British Names" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/british1000/part2.html#oldwelsh): "The greatest variety of occupational or titular bynames are found among the churchmen. There we find episcopus (bishop), magister (master, teacher), doctor (probably a teacher of some sort), presbiter (a religious functionary), scriptor (writer, scribe), lector (reader, lecturer), sacerdos (priest), abbas (abbot), archidiaconus (archdeacon). On the secular side we find rex (king), princeps (prince - although this may instead by a religious title of some sort), and faber (smith). Sometimes these might have a location added: rex Gleuissicg, abbas Nant Carban sacerdos Ilduti, lector Catoci. In the last two cases, the given name of the dedicatory saint stands for the church. Where in one case we find abbas Lannildut, elsewhere we find abba[s] Ilduti."

From email correspondence with Heather Rose Jones: "Keep in mind that offeiriad (in whatever form) means specifically an ordained priest, not simply any person in religious orders. (The word comes originally from a root meaning "the person who makes the offering at mass".) If your intention is for your persona to be a monk, but not specifically a priest, then this isn't the word you want. The word for "monk" that shows up in personal names is "mynach", as seen in the names:"

Photocopies of the Saint Gabriel article cited and the full correspondence with Tangwystyl were not included with this submission.

16: Selewine Offeiriad Gwytherin - New Device

Per Bend Sinister Or and Purpure, a Patriarchal Cross Counterchanged

17: Serena Duran de Paz - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No changes.

The submitter's branch is Tir Bannog.

The submitter will not accept any changes and desires a feminine name. She expresses no interest in having her name changed to be authentic and will allow the creation of a holding name.

The following is quoted from the documentation section of the form:

"Requested Name: Serena Duran de Pas

"Please see cover letter to note acceptable changes to name.

"Device submission form included with name submission."

The cover letter reads as follows:

"Documentation summary for name: Serena Duran de Paz

"Modern name: [redacted]

"Preferred name: Serena Duran de Paz

"If this is not accepted:

"2nd choice: Serena de Paz

"3rd choice: Serena Duran

"Time period: 1485

"Summary of documentation found

"Serena - 2 sites by same author

"Duran - 1 site

"De Paz -1 site

"In surname documentation found several examples of the patronymic and Locative combination pattern similar to Duran de Paz

"Catalina Lopes de Mata

"Maria Gonzales de Solórzano

"Pascuala Espuches de Tuato"

<Serena> is found in Juliana de Luna's "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/isabella/index.html and http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/) in the list of women's names with a frequency of 1.

<Duran> is also found in Juliana de Luna's "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/isabella/index.html) in the list of Patronymic Surnames.

<de Paz> is found in the same article (http://heraldry.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/isabella/index.html), in the list of Locative Surnames.

The same article (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/) also includes <Catalina Lopes de Mata (de Mata)>, <Elvira Lopez de Peñaranda>, <Elvyra Sanches de Peñaranda>, <Maria Garcia del Almenar>, <Maria Gonzales de Solórzano>, <Pascuala Espuches de Tuato>, <Serena Pujades> in the list of Full Names of Women highlighted by the submitter as being representative of her chosen name construction.

[The missing side of the black and white line drawing is not scanner or cropping error, the photocopy of the form is missing the edge of the shield as well. - Lí Ban]

17: Serena Duran de Paz - New Device

Per Chevron throughout Sable and Vert, two ermine spots Or, and a seahorse contourny Or.

18: William Brannan - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Client requests authenticity for Irish Anglicized to Tudor England.
• Culture (Irish descended from English (15th-16th c.)) most important.

The submitter's branch is Glyn Dwfn.

The submitter was knighted in 1982 in Atenveldt as Morgil and is thus entitled to use an orle of chain on his device.

The submitter will not accept major changes, desires a masculine name, cares most about the language/culture of his name (Irish descended from English (15th-16th C)) and wishes his name changed to be authentic for Irish Anglicized to Tudor England. He will allow the creation of a holding name if necessary.

<William> is found in Withycombe (pg 293, 3rd ed.)

<Brannan> is the Anglicized form of <Ó Branáin> cited in Woulfe (Special Revised Edition, 1992, pg 440), supported in Anglicized form in Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's "16th and 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe" (http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/Woulfe/) as the Anglicized root of the Anglicized form <O Brannan>.

The dropping of the <`O'> is supported by the Academy of Saint Gabriel report #3260 (http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/3260.txt): "We have a handful of examples of late-period Anglicized Gaelic feminine names: [7,8]

" <Juane Ny Teige O'Donovane>, daughter of <Teige O'Donovane>

"<Ellen Carthie>, daughter of <Florence Mc Carthie>

"<Juan Ny Morough Donovane>, daughter of <Morough Donovane>

"<Ellen Donovane>, daughter of <Daniell O'Donovane>

"<Joaane Donovane, alias Goggan>

"<Joane ny Teige>

"<Anne Ferrall>

"<Evelin ne Morishe>

"<Marie ny Dowda>

"<Honor nyn Donnell McSwiny>

"<Onore nyn Dermot O'Rian More Voy>

"In four cases we have the father's entire name after <ny> or <nyn>, and in three more we apparently have just the father's given name after <ny> or <ne>. In one case the daughter uses the father's surname without <Mc> and in another without <O>. <Anne Ferrall> could well be of one of these types."

The references referred to in this quote are as follows:

[7] Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters from the Earliest period to the Year 1616 edited from MSS. in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College, Dublin with a translation by John O'Donovan, VII Volumes (Hodges, Smith, and Co: Dublin, 1854), vol. 6, p. 2446.

[8] Ewen, C. L'Estrange, A History of Surnames of the British Isles (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, 1931; Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1968), p. 210.

18: William Brannan - New Device

Per saltire sable and gules, a horse rampant within an orle of chain argent.

An Tir OSCAR counts: 7 New Names, 2 New Name Changes, 6 New Devices, 4 New Badges, 1 New Badge Change. This gives 20 new items. Resub counts: 4 Resub Devices, 1 Resub Device Change. This is a total of 5 resubmissions on this letter, for a total of 25 actions.

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