Teceangl Bach
lions-blood@antir.sca.org
tierna@agora.rdrop.com
January 16, 2002
Send thy comments here:
Brenda Klein
5235 SE Lambert St #A-5
Portland, OR 97206-9068

Unto the An Tir College of Heralds, greetings from Áedán mac Suibne.

Commentary on this Letter will be due March 21st, 2002.
NOTE: This is THURSDAY, one day earlier than usual. I'm leaving for symposium on Friday.
(Send comments to Lions Blood Herald, information at top of this letter)

The March Lions Blood meeting will be at An Tir Kingdom Heraldic Symposium on Sunday, March 21, at 1pm. Location has not yet been set, but should be announced before the February IL goes out. There will be a Wreath Road Show in the morning, and the Lions Blood meeting will follow it.

The February Lions Blood meeting will be held on Sunday, February 17th, 1pm, at the home of HL Ciaran Cluana Ferta in Portland: 9312 N. Fairhaven Ave., Portland, OR 97203. Phone: 503-247-9338. Bring chairs.

From the North: Take I-5 south to Oregon exit 306-B and follow the signs for Marine Dr. westbound. Once on Marine Dr., stay in the left lane for about 0.9 mi to the train overpass. Immediately following the overpass turn left onto N. Portland Rd., again staying in the left lane when there is one. At the end of the road turn right and immediately right again. Go 1 block, and look for the yellow house on the right with Herald's Trumpets out front.

From the South: Take I-5 north to exit 305-B (Lombard St. West). Once on Lombard, go 2.5 mi. to Ida Av (at the 2nd Fred Meyer store) and turn right. Go to the end of the street and turn left. Just after the stop sign, is another street to the right (Fairhaven Av) where you turn right, and go 1 block. Look for the yellow house on the right with Herald's trumpets out front.

FROM LIONS BLOOD HERALD

Greetings from Teceangl.

Remember, the An Tir Kingdom Heraldic Symposium webpage is at http://www.easystreet.com/~rafaella/ATKHS2002.htm Event Steward: Natasha Orionova Zateeva, orionova@juno.com or orionova@hotmail.com

To PRE-REGISTER: contact Baron David of Moffat, amoffatamoffat@juno.com, or David Hunter of Montlaw, 1703 Crosby Court SW, Tumwater, WA 98512.

You'll remember last month that I mentioned the Internal Letter is in the process of becoming a heralds' newsletter. To that end I'm going to attempt some level of coherency in the stuff I post in this pre-submissions section. Laurel Cover Letters seem a good place to begin. Also, I am soliciting opinions on what Laurel registration and return information for An Tir submissions to include, if any, and how much of it should be included. Please check the Laurel archive of LoARs to see the sort of thing which is printed before commenting. I will do one of three levels of information: none, listing name and blazons only, or full coverage quoting the entire An Tir information from LoARs.

This excerpt is included because I very often simply cut and paste from commentaries onto the Letter of Intent, particularly when conflicts are found. To that end, you can make it easier for me to make it easier for Wreath (the Sovereign who does armory decisions) by knowing what she needs.

From the Cover Letter to the October 2001 LoAR:

From Wreath: Request for Citing Items from the Armorial and Ordinary and Cover Letters

When quoting from the Armorial and Ordinary, please cite the date of the armory as well as the name and blazon. The Wreath files are organized in three different places, based on date: the 1985 and before CD archives, the 1986-1993 CD archives, and the binders. We can save valuable time in the meeting if the registration date is on the citation. My staff and I thank you for your consideration.

Also, when citing cover letters, please cite the LoAR with which the cover letter is associated, as well as the date of the cover letter. It helps find the cover letter in the archives somewhat faster. Thanks again!

The Grandfather Clause

The "Grandfather Clause" is actually two separate sections of the Rules for Submission, II.5. and VII.8. Each says essentially the same thing, with one covering names and the other armory, and they are two of the least-understood sections of the RfS.

II.5. reads:

5. Registered Names. - Once a name has been registered to an individual or group, the College of Arms may permit that particular individual or group to register elements of that name again, even if it is no longer permissible under the rules in effect at the time the later submission is made. This permission may be extended to close relatives of the submitter if the College of Arms deems it appropriate.

Only the actual name element from the originally registered submission is covered by this permission. For example, if an individual had registered a surname from a fantasy novel that has no relation to period naming before such names were restricted, that surname could be retained if that submitter decided to change his given name, even though it might not be acceptable under these rules. He could not register other surnames from the same novel, however. The College of Arms might also agree to register this surname to the original submitters children. This allowance will not be granted for submitters other than the original owner under any other circumstances.

VII.8. reads:

8. Registered Armorial Elements. - Once an armorial element has been registered to an individual or group, the College of Arms may permit that particular individual or group to register that element again, even if it is no longer permissible under the rules in effect at the time the later submission is made. This permission may be extended to close relatives of the submitter if the College of Arms deems it appropriate.

Only the actual armorial element from the originally registered submission may be covered by this permission. For example, if an individual had registered armory containing a fimbriated lion many years ago, only that fimbriated lion would be covered under this rule, not fimbriated wolves, eagles, or lions in other postures. The College of Arms might also agree to register this lion to the original submitters children. This allowance will not be granted for submitters other than the original owner under any other circumstances.

These specify only items already registered, only identical items being submitted at a later time, and specifies that Laurel may extend the privilege to blood children, not spouses and not members of their household. It has nothing to do with culture, anything from the modern world, nor SCA relationships. If someone tells you that something is "grandfathered" to them, check the appropriate Rule before believing it, but also be aware that if a person wants new armory with a currently disallowed motif and they have already registered that motif, they might qualify for the Grandfather Clause.

Even more stuff about documentation:

The revised Administrative Handbook has been approved and will be released soon. This is a wonderful thing, as it clarifies some points and has a much-improved Appendix H, which will prove valuable to many of us who have small libraries and need as may cite-only sources as we can get. It also contains the dreaded "documentation is required for all name elements" sentence.

Don't panic! The An Tir College of Heralds has many fine commenters who can and will supplement whatever you can do to document a name. Lions Blood will accept "I believe this is 14th century French" as enough to put onto the Internal Letter. Even a note that it is in a horrible-for-SCA-purposes source is worth mentioning. So please be certain to include any and all information you have on a name when you help the client with his or her forms. The College will be far more likely to help if they have a jumping-off point to aim their researches. I might return submissions with no documentation at all, but I will not return something I know someone's tried on. Heralds vary in skill and resources and no one should be penalized for a lack of either.

On using webpages:

Webpages linked to www.sca.org/heraldry do not need to be printed in full to be used as documentation, but they do need to have identifying and documentation information printed. Print out the intro (or first two pages if it's long) and make sure the URL is on at least the first page, then print out the page(s) which document the name. Just as though it were copies from a book, you need to submit three copies of everything and to highlight the information needed for Laurel to make decisions with.

Webpages not linked to the SCA Heraldry webpage must be printed in full for documentation purposes, three copies, highlighted. Beware of baby or role-playing name sites. Just like baby name books, they have no interest in historic accuracy and are useless for documentation purposes. Usually, if there are no dates, it's not documentation.

The Medieval Names Archive has a wonderful list of webpages to avoid at http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/badpages.shtml

As always, if in doubt, ask.

I would like to include heraldic titles in the listing of contributors to the Lions Blood meetings. Please include your title in your commentary, or if you object to this please tell me so. Since I have not asked for this information before, please accept my apologies if I should get anything wrong in the following information.


RESULTS OF DECEMBER LIONS BLOOD MEETING-

The following people were present at the December Lions Blood meeting or sent commentary: Teceangl Bach, Lions Blood; Rafaella d'Allemtejo, Black Stag; Francesca Testarossa de' Martini, Dragon's Mist; Emma Randall, Bealidh; Meadhbha inghean Bhrain an Muilleóir; Ercc McFitheal; Marya Kargashina; Ciaran Cluana Ferta; Sebastian Sterne; Katerine of Hindscroft; Rosamund of the Misty Meadows, Aquaterra; Fionnghuala Friseil, book deputy Aquaterra; Frederic Badger; Brighid an Morra, Cold Keep; Ciar inghean ui Fhothaidh, book deputy Madrone; John Kane; Moreach Nicmhaolain; Daimhín Ó Ruaidh, Sable Loat; David of Moffat, Electrum; Kateryn of Falconkeep, Be Wayre; Natasha Orionova Zateeva, Vox Leonis; Li Ban ingen Eachthiarna MacNessa, Northern; and Tadgg h-úa Faelan of Clan MacNessa.

The following names and armory have been sent to Laurel (November LoI)--

Antonella da Sicilia Name and Device, New
Per chevron sable and gules, a dagger inverted argent piercing a crescent Or within a bordure embattled Or.
   When one charge pierces another it means that both charges have equal visual weight and may be considered co-primary (which disqualifies this device for X.2., by the way). This is similar to crossing charges in saltire - they each lie directly on the field and must have good contrast with the field, not one another.

Balthasar Yvon Charon Device, Resubmission to Kingdom
Ermine, a cross formy nowy vert and on a chief sable three crosses of Lorraine argent.
   submitter's name was registered in September 2001.

Cái Mór, Shire of Branch Name and Device, New
Argent, on a fess sable between two laurel wreaths gules three chevronels braced Or.
   The registered name Caer Maer, Barony of, was mentioned by commenters. This is probably clear by RfS V.2.a. having a significantly different descriptive element in a completely different language. The closeness of the two names was mentioned to Laurel, however, in case we're wrong.
   We will instruct them to draw the laurel wreaths more circular.

Findlaech MacGillandrias Name and Device, New
Vert, a saltire checky sable and Or.
   Submitted as Finlaech, the spelling was changed at kingdom to match the documentation. Questions were asked if the sable parts of the saltire were legal. RfS VIII.2. says " All armory must have sufficient contrast to allow each element of the design to be clearly identifiable at a distance." Subsection a. defines contrasting tinctures, and article ii. specifically addresses this sort of thing, stating that good contrast exists between, "An element equally divided of a color and a metal, and any other element as long as identifiability is maintained". This means that so long as the two elements (element = charge or field) do not share a tincture.

Julian Sinclair Name, New

Juliana van Aardenburg Name, New

Lia Anna Stewart Name, New
   Double given names were extremely rare in English until the very end of period, but they are registerable in the SCA.

Lovell of Schadwode Name, New

Meadhbha inghean Bhrain an Muilleóir Name and Device, New
Sable, on a bend sinister between a raven contourny and masks of comedy and tragedy bendwise argent four thistles bendwise purpure slipped and leaved vert.
   The intended meaning of the name is "Maeve, daughter of Brian the Miller". Although occupational bynames are rare to nonexistent in Gaelic, occupational patronymics were used, "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names" states that the father's occupation was sometimes used in simple patronymic names. Meadhbha hopes that this step from period practice is allowable and acknowledges it is unusual. We think we lenited it correctly, but she allows changes so that Laurel will assure it's in the correct form. To understand lenition better Lions Blood highly recommends the article "Lenition in Gaelic Orthography" online at http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotlang/lenition.shtml.

Rónnait ingen Fáeláin Name, New

Roscelin de Limoges Name and Device, New
Gules, a natural panther passant argent spotted sable and on a chief argent three roses gules.
   Confusion ensued between the terms natural and proper. A natural creature is one found in nature, rather than heraldry, and the term is specifically used when an heraldic critter of the same name exists. An heraldic panther is a maneless lion with multicolor spots with fire issuant from its ears, nose and mouth, and is also called an English panther (left). Another sort of heraldic panther is the Continental panther(right) which has a more bovine (or sometimes avian) head and the forelegs of an eagle with claws on the hind feet as well, and a wolflike body (it is difficult to describe, and the PicDic describes one thing and pictures another). The English panter is pictured on the left, the Continental panther is on the right.
   Proper specifically refers to coloration. Wood proper is brown, a rose proper is red with green barbs and yellow seeds, etc. Table 3 of the Glossary of Terms defines many heraldic proper colorations.

Serena Fabrizio Name and Device, New
Sable, three doves volant contourny argent.
   The device will require a visual check against Melesent de Huguenin - February 1999: Sable, three owls rising sinister wing elevated argent each maintaining a willow slip vert. There is definitely one CD for posture, is there a type difference between these doves and the rising owls? Lions Blood would point out that Serena's doves are drawn with the identifying features of true heraldic doves, namely the head crest.

Titus Valerius Romanus Device, Resubmission to Kingdom
Gules, in pale a vol and a vol inverted between in fess two billets fesswise Or.
   His name was registered in August 2001.

Vinjar, Canton of Branch Name and Device, Resubmission to Kingdom
Quarterly sable and gules, a goblet argent within a laurel wreath Or.


The following have been returned for further work-

Aerik the Penault of Cumberland Name and Device, New
Gyronny sable and argent, a die pierced by a sword inverted gules.
   The submitter only allowed minor changes to the name. Although we could find documentation for the various elements, we could not justify the whole without making more than minor changes, therefore we must return it and suggest the submitter contact Æstel Herald for further assistance. Without a name to submit, we must also return the device. Dice are one of the rare charges in heraldry that are depicted in trian aspect normally, in order to show their cube shape. Dice spots need not specifically be blazoned, nor do the spots need to follow the Rule of Tincture so long as they are visible. Swords default to point up, therefore the blazon needed correction to reflect the true orientation of the sword. The submitter used colored pencil or crayon to color the emblazon, resulting in a particularly pink gules. Crayola markers, or a brand of similar quality, is best for producing true heraldic colors that do not fade or flake over time.

Juliana van Aardenburg Device, New
Vert, a castle and a chief Or.
   Conflict with Brigitte von Eisenburg - January of 1985 (via the East): Vert, a castle triple-towered within an orle flory counter-flory Or. There is only one CD for type change of secondary. As an orle occupies space all the way around a primary charge, you cannot get a placement CD between it and another secondary charge.

Lovell of Schadwode Device, New
Or, a winged wolf salient sable within a bordure embattled vert.
   Most of the commenters felt that the bordure had too many embattlements. The Rule invoked here is RfS VIII.3. Armorial Identifiability. - Elements must be used in a design so as to preserve their individual identifiability. With ten embattlements across the top the embattlements on the bordure were too many and too small. Five embattlements (square teeth pointing down) are optimal across the top of an embattled bordure, with the rest of the embattlements drawn in proportion. From any distance the embattlements on the device were difficult to discern as discrete sections. This was returned for a redraw, and no other problems were found.

Yolanda de Guelph Device, (Resubmission to Kingdom)
Azure, on a heart argent a rose gules leaved vert.
   Conflict with Anna Gertrude Leonhardt - Dec 1971: Azure, on a heart argent a lion rampant azure. The applicable rule is RfS X4.j. "Changes to Charges on Charges - Changes to a group of charges placed entirely on other charges may create one clear difference. No more than one clear difference can be obtained from changes to the same group of charges on other charges." The changes to the tertiary charge, the rose versus the lion, equal one CD.
   The original blazon, Azure, a heart argent overall a rose proper and leaved, had some problems. First, it omitted the tincture of the leaves. Blazons always end in a tincture or in a word which implies tincture, such as "proper", "counterchanged" or one of the special terms for gouttes or roundels. Second, overall is defined as "A term applied to charges that cross over both edges of another charge to lie on the field on either side. For instance, Or, a lion rampant purpure and overall a fess sable has the fess starting on the field on one side, crossing over the center of the lion, and lying on the field on the other side." As it lay entirely upon the heart, the rose was not overall. Had it been overall, it would have been a violation of the Rule of Tincture, as overall charges lie on and must have good contrast with the field.
   In SCA heraldry a rose is a rose is a rose. Garden roses are blazoned simply as roses and no difference exists between any sort of rose. Garden roses, therefore are legal; garden rosebuds are not, being non-period charges.


NEW SUBMISSIONS:

1. Ærne Clover (Aquaterra) Device, Resubmission to Kingdom
Or, a four-leaved shamrock saltirewise vert.
   The submitter's name was registered September 2001. This device was returned from kingdom in December 2000 because previously submitted name, "Ærne of the Clover" was unregisterable. Device was overlooked in name resubmission. No issues were discovered with the device at the time of the original submission. Submitter wishes canting arms, but believes a clover would not have the notched leaves she prefers. Evidence supporting this charge blazoned as clover would be appreciated.

2. An Tir, Kingdom of, Calendar Deputy (An Tir) Badge, New
Gules, a dolman argent.
   Badge is for the Kingdom Calendar Deputy. The submission form is signed by Groa, Queen An Tir.

3. Desiree of Colecestra (Cold Keep) Name, New
   The submitter will accept any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the submitter cares most about the sound of the name. The submitter desires a female name authentic for 12th Century England in the region of Essex. The submitter will allow the creation of a holding name.
   Desiree is documented using "A Statistical Survey of Given Names in Essex Co., England 1182-1272" by Susan Carroll-Clark (Nicolaa de Braxton) found online at http://www.s-gabriel.org/docs/#england which links to a second site http://members.tripod.com/nicolaa5/articles/names.html . A printed copy of the website is included with the name submission form.
   Colecestra is cited from Ekwall's The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place Names p. 116 under the subheading "Colchester." A notation on the form indicates that this is the Domesday Book spelling, but no specific date is given for the name.

4. Emma Randall (Blatha An Oir) Name, Change
   The submitter's original name, Emma in draumspaka, was registered in April 2000, and she wishes to release her previous name. The submitter will not accept any changes to the name. The submitter desires a female name authentic for 15-16th Century England.
   Emma is cited from Withycombeís The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd Ed., p. 103, sub Emma. Emma is cited as a female name from "Old German Emma or Imma, hypocoristic forms of the names compounded with ermin, irmin 'whole', 'universal'. The name was introduced into England by Emma, daughter of Richard I, Duke of Normandy." The name is dated 1186-1219, 1316, 1401, and 1440.
   Randall is cited from Reaney and Wilsonís A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition, p. 371, sub Randall, Randell, etc. The following spellings and dates are cited: Randal 1204; Randle de Stok 1260; Thomas Randel 1250; Richard Randall 1547. The name is also cited from Withycombeís The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd Ed., p. 249, sub Randal (m) which indicates "The surnames Randal(l), Randell . . . are derived from this [this name]." No date is given for this particular spelling in this reference, but various other spellings are dated from 1086-1565.

5. Gwenlian Catharne (Glymm Mere) Name and Device, New
Azure, a pale argent fretty azure between six dogwood blossoms argent seeded Or.
   The submitter will accept any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the submitter cares most about the language/culture of the name. The submitter desires an authentic feminine Welsh name, and she will allow the creation of a holding name.
   Gwenlian is cited from Morgan and Morganís Welsh Surnames p. 111, sub. GwenlliŠn, with the name Gwenlian Flouen dated to 1098.
   Catharne is also cited from Morgan and Morganís Welsh Surnames p. 61, sub. Cadarn, with the name Thomas Catharne dated to 1511.

6. Laurin of Rosewood (Stromgard) Device, Resubmission to Kingdom
Sable, on a rose argent barbed vert a cat sejant affronty sable a bordure argent.
   The submitter's name was registered May 2001. The submitter's original device, Per chevron vert and argent, in chief a rose between two trees argent and in base a domestic cat sejant affronty sable, was returned from kingdom in December 2000 for slot machine with three types of charge in the primary charge group. A second submission with the same blazon as this submission was returned from Kingdom in October 2001 because "commenters were unanimous in finding the combination of a cat with nearly no internal detailing placed in such a manner on the rose to render the entire set of charges in the middle of the field unidentifiable, even in color. Therefore, we are returning this for a redraw with the suggestion the cat be slightly smaller and have more internal detailing." This resubmission follows all suggestions made in the return.

7. Randal the Redowtable (Three Mountains) Badge, New
(Fieldless) checky argent and gules a cross formy.
   The submitter's name was registered November 1992. This is a fieldless badge, the cross itself is checky.

8. Rhonwen of Rhyl (Krakafjord) Name and Device, New
Sable, on a chief argent a swan rising wings elevated and addorsed gules.
   The submitter will accept any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the submitter cares most about the language/culture of the name. The submitter desires a feminine name authentic for 12th Century Wales, and she will allow the creation of a holding name.
   Documentation for the name is somewhat non-standard. The submitter makes the following observations:
   "Name searches from the internet dated June 1, 2001, indicate 'Rhonwen' is registerable." As documentation the submitter has included a hard copy of a name form search from the online armorial (newmarch.org mirror) that shows 37 previously registered matches to the "narrow case-insensitive name pattern='Rhonwen'."
   "Article entitled 'Welsh Names and Surnames' by J. B. Davies, specifically pg. 2, indicates place names were used for surnames in Northern Wales." The article is found online at http://www.korrnet.org/welsh/files/jbdavies.html and a hard copy is included with the name submission form.
   "Article entitled 'A Brief Introduction to Medieval Bynames' by Brian Scott and Joshua Mittleman (page 2) suggests geographical names were attributed to people who no longer resided in that place and who were, in fact, far from such place. There is some considerable distance between Krakafjord and Rhyl." The article is found online at http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/bynames and a hard copy is included with the name submission form.
   Rhonwen is cited from Withycombe's Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd Ed., p. 253, under the name 'Rhona.' The reference indicates that 'Rhonwen' is the Welsh version of Saxon 'Rowena.' No date is given. Note: current precedent indicates "previous registration is never evidence of current registerability. Too many factors are involved." The O&A cannot be used to document personal names.
   No documentation is provided for Rhyl.

9. Roland le Brun (Terra Pomaria) Name and Device, New
Per pale Or and gules, a griffin sergeant contourny argent maintaining an acorn proper and a sword argent on a chief sable two crescents argent.
   The submitter will accept any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the submitter cares more about the meaning of the name and he believes "the surname 'le Brun' [means] 'the brown.'" The submitter desires an authentic 12th to 14th Century Anglo-Norman masculine name, and he will allow the creation of a holding name. Use of the word "sergeant" in the blazon is not a typo. It should be noted that the name submission form was altered and the action boxes were removed - please check forms when you print them so this does not happen to you.
   Roland is documented using Robert Bartlett's England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075-1225, Clarenden Press (Oxford 2000), p. 169. This reference indicates an individual by the name of Roland of Galloway was "a baron that paid a sum of 500 marks to King John Lackland for an inquest into his wife's right to lands in the earldom of Huntingdon." No specific date is given for this event, but the previous paragraph details events in the mid-1100s. A photocopy of the reference is included with the name submission form.
   le Brun is documented using W. L. Warren's King John, University of California Press, p. 69 (no copyright date given). The submitter indicates "the name is found under Hugh X Count de La March le Brun Lord Lusignan (1183-1246). He was the second husband of Isabella Taillefer of Angouleme, who was the second wife of King John Lackland Plantagenet, the King of England. The name le Brun although the name of a historical noble, is not one that necessarily connotes some particular status or connection to any royal line." A photocopy of the reference is included with the name submission form.

10. Sweet Tamlin (Glymm Mere) Name, New
   The submitter will accept any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the submitter cares more about the meaning of the name (but does not indicate what he believes the name means). The submitter desires a masculine name. David of Moffat is listed as the consulting herald.
   Sweet is cited from Reaney and Wilson's A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition, p. 436 (sub "Sweet") with the name Swet Carbonel dated to 1292. The name is also found in Bardsley's Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames p. 731 (sub "Sweet") with the name Swet' le Bone dated to 1273.
   Tamlin is cited from Reaney and Wilson's A Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd edition, p. 439 (sub "Tamlin") with the name Peter Tamelyn dated to 1327. The "surname is derived as a 'double diminutive of Tam (Tom).'"

11. the North, Crown Principality of (Kitimat B.C.) Branch Name and Device, New
Azure, on a saltire between four mullets of eight points argent a laurel wreath azure.
   The branch will accept any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the branch cares more about the sound of the name. The branch does not specify any time period or culture for which they wish the name to be authentic. The branch name submission forms are signed by Aveloc the Young who was King of An Tir at the time of submission.
   The submission form states, "We could find no evidence of 'North' being used as a stand-alone name of places in period, but would like to note that 'The Kingdom of the East' and 'The Kingdom of the West' follow the same pattern." The branch does, however, indicate "We will allow any changes necessary for registration."
   Also included with the forms is a letter from the Seneschal of the Crown Principality of the North (Ljotr Einarsson) that states:
   "Let it be known that I, Ljotr Einarsson, AA, MI, JL, being the Seneschal of the Crown Principality of the North, have reviewed that material known as the Name and Device Poll, produced by the Herald of the Crown Principality of the North. Upon the conclusion of my review, I have found that the Populace of the North wish the name of the Crown Principality to be 'The North' and the arms to be 'Azure, on a saltire between four mullets of eight points argent, a laurel wreath azure' and that this information be submitted to the College of Arms.
   "Also, in the event the above is NOT acceptable to the College of Arms, the secondary choice is Tir Rioga for the name of the Crown Principality and the arms to be 'Per pale Or and sable, in pale a laurel wreath and a sealion counterchanged maintaining in dexter paw a vallary crown gules.'"
   "Signed in Vernon, B.C. this 18th day of October, AS XXXVI."
   The letter is signed in what appears to be Norse runes by the aforementioned Ljotr Einarsson. This meets the criteria outlined in Administrative Handbook section IV.c.5. under "Evidence of Support" for this sort of action: If a submission would result in the registration or modification of the Branch Name or Branch Arms of a kingdom, principality or equivalent branch, support must be demonstrated by the results of a poll conducted in the relevant official newsletter and certified by the seneschal of the appropriate branch. The principality seneschal's certification takes the place of a petition.
   Finally, copies of all of the relevant documents to the polls carried out by the Principality, as well as the "Name and Device Sub-Committee" are included with the submission forms in full.
   Lions Blood would like to point out that the laurel wreath is just about perfect.

12. Wolfryð of Leeds (Cái Mór) Name and Device, Resubmission to Kingdom
Per pale argent and gules, a wolf rampant counterchanged.
   The submitter will allow any changes to the name. If the name must be changed, the submitter cares more about the sound of the name. He wants a masculine name authentic for 12th Century (1350's) England, and he will allow the creation of a holding name. The submitter's previous name, Wulffryð of York, was returned from kingdom in July 2001 for "conflict with an important historical personage, St. Wilfrith of York, who was one of the foremost men of his day and brought the Rule of St. Benedict to England. Not only is there an auditory conflict (the names sound almost identical) but St. Wilfrith has substantive listings after his name in both Butler's Lives of the Saints and the Dictionary of Saints by Delaney, making him important enough for the College of Heralds to protect his name."
   The submitter's previous device, Azure, a cross argent overall a wolf gules, was returned on the same letter for numerous issues. First, overall charges must be truly overall, and this one is just barely over the edge of the cross. Secondly, an overall charge must have good contrast with the field. In this case, azure and gules do not have good contrast. Finally, the device as it stands conflicts with Azure, a cross argent (the national arms/flag of Greece), as well as Iceland, Azure a cross gules fimbriated argent. There is one CD for the change of type only to the tertiary charge group." The newly submitted device removes both the conflict and the style problems.
   Wolfryð is documented using the Academy of St. Gabriel report for Client 1629 found online at: http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfind.cgi?1629. The report states, "<Woulfrith> is a Middle English form of the Old English given (first) name <Wulffri{dh}>. [1] The specific form <Woulfrith> appears to be characteristic of the later 13th Century." A printed copy of the report is included with the name submission form. Note [1] explains that {dh} is an ascii representation of the letter ð. The Academy of Saint Gabriel uses ascii for its letters.
   of Leeds is documented using two sources. The first source is the Academy of St. Gabriel report for Client 1994 found online at: http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfind.cgi?1994. The report states, "Locative surnames, which identify where someone is from, are a common kind of surname for the period after the Norman Conquest." A printed copy of the report is included with the name submission form. The city itself is documented using Encyclopedia Britannica, Micropedia, Vol VI, 1984, p. 119. This reference states "Lees (is) a city lying in the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England, 25mi (40km) southwest of York." It also states "Leeds early became a local market center but retained its rural character throughout the Middle Ages. In 1207 the local lord of the manor granted a limited charter to the inhabitants." A photocopy of the reference is provided.


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