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An Tir IL dated 2007-07-01 (Jump to Submissions)

Unto Christopher Black Lion and the esteemed members of the An Tir College of Heralds to whom this missive comes, Li Ban ingen Echtigeirn, Boar Herald, sends greetings and felicitations.

The following items are presented for your consideration.

Unless otherwise noted, all submitters will accept the creation of a holding name, if appropriate; has no desire for authenticity and allows any changes.

Commentary on this letter is due on August 10th, 2007.

1: Aine Paixdecoeur - New Device Change

Or, a humpback whale naiant to sinister base sable between two bendlets wavy all between two roses vert seeded Or.

Old Item: Or, a natural whale naiant to sinister base sable between two bendlets wavy all between two roses vert seeded Or, to be released.

The submitter's name was registered in March of 2004.

Included with this submission are multiple pages from Wings in the Sea: The Humpback Whale by Lois King Winn and Howard E. Winn (The Board of Governors, University of Rhode Island: University Press of New England, 1985) documenting that the humpback whale was known to mariners in Mesopotamian Greece. A Spanish explorer named G. Oviedo wrote of the humpback whale in relation to a 1529 voyage off the coast of Spanish America in which he describes the animals he saw. Olas Magnus, a naturalist, wrote of the humpback in 1555. Théodat Sagard described the feeding habits of humpbacks in 1632. Henry Hudson describes his encounter with a herd of whales in 1610. A collision of a ship with a whale is described by Martin Frobisher in 1578. Another is reported by Samuel de Champlain in 1613.

The bibliography of this book includes the following relevant works:

Acousta, J. The Natural and Moral History of the Indies. Reprinted from trans. Of Edwarnd Grimston (revised by Clements R. Markham), London: Hakluyt Society, 1604.

Hakluyt, R. The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation. London, 1599.

Morrison, S.E. The European Discovery of America. The Southern Voyages A.D. 500-1600. New York: Oxford University Press, 1971.

Oviedo, G. de. Historia General y Natural de las Indias. 4 vols., Madrid: Royal Academy of History, 1851-1855.

Winship, G. P. Sailors' Narratives of Voyages Along the New England Coast 1524-1624. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1905.

The submitter includes a note: "Baleine a bosse was the French name which meant whale with a hump. This term would be okay too."

2: Áine Steele - New Alternate Name

Elizabeth Turner de Carlisle

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Client requests authenticity for 14th-16th century English.
• Sound most important.

<Turner> is a header spelling in Reaney & Wilson, revised edition.

<Elizabeth> is a header spelling from Withycombe, third edition.

<Carlisle> is a header spelling in Reaney & Wilson, revised edition. Karlisle spelling dates to 1310 and C and K were often interchanged.

3: An Tir, Kingdom of - New Armory Transfer

Azure, a compass star voided argent.

The submitter's name was registered in December 1981.

The text of the letter is as follows:

"I, Derrick Olson, known in the SCA as Sven, King An Tir, and Rachael Olson, known in the SCA as Signy, Queen An Tir, with the concurrence of Our Seneschale, Kim Stump, known in the SCA as Nadezdha Volynskaiia, and Our Herald, Lee Damon, known in the SCA as Christopher Thomas, do transfer to the Principality of Tir Rígh the following armory, "Azure, a compass star voided argent." I understand that this transfer cannot be withdrawn once made."

The letter is signed by Sven Gunnarson, Signy Oxendahl, Nadezhda Volynskaiia and Christopher Thomas and dated May 19, 2007.

This badge was originally registered to Astriel of Smael Nest in October 1981 and transferred to the Kingdom of An Tir in May of 1999.

4: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the White Claw

• Meaning most important.

Fits the meta-pattern of heraldic charges.

There are ten items under the "Claw" category in the Ordinary and Armorial. The most recently registered is: Rowena of Avalon (October 2000): Argent, a feather inverted between a claw reversed, and a claw sable. This suggests that a claw is a reasonable heraldic charge for SCA purposes.

The OED (http://www.oed.com, subscription required) s.v. white, a. has forms of the colour word as early as c. 950, and dates the precise spelling "white" to before 1300: "Two aungels..Cled in white clothez."

The OED s.v. claw, n. has forms of the word dated to before 700, and has the precise spelling "claw" dat3ed to c. 1440.

No signatures accompany this submission.

5: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Red Gryphon of Avacal

• Meaning most important.

Fits the meta-pattern for heraldic charges.

"If "Gryphon" spelling is unavailable, we would prefer "Griffin" over other substitutes.

"The OED s.v. <griffin>, 1 says that <gryphon> is found from the 1500s onward, but I don't find an example of that spelling in the quotations.

One could argue that <gryphon> is reasonable from the variants given. Here's the raw data from before 1650."

The various spellings and their dates are as follows: `griffon', c. 1386; `grifphon, griffon, grefoun', c. 1400; `griffouns', c. 1435; `gryffons', 1481; `griphin', 1567; `griffon', 1601; `gryphin', 1620; `gryffoune', ?a1400; `greffons'. 1439; `gryffoun', 1460; `griffens', 1552; `griffin', 1640.

The OED s.v. red, a. and n.

a1000 Riddles xxvii. 15 (Gr.) Se reada telg. C1175 Lamb. Hom. 83 Alse þe sunne scine{edh} þurh þe glesne ehþurl… {Ygh}if þet gles is red ho schine{edh} red.

c1205 LAY. 15940 Þe oder is milcwhit..þee o{edh}er r?d alse blod.

1297 R. GLOUC. (Rolls) 2786 Tueye grete dragons out of þis stones come, Þe on was red, þe oþer wyt.

1377 LANGL. P. `Pl. B. II. 12 Hir fyngres were fretted with golde wyre And there-on red [v.r. rede] rubyes as red as any glede.

"A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry As Used in the Society for Creative Anachronism, 2nd edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio has the following entry for <Griffin>: "A griffin, or gryphon, is a classical monster, with the head, wings and forefeet of an eagle, the hindquarters of a lion, and mammalian ears; period emblazons sometimes show it bearded as well…."

No signatures accompany this submission.

6: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Heart and Gryphon

• Meaning most important.

Fits the meta-pattern for heraldic charges.

`Heart' as spelled dated from 1463.

`Gryphon' as spelled from 1500s onward.

The submitter includes the following note regarding the spelling of <gryphon>: "If not acceptable, we could like "Griffin"."

The OED s.v. <heart>, n. dates the meaning "A figure or representation of the human heart; esp. a conventionalized symmetrical figure formed of two similar curves meeting in a point at one end and a cusp at the other. Also, an object, as a jewel or ornament, in the shape of a heart" to 1463: "The seid broche herte of gold to be hange, naylyd, and festnyd vpon the shryne". We find the modern spelling <heart> used for a stylized figure in 1529 (referring to a playing card).

"The OED s.v. <griffin>, 1 says that <gryphon> is found from the 1500s onward, but I don't find an example of that spelling in the quotations.

One could argue that <gryphon> is reasonable from the variants given. Here's the raw data from before 1650."

The various spellings and their dates are as follows: `griffon', c. 1386; `grifphon, griffon, grefoun', c. 1400; `griffouns', c. 1435; `gryffons', 1481; `griphin', 1567; `griffon', 1601; `gryphin', 1620; `gryffoune', ?a1400; `greffons'. 1439; `gryffoun', 1460; `griffens', 1552; `griffin', 1640.

"A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry As Used in the Society for Creative Anachronism, 2nd edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio has the following entry for <Griffin>: "A griffin, or gryphon, is a classical monster, with the head, wings and forefeet of an eagle, the hindquarters of a lion, and mammalian ears; period emblazons sometimes show it bearded as well…."

No signatures accompany this submission.

7: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Golden Flame

• Meaning most important.

Fits heraldic charges meta-pattern.

OED dates `golden' at 1552. OED s.v. golden, a. has the spelling "golden", meaning "of the colour of gold".

OED dates `flame' at 1563. The OED s.v. flame, n. shows that forms of the word appear in the fourteenth century; one example of the modern spelling is dated to 1563.

"A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry As Used in the Society for Creative Anachronism, 2nd edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio has the following entry for <Flame>:

"A flame is the area of combustion which gives off heat and light in a fire. It is also, more fully, termed "flames of fire"…." (Photocopies included.)

No signatures accompany this submission.

8: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Red Oak

• Meaning most important.

Fits heraldic charges meta-pattern.

The OED dates `Red' being used as early as 700 AD in other forms, exact spelling in 1175.

The OED s.v. red, a. and n.

a1000 Riddles xxvii. 15 (Gr.) Se reada telg. C1175 Lamb. Hom. 83 Alse þe sunne scine{edh} þurh þe glesne ehþurl… {Ygh}if þet gles is red ho schine{edh} red.

c1205 LAY. 15940 Þe oder is milcwhit..þee o{edh}er r?d alse blod.

1297 R. GLOUC. (Rolls) 2786 Tueye grete dragons out of þis stones come, Þe on was red, þe oþer wyt.

1377 LANGL. P. `Pl. B. II. 12 Hir fyngres were fretted with golde wyre And there-on red [v.r. rede] rubyes as red as any glede.

The OED s.v. oak, a. and n. has forms of the word dated to "early Old English". I was told by the herald who checked the OED for me that the spelling "oak" was used from the 15th century forward. The "oak" spelling has been found acceptable to Laurel in the past: The Order of the Oak (Barony of the Steppes Jan 1981).

"A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry As Used in the Society for Creative Anachronism, 2nd edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio has the following for <Oak> under the entry for <Tree>: "…Many types of tree are found in heraldry. The oldest and most common tree is the oak [746], found in the canting arms of Okestead, 1275…"

No signatures accompany this submission.

9: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Valkyrie

The submitter will accept any changes; cares most about the spelling of the name, which is desired to be "as close to modern as possible" and expresses no interest in having the name changed to be authentic.

Fits the meta-pattern for Orders named after non-Christian gods, one step from period practice of the pattern for "Saint's name".

Orders named after non-Christian gods are considered to follow the "saint's name" meta-pattern and are one step from period practice.

The first forms of Valkyrie in English, referring to Scandinavian mythology, are from the eighteenth century. (The OED s.v. Valkyrie does give the Old Norse word: valkyrja, plural valkyrjur.) However, there was a related Old English word.

Under Walkyrie, the OED says: 1. OE. Mythol. The designation of a class of goddesses or female demons supposed to haver in or ride through the air over battle-fields and decide who should be slain: corresponding to the Scandinavian VALKYRIE.

The OE. word (apart from the transferred sense 2) is found only as the rendering of L Bellona, the goddess of war, or of names of the Furies and Gorgons of classical mythology. Possibly the conception may have been less definite in Old English heathendom than in the Scandinavian belief of later times, according to which these `war-maidens' were twelve in number.

Sense (2) is "witch" or "sorceress". Under this sense, there's the spelling "walkyries" from the 1300s. The standardized Old English singular is wælcyrie (the æ stands for an a-e ligature).

No signatures accompany this submission.

10: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Silver Lute

• Meaning most important.

Fits heraldic charges meta-pattern.

The OED s.v. silver, n. a. has forms of the word as early as the ninth century, and this specific spelling in (for example) 1591.

The OED s.v. lute, v.1. has this exact spelling as early as c. 1386.

"A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry As Used in the Society for Creative Anachronism, 2nd edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio has the following entry for <Lute>: "A lute is a stringed musical instrument, popular through out Europe from the 13th Century onward…"

No signatures accompany this submission.

11: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of the Gilded Feather

• Meaning most important.

The submitter says the following about this submission: "The Order of the Gilded Feather is to be our service award for children. We are hoping to make it similar to our Order of the Gilded Griffin as this is our service award for adults. The Gilded Griffin was already passed by Laurel and so we hope that Gilded can be grandfathered to us.

The OED s.v. feather dates the modern spelling to 1581 in the phrase "A Byrd of the same feather".

The Middle English Dictionary (http://ets.umdl.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med-idx?type=byte&byte=66019735&egdisplay=open&egs=66033958&egs=66031000):

g{i-}lden (adj.) Also gulden, guilden (error) 3ulden & gelden. Pl. (early) gildenene.

g{i-}lden (v.) Forms: p. gilt(e & gildede; ppl. i)gilt, gilte, gilti, i)gult, i)gelt, glit & i)gild, gilde, gildie, i)gelt & gilded, igilled.

(a) To overlay (sth.) with gold, cover with gilding, gild; (b) to conceal (sth. bad) under a fair exterior to appearance; (c) to decorate (sth.) with gold; inlay (sth.) with hold, embroider or brocade with gold thread; make (letters) with gold leaf or gold pigment; adorn (sth. With figures) in gold; ~ heles, heels with gold or gilt spurs; (d) fig. to adorn or embellish (sth.); enrich (a language).

(b) Alch. To imbue (wine or alcohol) with the properties of gold by dipping heated gold in it.

Though there was no example given with this exact spelling used as an adjective, it is given in their list of used forms for past tense.

Gilden is grandfathered to Avacal through the Order of the Gilded Griffin. We would accept Gilden Feather as a major change if needed but would prefer to have the two awards match."

"A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry As Used in the Society for Creative Anachronism, 2nd edition" by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholme and Akagawa Yoshio has the following entry for <Feather>:

"A feather is one of the growths covering a bird's wings and body; it consists of a quill or central shaft with a flat leaf-like surface growing from it. It is also termed a "plume", …." (Photocopies included).

No signatures accompany this submission.

12: Avacal, Principality of - New Order Name

Order of Fortitude

• Meaning most important.

"Fits the meta-pattern of Orders named for virtues. OED spelling dated at 1520. This is one of the Cardinal Virtues of the Roman Catholic Church."

The OED entry for fortitude reads: "2. Moral strength of courage. Now only in passive sense: Unyielding courage in the endurance of pain or adversity. (One of the cardinal virtues.)"

Included with this submission is a photocopy of the webpage version of the "Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition" which can be found at http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c1a7.htm. Detailed on this site are the cardinal virtues, of which fortitude is one.

No signatures accompany this submission.

13: Calandra de Silva - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• No major changes.
• Sound most important.

The submitter cares most about sound and spelling.

From the 9/99 Middle LoI (http://www.midrealm.org/heraldry/escutcheon/99/09/9909.html): Calandra Aldobrandi. New Name.

Calandro (a masculine name) is found in Lyth and Mittleman, "Italian Personal Names" (108). Calandra is a hypothetical feminine form and follows a pattern (e.g., Alessandro-Alessandra, Ananstasio-Ananstasia, Antonio-Antonia, etc.). Aldobrandi is dated to 1427 in "Italian Names of Florance [sic]" (1). The client cares most about meaning and sound and would like an authentic 14th century Italian name.

<de Silva> is from "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century" by Juliana de Luna (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/isabella/locative.html).

The submitter includes the following note regarding <de Silva>: "Although an Italian name would be preferred, we could not find an Italian version of this. The mix of Italian and Spanish is an accepted weirdness."

Photocopies of the articles are included.

13: Calandra de Silva - New Device

Sable, a bend between two bees Or.

14: Calandra de Silva - New Badge

Fieldless, a goutte barry of six Or and Sable.

The submitter's name may be found above.

15: Elisabeth de Rossignol - New Blanket Permission to Conflict

The submitter's name was registered in August of 1983.

The text of the letter is as follows:

"I, Lisa Mohr, known in the SCA as Elisabeth de Rossignol, waive the full protection of my registered name "Elisabeth de Rossignol". I grant permission to any future submitter to register a name that is not identical to my registered name. I understand that this permission can be withdrawn by written notice to the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, but that conflicting items registered while it is in force will remain registered."

The letter is signed by Lisa Mohr and dated 12/13/06.

16: Geoffrey Mylar - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No major changes.
• Sound most important.

The Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd Edition, by E.G. Withycombe, has <Geoffrey> as a header spelling and of the name says, "Geoffrey was common in England from the 12th to 15th C., giving rise to many surnames…"

The Surnames of Scotland, by George F. Black, sub Jaffrayy show that the spelling <Geoffrey> was used as a surname in 1474 and that the surname stems from the given name Geoffroi, from the French.

The Surnames of Scotland, by George F. Black, sub Millar, dates the spelling Mylar to 1513.

16: Geoffrey Mylar - New Device

Purpure, a Pale Or and an Otter rampant argent overall.

17: Hugo Bugg - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.

The submitter cares most about the spelling of his name: "I like that it is 4 letters + 4 letters."

Withycombe, E.G.; The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Names, s.n. Hugh. "Introduced to England by the Normans… The Latin form was Hugo." Hugo is cited in 1082, 1086, and 1199-1220.

Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. s.n. Bugg. Citations include Walter Bugge, 1169, and Osbert le Bugge 1327. All cited spellings in Reaney (and also in the Middle English Dictionary s.v. Bugge) include the -e. However, we are providing two additional sources to cite the <Bugg> spelling.

The Yorkshire Subsidy Rolls for 1379, in Rotherham parish, Strafforth wapentake (http://www.genuki.org.uk:8080/big/eng/YKS/Misc/SubsidyRolls/WRY/Rotherham.html, (printed copy attached) lists <Johannes Bugg>. Also, the Records of the Borough of Nottingham (printed copy attached) list Radulfo (Ralph) Bugg several times around the year 1240.

17: Hugo Bugg - New Device

Barry argent and vert, a grenade gules enflamed proper within a bordure sable.

18: Iuliana De La Sara - New Device

Per fess embattled sable and vert, in pale a wolf passant and an acorn slipped and leaved argent.

The submitter's name was submitted on the June 2007 Internal Letter. Her device of the same blazon was returned on the same letter for administrative reasons.

19: Karin Ollesdotter av Augualdsnes - Resub Badge

Fieldless, a seahorse Gules, sustaining a whistling arrow vert.

The submitter's name was registered in January of 2005.

Her previous submission of the same blazon was returned in February of 2007 for lack of documentation of the whistling arrow.

Included with this submission are photocopies of pages from the Museum of Anthropology's database (http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/databases.shtml) documenting the existence and time period of the whistling arrow. The page for the whistling arrow itself can be found at http://database.coas.missouri.edu:16080/fmi/iwp/cgi?-next=. [URL does not function for me; the Chinese Archery Equipment section of the Greyson Archery Collection (http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/grayson/chinaarchery/chinaarchery.shtml) housed on this website has images of whistling arrows, though the images do not match that provided by the submitter nor does the catalogue number match. - Lí Ban]

The description of the whistling arrow provided by the submitter is as follows: "Origin: Central Asia, Mongolia. Period: ca. 13th century. Whistling arrowhead of cast iron. Broadhead with beveled edges. Hollow at base of point with bulbous enlargement and four small holes. Tanged. Someone has recently sharpened the edges of the blade. Total length is 8.6 cm; head length is 3.7 cm; head width is 2.9 cm; diameter of bulb is 1.5 cm. Provenance: Given to CEG by Wayne Alex, who received it from archaeologist G. Menes, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia."

This submission is on the old form.

20: Magy of Aberdeen - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Client requests authenticity for 15th century Scottish.

<Magy> is found on page 681 in Black's article of surnames dated to 1400. Information used can be found at http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/scottishfem/scottishfemlate.html. [Article is "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records, Part Three: Post-1400 Names" by Talan Gwynek. - Lí Ban]

No documentation was provided for <of Aberdeen>.

No photocopies of the Saint Gabriel article were included with this submission.

20: Magy of Aberdeen - New Device

Argent, a ivy leaf vert, a chief vert.

21: Marianella de Ravenna - New Name

• Submitter desires a female name.
• Client requests authenticity for Venice, 1290-1350.
• Language (Italian) most important.
• Culture (Venice, 1290) most important.

The submitter provides excerpts from two books in support of <Marianella>:

The Renaissance Notion of Woman by Ian Maclean (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1980, reprinted 1987) discusses Marianism, and

Medieval Women in their Communities by Diane Watt (University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1997) discusses "…Marien, daughter of William le Caucheteur, written on November 1282…" Neither excerpt mentions <Marianella>.

No documentation was provided for <de Ravenna>.

Photocopies of the excerpts from the books are provided with this submission.

21: Marianella de Ravenna - New Device

White sparrow in flight on a purple background with a yellow flame.

The submitter includes the following note regarding her device: "This is a lampworkers' flame for making glass beads not a cooking flame."

22: Muirgheal inghean Alasdair - New Device Change

Sable, in chief three mullets argent and a lion passant Or.

Old Item: Sable, in bend a compass star argent and a cat sejant Or, to be retained.

The submitter's name was registered in June of 2006.

23: Muirgheal inghean Alasdair - New Badge

(Fieldless) A lion passant Or sustaining a mullet argent.

The submitter's name was registered in June of 2006.

24: Saraid ni Pharlain - New Device

Sable, a besom bendwise argent, in sinister chief a increscent argent

The submitter's name was registered in August of 1991.

25: Tir Rígh, Principality of - New Acceptance of Armory Transfer

Azure, a compass star voided argent.

The letter reads as follows:

"We, Richard Keffeler, known in the SCA as Ulfgar Thorvaldsson, Prince of Tir Rígh, and Anita Connolly, known in the SC as Renee de Josselin, Princess of Tir Rígh, with the concurrence of our Herald, Don Sowell, known in the SCA as Quentin Silver Yale, do accept the transfer to the Principality of Tir Rígh the following armory, "Azure, a compass star voided argent." We understand that this transfer cannot be withdrawn once made."

The letter is signed by Ulfgarr Thorvaldsson, Renee de Josselin and Quentin Martel, Silver Yale Herald and dated May 25, 2007.

26: Tobias le Blunt - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No changes.
• Sound most important.

The submitter presents the following as documentation for his name:

"A Dictionary of English Surnames - Revised Edition (3rd) by Reaney & Wilson

Tobias - page 449 (First Name) S.N. Toby: Tobias prior, c 1142-50, Place Names of Essex

le Blunt - page 50 (Last Name) S.N. Blunt: John le Blunt, c 1194, Stafford Shire Chartulary."

26: Tobias le Blunt - New Device

Per pale argent and sable two piles each charged with a roundel counterchange

27: Tomas deCourcy - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No changes.

<Tomas> is documented from the following:

http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/brasses/men.html [The name of the article is "English Names found in Brass Enscriptions" by Julian Goodwyn - Lí Ban].

http://www.ashmolean.org/ash/departments/antiquities/brass/counties/Sussex.html: Parish: Hastings - St. Clements: Tomas Wekes 1563 Monumental Brass Sussex 3/32 [The name of the article is "Monumental Brass Rubbings for England, Sussex" from the Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeololgy's Department of Antiquities - Lí Ban].

And finally, three registrations from the O&A: Tomas Moreno de la Cruz (Outlands, May 2006), Tomas Egilsson (West, May 2005), and Tomas of Wirth (East, September, 1986).

<de Courcy> is documented from Kinney, Arthur F. "Titled Elizabethans". Archon Books Hamdem, Connecticut 1973: "Gerald deCourcy, 12th lord Courcy of Kinsale or Lord Kinsale, only son and Heir, Died without male posterity in 1599" (page 42).

<de Courcy is also documented from the following:

http://www.genealogyweb.com/norman.html#3: Hastings 1066, Richard de Courci [The above URL does not function. - Lí Ban].

http://www.ccg.org/_domain/abrahams-legacy.org/william-conqueror.html: Richard de Courci [The name of the article is "William the Conquerer and the Battle of Hastings"; it is a timeline site. - Lí Ban].

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Pointe/1034/gedcom/d0006/g0000063.html#15840: John DECOURCY, Earl of Ulster DEATH: 1219 [This is a family tree site. - Lí Ban].

http://www.burnsmoley.com/pages/area/normans.php: "In early February 1177 John de Courcy, a knight from Somerset who had come over with Henry II in 1171" [The above URL does not function. - Lí Ban].

And finally, from three previous registrations in the O&A: Caitlin de Courcy (East, May 1992), Lance de Courcy (Ansteorra, April 1994), and Merewyn de Courcy of Tavistock (An Tir 1984).

Photocopies of the excerpt from the book are included with this submission.

27: Tomas deCourcy - New Device

Azure a eagle rising wings displayed and inverted argent

The image on the device form is computer generated and horribly pixilated.

28: Tristram O'Shee - New Badge

Argent, a sea-dragon erect gules and on a chief wavy sable three fleur d'lis argent

The submitter's name was registered in August of 2006.

29: Valentino da Siena - New Badge

Fieldless, a label Or.

The submitter's name was registered in March 2003.

30: Vanya Betzina - Resub Device

Sable, between two crosses clechy three crosses cletchy palewise upon a bend sinister gules fimbriated Or.

The submitter's name was registered in August of 2005.

The submitter's previous submission of Sable, a bend sinister gules fimbriated Or charged with three crosses barbed voided palewise Argent between two of same was returned in March 2007 for the use of voiding on the secondary and tertiary charges.

This submission addresses the previous problem.

31: Vanya Betzina - Resub Badge

(Fieldless) A cartwheel quarterly purpure and vert charged on the hub of a compass rose Or.

The submitter's name was registered in August of 2005.

His previous submission of the same blazon was returned in March 2007 for the following reasons:

The charge on the hub is not a compass rose. Acompass rose has the four cardinal points marked with long arms and the four intercardinal points (NE, SE, SW, NW) marked with shorter arms. The north point is always set off, usually with the use of a fleur-de-lys as an arrowhead.

In addition, this depiction of the compass rose is difficult to identify on the cartwheel. In large part, this difficulty is caused by all the long arms of the cartwheel hiding the much smaller arms of the compass rose.

This submission addresses the previous concerns.

32: Vanya Betzina - New Badge

Argent, a cross clechy voided within a double tressure sable.

The submitter's name was registered in August of 2005.

33: William De Mowbray - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.
• No changes.
• Client requests authenticity for 10th century English.

<William> is documented from The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, page 293.

<De Mowbray> is documented from The Oxford Dictionary of English Surnames, page 316.

No photocopies of the pages from either source were provided with this submission.

33: William De Mowbray - New Device

Argent, a wyvern erect vert, langed gules, within an orle of ivy leaves vert.

34: Ziyadatallah al-Ifriqi ibn `Abd Allah - New Name

• Submitter desires a male name.

"Andalusian Names: Arabs in Spain" by Juliana de Luna, http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/andalusia.html has Ziyadatallah and Abdu'llah as given names, al-Ifriqi as a descriptive byname. `Abd Allah is an alternate transliteration of Abdu'llah.

An Tir OSCAR counts: 9 New Names, 1 New Alternate Name, 9 New Order Names, 10 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes, 5 New Badges, 1 New Blanket Permission to Conflict, 1 New Acceptance of Armory Transfer, 1 New Armory Transfer. This gives 39 new items. Resub counts: 1 Resub Device, 2 Resub Badges. This is a total of 3 resubmissions on this letter, for a total of 42 actions.

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